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REFERENCE 
COLLECTION 

CLEVELAND 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 




mu AMHimmi 




VISUALIZING DEFENSE PRODUCTION 

^ ISSUE 1 ' VOL 12 ' FEBRUARY' 1951 / 




"^ 




4. 



X 




THIS 
IS 



MR. TUX 



COMPLETE PROGRAMI 



and in "Tips About Tux" he shows 
salesmen of Marathon products how 
to open new accounts for Tux nap- 
kin service and KEEP them open 
with repeat business that will mean 
more money in their pockets 
through better selling. 



This black and white sound slidefilm is just one of the implementation tools Atlas 
created for Marathon's new sales training program. 

Whether your problem be selling, training, demonstrating or service. Atlas' ex- 
perienced creative and producing staff can help you in planning a complete pro- 
gram that will do your job effectively and economically. 






/4^^^^ ^cfe ^jcnfic%^ti(M' 



ESTABLISHED 1913 



1 1 1 i Soi th Boulevard 



Oak Park, Illinois 




Motion Pictures 
Sound Slidefilms 
Minute Movies 
Group Leader Manuals 
Hand-Out Literature 
Easel Presentations 
Review Materials 
Individually Designed Cases 



Chicago Telephone: AUstin 7-8620 




53- 18317 




IS hIMOWIM 
BY THE COIVIP/\NY HE hEEPS 

We could fill many paces with commendatory letters from Caravel clients. The 
following excerpts, from just a few of these letters, tell their own story . . . 



AMERICAN CAN COMPANY: "VITAMIN 
RIVERS in color, ihc 16mm show vou made 
for us last vcar. bids fair to set an all-time 
high in school demand." 

ASSOCIATED MERCHANDISING CORPORA- 
TION: "We found the people at Caravel to 
be extremelv cooperative at all times, gentle- 
men of their vsord. and sticklers for detail. 
Of equal importance, thev never lost interest 
in our complicated problems and put consider- 
ably more time and effort in our production 
than their contract called for." 

AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COM- 
PANY, LONG LINES DEPARTMENT: "I Ct me 
express to \oii personaliv the apprcciatii>n of 
us all for the craftsmanship, patience and un- 
derstanding uhich \ou have displayed ever 
since that first distant meeting." 

GODFREY L. CABOT, INC.: "I am really very 
happv about our two new films. A STl'DY 
IN Bl ..AC K and CIOOD COMPANY, which 
Caravel produced for us. The superior qual- 
ity which Nour competent staff built into 
these two productions is in a great way re- 
sponsible for their success as sales and public 
relallons activities." 

FULLER BRUSH COMPANY: "I can't think of 
an\lhini; whith uould express more salis- 
faclum than the fact that we have just con- 
tracted with \ou to do a second picture." 

CLINTON FOODS, INC. (AGENCY- MAXON, 
INC.): ll h.is been the general consl■n^us of 
opinion that this industrial motion picture, 
CiROW^TH INDUSTRY, is one of the finest 
its viewers have ever seen ... I w.int to ex- 
tend ms thanks to you for a very superior job 
of cooperation -by a group of people who 



have demonstrated that they know the busi- 
ness of making color motion pictures from 
A to Z." 

CLUETT, PEABODY A CO., INC.: "We are 

mighliK pleased to have been honored with 
first prize for the best 16mm motion picture. 
ENTERPRISE, which your organization 
helped us produce . . . Congratulations to 
Caravel!" 

THE GENERAL FIREPROOFING CO.: "You will 

undoubtedly be glad to know that our latest 
film ... is being excellently received in the 
field. During the first sixty days we are able 
to trace a large number of direct orders to 
the film " 

NATIONAL LUTHERAN COUNCIL: 'We have 
been pleased with C ar.ivel ^-llm^ for the 
understan'iing manner in which they have 
assisted and cooperated with us in the prep- 
aration of the script, the filming of the stories 
and diKumentarics and the final production. 
We have been aided in these film productions 
by the stintulus of Nour artistic imagination 
and your sensitivity to the particular religious 
needs of our appeal. We have been completely 
s;itisfied with your cooperation in these films 
and unhesitatingly recommend your work for 
consideration of other religious groups." 

NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANY: "The two 

films ha\e been shi>wn to many thousands of 
our people, and their reactions seem to con- 
firm our high hopes Ihey have been favor- 
ably received and very favorably commented 
upon." 

THE PURE OIL COMPANY: "Today we showed 

our new coKu s.'und miMiiin picture. fO- 
MORROW HIC.INS 1()D\Y. to the (hair- 



man of our Executive Committee. C hairman 
of the Board. President of the Company, 
three vice presidents and a half dozen more 
assistant vice presidents. Without exception 
they are extremely enthusiastic about the film, 
and feel it is the best thing the company has 
ever had along this line." 

RAYBESTOS-MANHATTAN, INC.: "ll is a rare 

thing these d.ivs to have \our business ap- 
preciated; and to gel such willingness and co- 
operation in exchange is indeed a great satis- 
faction and pleasure. We do want to thank 
you all for the fine Caravel service." 

ROYAL TYPEWRITER COMPANY. INC.: "We 
want to express iiur appreci.ition t*) each staff 
member of Caravel Films who assisted in the 
development of our movie RIGHT -AT THE 
ST.-\RT for their excellent cooperation and 
personal interest displayed during and since 
production. Reports from various parts of 
the country indicate that the film is being well 
received by typing educators." 

SOCONY-VACUUM OIL COMPANY, INC.t 

\I.iru verb.ii coninientv from directors, man- 
agers, salesmen, dealers, and consumers as- 
sure us of another hit. Once again Caravel 
came through. Of course, after eighteen years 
and about fifty pictures, wc should be accus- 
tomed to this vort of thing." 

TOWIE MANUFACTURING COMPANY: "The 

sound slidcfilm which you have just com- 
pleted for us. ONE FOR THE B(K)K. has 
been very well received by our management 
and sales organization. The entire prvKluc- 
tion is a top-quality job and wc ate proud to 
show it to our dealers as a fowle and Cara- 
yel PriHluclion." 



The people responsible for the foregoing statements (names on request) speak 
from personal experience. We are immensely grateful for their confidence — 
and for their generous appreciation of Caravel service and Caravel teamwork. 



CARAVEL FILMS 



730 FIFTH AVENUE 



INCORPORATED 
NEW YORK 



TEL 



CIRCLE 



6 110 



The great films of 
Today are shot with 

a MYe4e//\* 



C 



The MITCHELL STUDIO MODEL'BNCis 

a truly silent camera for sound photography. 
No blimp is required. Its smooth, positive 
operation saves many costly hours of pro- 
duction time. Since the introduction of the 
"BNC," more and more major studios have 
made it standard equipment. 



i 



The MITCHELL "16" is enthusiastically 
acclaimed by leading commercial pro- 
ducers as the first professional camera to 
bring theatre -like quality to the 16 mm 
screen. Typically MITCHELL in design 
and workmanship, it contains the same 
proven features that made MITCHELL 
cameras famous throughout the world. 



/ff/YcAe// Carmera 



CORPORATION 



666 WIST HARVARD STRIET . 6LENDALE 4, CALIFORNIA • CABLE ADDRESS: "MITCAMCO" 

lASTIIN lirilSlNTATIVI. THIOOOBI AITMAN* 931 flMH AVINUl • NIW TOtK CITT 17 . MURIAT Hill 2. 7031 

^^ 15% of the MotUn pUl«r«f fhewii ia Ihtalrts ikrevghewl lb* world art filmed with • Mitchell 




!§oiiietliiies even 
llie!!$e woirt iki • • • 

Many machine operations in a modern industrial plant are so 
rapid even the eye can't follow. Time and motion studies by usual 
methods often fall short of the needed exactness. 

Because accurate analyses can mean the difference between 
profit and loss, many plant engineers now depend on movies taken 
with Bell & Howell precision equipment. 

The experience of the Ramsey Corporation is only one of 
many. The extraordinary' precision with which Bell & Howell 
cameras, projectors and accessories are built make them ideal for 
all industrial needs. 



Basic for industrial use... 

The 16nini 7tl-TM. .simwii ht-ie, is built both 
for heavy^iuty and precision work. 7 accu- 
I .-itu film speeds especially for time study 
500. 750. 1000. 1500. 2000. 3000 and 4000 
frames per minute. Accurate spring drive. 
Adapted to take electric motor. The wide 
variety of accessories for this camera make 
it ideal for any industrial purpose. Special 
projectors for time study use also available. 

You buy for life when you buy 




Bell a Howell 



How Ramsey Corporation solved 
vexing time study problem . . . 




Ramsey Corporation of St. Louis, makers of auto- 
motive piston rings and expanders, needed depend- 
able analyses of certain machine operations as a 
basis for piece rates. Usual obsei-vational methods 
produced unsatisfactory results. 







With the cooperation of Bell & Howell enKineers. 
time studies were then made on film using Bell & 
Howell equipment. The result was the establishment 
of piece rates satisfactoi-y to all concerned. The 
visual analyses also led to a number of improve- 
ments in operational methods. Shown is William A. 
Vogler of Ramsey Corporation exhibiting time study 
film to group of employees. 



BOOKLET SHOWS HOW MOVIES A 
IN TIME-MOTION STUDIES 

T.or out and ..nd toili 

B«ll t Howvll Company 

710t McCormick Rood. Chicogo 45, III 

Gentlemen: 

Please send me your free booklet 

"Measure Time Accur»tely." 



CtY 




NUMBER 1 



VOLl MK 12 • 193 1 



A Mail) ini|>or(aiit iidilitioiis havi- 
been made lo tin- total »>f tilms for 
industrial training siiiic publica- 
tion of tlic S«'<ond Kditioii of TuE 
Indkx ok Thaimm. Kii.ms. tin- giiido 
to motion [lirturfs and slide films 
a\ailabli- for tin- |iur|>osc. 'I'lu- Tliird 
Kdition. |irf(>urfd b> tlif editors of 
Itt siNESs Si:rkkn Magazine, is now 
on the |>ress. with more than 2.')(K1 
tilms listeil, besides pertiiu-nt data 
and descriptions. 

Sipniticant is the entry of a num- 
ber of new sponsors, following the 
trend of realization by industry at 
large that the screen provides a 
prai'ticallv limitless potential for in- 
ireasing and impro\inf: production. 
With the clouds of general war 
hanging heavily over a jittery civil- 
ization, production rapidly is be- 
coming the focus of industrial 
thought, and audio-visual aids can 
take a major post in that front line 
of national defense. 

Following is a brief resume of 
highlights of rt'sponses from com- 
panies in the comprehensive survey, 
noting important additions of titles 
as well as withdrawals of prints. 

• • • 

♦ The Aluminum Company of 
.\nierica has made a number of im- 
portant changes in its lineup of in- 
dustrial training films. Titles are 
in finished Rainhoiis. Curiosity 
Shop and The Davenport Story. Re- 
moved from circulation are Alum- 
inum Fahrication Processes and 
How lo Weld Aluminum. .Alumi- 
num: Mine to Metal has been suc- 
ceeded bv This Is .Aluminum. The 
companv has 1.3 other .sound mo- 
tion pictures available. 

• • • 

♦ The American Brass Company at 
present has no training films for 
distribution. S. B. Rudder, of the 
sales promotion department, notes 
that both Frimi Mine to Consumer 
and Manujacture oj .-inaionda .Sheet 
Copf/er have been withdrawn. 

♦ Three motion pictures added by 
the American Institute of Steel Con- 
struction, Inc.. since publication of 
the SrTond Kdition i>f TllE INDEX, 
are liiiitd ii ilh Steel. Span Supreme 
and liritliiinp a (Century. The five 
subjects previously listed continue 
to he available for your free loan. 

• • • 

♦ Application of the Iron-Carbon 
Kquilibrium Diagram is illustrated 
in Iron-Carbon .-ilUns, Uimm sound, 
color film relea.sed by the American 
Society for .Metals, ['rinls of Metal 
Crystals are still available. 

♦ Disrontiniiing the two films Ray- 
on and Rayon, .4 Aeif Frontier oj 
Progress, the American V is<o»e Cor- 
poration has two lo succeed them: 



Visiializinjl Defense Prodiiclion 

NEW THIRD EDITION OF INDEX OF TRAINING FILMS 
LISTS 2,900 AVAILABLE SUBJECTS FOR INDUSTRY 



Science Spins a Yarn, .sound-color 
storv of .sot) vears of effort to create 
and perfect rayon, and How Rayon 
Is Made, sound-black-and-white, 
showing key steps in making both 
viscose and acetate rayon. There is 
a (iT-frame silent filmslrip of the 
last-named, which is a revision of 
Ravon-A New Frontier of Progress. 

♦ Forty Fathom Fish has been with- 
drawn by General Foods Corpora- 
lion's Seafood Divisions. 

• « • 

♦ General Motors Corporation no 
longer has available these films: 
ff ings for Defense, Modes and Mo- 
tors, Made to Take It, Frontiers of 
the Future, Remote Control. Science 
in Business. Diesels Working on the 
Railroads. The widely known The 
Open Door continues in circulation. 

• • * 

♦ The picture Airplane .Streamlined 
Tires has been removed by the Gen- 
eral Tire & Rubber Company. 

• * « 

♦ Modern Coal Mining and Syn- 



ihi-lir Ruhher i-ontinue available 
from llie (Joodvear Tire and Rub- 
ber Company, but the following 
have become obsolete: Cushioned 
Landings, Greatest .Airship Dock, 
Inner Tube, and Stor\' of the Tire. 

• « • 

♦ The (Irecn Giant Company I for- 
merly Minnesota Valley Canning) 
has in extensive circulation among 
organizations and s<hools its From 
Goml Earth lo Good Tables, sound- 
color film on i)ea canning, after re- 
moving its predecessor. Green 
Giant. Modern Talking Picture 
Service, Inc., is the distributor. 

♦ Gregg Publishing Company's The 
Champions Write is now available 
through Business Education Films. 

♦ Withdrawn is the film Manufac- 
ture of Refractories of the Harbi- 
son-Walker Refractories Company. 

* • • 

♦ Yellow Magic, dealing with the 
mining of sulphur, is being revised 
by the Freeport Sulphur Company. 

* » * 

♦ On free loan from Hercules Pow- 



Business Screen Magazine 

"The I\alional Business Journal of Audio-t isual Communications" 

Preview of Contents 

Trends in Industrial Film Production 21 

The Cities Service Photo Library 24 

Films lo Improve Dealer Relations 26' 

Merchandising and the Visual Medium 28 

Sports Parade: The Latest in Sponsored Films 28 

New Pictures With a Mission 30 

In tin- Picture Parade 34 

Television in the News 38 

Business Screen Executive 40 

The New Audio-Visual Equipment ...42 

Films Promote Better Living: Reviews 44 



Number 1 



Volume 1 2 



1951 



K-iiF (Jnr. \()lmiit Iwi'lvt oi Business Screen .M.-iRiizinc inihlislii'd 
FeUruary 15, IV51. Issued 8 times annually at six-week intervals at 
150 ICast .Superior .Street. CliicaKo 11, Illinois liv Mii-iness Screen 
M.iK.i/iiies, Inc. I'lione WHitcliall 4-6807. O. H. Coelln. Jr., Editor 
and Publisher. In New York City: Robert Seymour. Jr., AH') Fifth 
.•\v.nne. Telei.lione Klversicic 9-0215 or illrray Hill 2-2A'ii. In Los 
Angelei: Edmund Kerr, 'i<)OS Hollywood Hlvd. Telephone IlKmp- 
sleail .1171. Snhscription $3.00 a year; $5.00 two years (domestic I ; 
$4.00 and $7.00 foreign. Kntcrcd as second class matter May 2, l'>4<), 
at the post oflicc at Chicago, Illinois, under Act of March 3, 1879. 
Kntirc contents Copyright 1951 by Business Screen Magazines, Inc. 
Trademark registered U. S. Patent Office. Address adverti^^ing and 
-iiliscription inquiries to the Chicago office of publication 



(icr Company are these new sound- 
color motion pictures: Problem-So 
lution-Resull, on products of chemi- 
cal plants; Better Roads Ahead, 
vinsol resin in concrete, and Re- 
claiming ImiuI with Dynamite. 

♦ From the International .Nickel 
Companv. Inr-., come these addi- 
tional lilms. distributed by Ideal 
Pictures Corporation: Sickel Tales, 
narrated by Norman Brokenshire; 
Story of Nickel, mining, milling 
and refining; Building a Character 
Metal, from raw material to shot, 
and Sickel Winning, on mining. 

♦ The International Acetylene As- 
sociation, which has removed Prof- 
its of Progress and Prosperity Prog- 
ress from circulation, has a new 
subject, The Oxy-Acet\lene Flame — 
Master of .Metals, which is available 
for free loan through the Bureau of 
Mines. Graphic Services Station, 
4800 Forbes Street, PitUburgh 12. 

Pa. 

« • • 

♦ Jones & I^amson Machine Co. has 
withdrawn the slidefilm Thread 
Grinding with Jones & Lamson 
Equipment. Motion pictures with 
sound available from the company 
are J&L Universal Ram Type Tur- 
ret Lathe I Introductory), Bar Work 
on a J&L Universal Turret Lathe 
( USOE-.Advanced), and Thread 
Grinding — Fully Automatic. 

♦ The Kerr Glass Manufacturing 
Corp. writes that it has withdrawn 
From Desert Sands to Sparkling 
Glass Creations. 

* * • 

♦ Two motion pictures withdrawn 
by The Caterpillar Tractor Com- 
pany are It's Up to You and Diesel 
Simpliciiy. 

♦ The four slidefilms under the 
heading Steel are no longer avail- 
able from The Cleveland B. Chase 
Co., Inc., producers and distributors 
of the Vocafilm programs of super- 
visory training and customer rela- 
tions. 

♦ Films impinging on industrial 
operations but of general interest, 
released by the Dodge Division of 
the Chrysler Corporation since the 
.Second Edition include: Our Amer- 
ica, comparing .American produc- 
tion past and present: Rubber River. 
(Antral .American hunt for new 
sources; Strategic Materials, indus- 
trial pioneering: and \orthward to 
\ome, gold mining. 

♦ Physics of Metal Cutting is out 
of |)rint. writes C!harles M. Rccscy. 
advertising manager of The Cin- 
cinnati Milling Machine Co. The 
Cleveland Pneumatic Tool Company 
has withdrawn Keep 'Em Landing. 
and Coke Oven .Ammonia Research 
Bureau has dropped Plant Food 
Irom Coal. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Better be ignorant of a matter than half know it. 

— PUBLILIUS SYRUS (CIRCA B. C 42). 



A little learning is a dangerous thing. 



—ALEXANDER POPE (1688-1744). 



1 >l OT THE LEAST of many advantages in training by a 
program of audio-xisual media is the ease with w hich an intri- 
cate exposition is clarified so the audience receises the nhoh' 
story. The presentation can be dramatic and unforgettable, and 
it can be compressed into a crisp narrati\e that teaches w ith 
speed and complete con\ iction. 

Personnel w ill learn your methods and accept your ideas more 
readily, retaining more of the message if it is in a Wilding 
picture. 



PICTURE PRODUCTIONS. INC 



CHICAGO^ 

1345 Argylc Street 

NEW YORK 

385 Madison Ave. 



DETROIT* 

4925 Cadieux Rd. 



CLEVELAND 

310Swctland Bldg. 



HOLLYWOOt 

5981 Venice Blvd. 



ST. LOUIS 

4053 Lindcll Blvd. 



CINCINNATI 

Enquirer Bldg. 
*Studio Facilities 




^^ *-» ■ 



% X r^ -I- ¥-•¥ T^mfTfT r ^ XT »^ll Xlt 





COMBINATION SLIDE, SINGLE and DOUBLE FRAME STRIP FILM PROJECTOR 



If's so easy to use, too.' Designed for extreme simplicity of operation 
combined with maximum efficiency. Finger tip tilt control, instantaneous 
framing and clear, needle-sharp focusing all combine to moke Viewlex top 
choice for slide or filmstrip projection before sizeable audiences. The quiet 
and powerful, motor-fan model gives utmost protection and safeguards the 
life of valuable films and slides. 



y/iwit//. 




INC. . 35-01 QUEENS BOULEVARD • LONG ISLAND CITY 1, N. Y. | 



Bl.SINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



- 



We rest 01}^ C2se on QOk-WJ 



fe al-idipor+ant du^ h^ure of 



COLUMBIA 

SLIDE@DFILM 

TRANSCRIPTIONS 




COLUMBIA TRANSCRIPTIONS, A DIVISION OF COLUMBIA RECORDS, INC. 

New York: 799 Seventh Avenue, Circle 5-7300 r»*M^Toi»6<.-« •^••<» ■".«•'». o*«*^ 

Los Angeles: 8723 Alden Drive, BRodshow 2-5411 

Chicago; Wrigley Building, 410 Michigan Avenue, WHiteholl 6000 



or 



M M B t R 1 • \ O L I -M t I : • 1 ") 5 1 



fmiwM liosulis! 




For television films of theatrical 
(f H a li ty\ t ry the new " Cine- Vo ice " 
16mm Sound-On-Film Camera. Tested 
and nan- being used by leading studios 
and television stations for public 
relations, neicsreels and commercials. 



$695.00 tcith a .Wdny 
mi>nf\-luick fiuiirnntpp. 
) (»ii iniml Itr siitixju'il. 
ff rite today for free 
illiixtriitfil "C.inp- 1 nirr" 
folder dfsrrihiiiff this 
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IIHH\IIT-ltll'll. liKiiriiiiriiloil 

7:{S7 |{p\('rl\ IMvd.. Los Anifch's :{(i. (iilit. 

MANUFACTURERS OF SOUND-ON-FILM RECORDING EQUIPMENT SINCE 1931 



SIGHT & SOUND 



NPA Motion Picture Division 
Is Headed by Nathan Golden 

♦ Nmiian I). (Joi.DKN. niiu <liri'(- 
|i>r iif till' Moticiii I'ictiiri- - I'liolo- 
graphic Products Division of the 
National Production /Vuthority, 
is in charge of developing NPA pro- 
grams to develop photographic sup- 
plies for tlie accelerated aniiainenl 
program and essential industry. 

Golden, as Chief of the Motion 
Picture Division of the Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce of 
the Department of Commerce, was 
consullant in World War II to the 
War Produition Hoard and the Of- 
fice of the Coordinator for Inter- 
American Affairs. After the war he 
headed a mission to Germany to 
obtain the formulas of the Agfa 
Color System, for the Industrial In- 
telligence Branch Office of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff. 

The first Gold Medal Award of 
the Projection Advisory Council 
went to Golden for contributions in 
the field of motion picture projec- 
tion. He was consullant to the 
Golden Gate International Exposi- 
tion, and to the United States dele- 
gation to the third meeting of the 
contracting parties to the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and 
the Tariff Negotiations in France in 
1949. 

Final Call for National Safety 
Film Awards Is Now Announced 

♦ Four fields of safety films — oc- 
cupational, home, traffic and trans- 
portation, and general- are covered 
in ihe contest, and awards for the 
best motion |)ictures. theatrical 
(35 mm) and no n -theatrical 
(16mm I will be made in each cate- 
gory, as well as the best sound 
slidefilms (sound filmslrips). 

The National Conuuittee will pick 
as winners those pictures and films 
"which best serve to encourage ac- 
cident prevention." 

I Separate entry forms have been 
issued for moti<in picture and sound 
slidefilm. While the deadline for 
receipt of entries is February 19. 

! the film itself must be in the hands 
of the committee by February 26. 
Several of the films will be used 
in the screen session program at 
the (Greater New ^ ork Safety Con- 
xcntion and Kxposilion. after the 
judging is completed. All films 
will be returned in early April, 
Railway Fxjiress cidlecl. 

In ils l<-lter lo sponsors and pro- 
ducers the Commitlee re<|uesled in- 
formation of safel) films made by 
others. 

♦ Preliminaries to determination 



of the outstanding safety motion 
pictures and slidefilms produced or 
lelea.sed in 195(J have been com- 
pleted uilh the mailing of entry 
blanks. The annual contest, with 
no charge for entry or award, is 
conducted fjy the .National Com- 
mittee on Films for Safety. Entries 
must be received by February 19th. 
William Englander, Committee 
Secretary, may be addressed at 425 
No. Michigan Ave., Fifth Floor, 
Chicago 11. III. 

Standard Oil Arranges Clinic 
On Screen in Public Relations 

♦ \ training clinic in the use of 
films will bring together all adver- 
tising and public relations repre- 
sentatives of the Standard Oil 
Company I Indiana) at the Train- 
ing Center in Chicago February 16. 
with addresses and discussions on 
the subject of "Film Showings." 

O. H. Coelln, Jr., editor and pub- 
lisher of Business Screen Maga- 
zine, will address the gathering and 
present concrete suggestions for 
improved utilization of audio-visual 
means in public relations work and 
will answer (|uestions in a discus- 
sion period to follow. 

Three field representatives of the 
company will speak on these sub- 
jects: "Sources of Film Materials 
and How to Evaluate Objectives 
for Various Types of Meetings," 
■"How to Promote the Use of Films 
at Public and Employe Meetings," 
and "How to Handle the Mechanics 
t)f Providing Films and Equip- 
ment." 

0. H. Peterson will introduce the 
speakers and officiate as moderator. 

Wadsworth and 600 Mayors 
View "Pattern for Survival" 

♦ Jamks J. Wadswokth. national 
director of Civil Defense. 600 U. S. 
mayors, members of the American 
Municipal Association and other 
guests attended a screening of the 
atomic defense film Pattern for 
Survival in Washington last month. 

Screening of the film was in con- 
junction with the Association's an- 
nual convention. William L. Lau- 
rence, New York Times writer and 
atomic expert, and Pulitzer Prize 
winner, appears in the picture re- 
cently produced bv Cornell Films, 
New York. 

Commercial Film 
Writer 

Available soon. One of the best. 
Experience, clientele, qualifica- 
tions, and references, all top 
notch. Minimum $9,500. For 
complete information, write, 

BUSINESS SCREEN. Box 2A 

ISO E. Superior St., Chicago I t 






BUSINESS SCREEN MACAZINK 




Vanusti 

used the 
1 same 
\ brushes 





V 

Tan 



ICHELANGELO 



r 




. ^nusti and Michelangelo lived at the same time, 

painted the same subjects, used the same materials . . . 

yetVanusti has long been forgotten while the fame of 

Michelangelo is immortal. In commercial motion pictures, 

too, the touch of the master makes the big 

difference berv\een mediocrity and greatness . . . 

between just telling your story and delivering it 

with stirring impaa and real conviaion. 



PRODUCTION LINES 



A cmiiilf of M-ar> agn. 
w.' Iia.l a I'KdHI.KM . . . 

The Alhlrlir liiBlilulc. u nalionni, noii-prufil or- 
gani/alion for the ii(lv,tni'r*nirnt of «iiort.» iiiul rerrea- 
tioii, lull ilrt itif i) lo l.itiiitlt A liliii procrjiti lo Ifjfh 
ynun|CMrr< llir fuiiil.iiiit'Mt.il 'kill" of '•|iort>. (lol. 
Tlif*o(l4»rf- Italik. itrr^idrnl of llir liiHliliilr. llir4>up;h 
lonf r\|>rri<-iirr miiIi i-porlo lniiiiiii|C, fril lliut a NEU 
kinil of film uj- iimlril. 



Avuilatilr niolion piciurr!* Minirhow "niiss«>4l the boat." 
Thrir ronlrolird s|>rfj Irfl <iitnr of the audirnte far 
iM-hintl. in^ultrtj the innjtr aL>ility of othrr>. The movie 
lieiame the teailirr, without rrcard tor the -kill, fx- 
prrienre. and intelligence of the aiiiiience. 



Our PKOBI.EM. then, was lo teach move- 
iiifnl uitlumi n mmiiij: medium. 

• • • 

Our SfH.l I lO.N was to freeze movement 
and present it in still picture sequence — in 
sound slidchlms. 




1 lie trick i* in -trubo-copie lights, rapahle of an- 
alyzing movement, at a »peed of 1 10,0(10 of a !-erond 
. . . ihi* in COLOR, too! With this equipment, we 
catrh the rrurial po-ition- of a movement in a single 
pirture, lo be thrown on a gymna§ium >rreen for 
•tudy and imitation bv grade i>rhool and high srhool 
kid^. 

• • • 

Sime 40 subjerts are now in distribution, and we're 
currently workine on basketball techniques. Probably 
the Im--»i evidence of the success of the "strobe" technique 
for this tyiw of training is the fact that the schools are 
huyine prints. There i- n<» free distribution. 




I he techniques we're Using in the.e sports films 
have an application in many other kinds of training 
. . . wherever movement i< fundamental in training, 
and the normal -peed of the movement in too fa»t 
for Hudy and imitation like a ba>eball pitch or a 
machine operation ... a golf >wing or motion study 
of a manufacturing proce»», 

• • • 

Uc'd like to show vou whul »<• moan — 
how we might wjIv.- YOl H rHOHI.KMS 
with strohoM-opic slidetiims. 

• • • 

And how we're licking other PHOBI.EMS 
as they rome up, too. 



r-QO 



DALLAS JONES 



"^ PRODUCTIONS 
1725 North Wells Street 

Chicago M, Illinois 




srn E E IV 



CrCCe 



Despite Defen.se Upset.s, Bu.sincss Films 
Off to Good Year With Demand Strong 

if Clients, including the .Armed Forces, were 
keeping a good many business filiii producers 
busy as the first six weeks of '.SI slipped by. 
Notable progress was being made in new films 
of a public relations or institutional character 
with some major programs due to break next 
month ill national dislrilnilioti. 

New York Stock Exchange Budgets New Film 
■¥■ Production of a new motion picture, long un- 
der consideration (Business Scrkkn. May 19501 
bv the New York Stock Exchange, has just been 
aimouncetl. Part of a new SHOO.dOO public edu- 
cation program, the Exchange will also build 
a theatre and exhibition gallery in its building 
on Wall Street and cooperate with the Institute 
of Life Insurance in distributing information 
kits to the 16.500 member clubs of the General 
Federation of Women's Clubs. 

New Fords Shown First Via "Operation '51" 
"k About a montli before the new two-spinner 
I iirds hit the market, every Ford management 
and supervisory employee got a preview screen- 
ing of the entire new line of Fords, Mercurvs 
and Lincolns. 

A film. Operation '51 . produced by MPO Pro- 
ductions, demonstrated all the cars so that Ford 
supervisors and executives all over the country 
could see the features of the new models in 
advance, before shipment of the first cars off 
the line could begin. 

Campus Issues "Accent on Quality" Booklet 
"k Film sponsors will be interested in a clever 
new brochure "Accent on Quality" recently 
issued by Campus Film Productions. 161 Rem- 
sen Street. Brooklyn. Copies will l>e sent free 
on rc(|ucst. 

Norling Demonstrates 3-Dimension in N. Y. 
•k LoucKS & NoRLiNC Studios will present a 
program of the latest developments in three 
dimensional photographv at the March 30 meet- 
ing of the .Stereo .Societv of .America. 

.Action stereos taken at a millionth of a sec- 
ond and projected on an 1 1 x 14 foot screen 
will highlight the program. 

The Stereo Society meets at the Central High 
-School of Needle Trades, 225 West 21th Street. 
New York. 

Roush Opens Modern Studios at Mineola, L. I. 
kr The cameras rolled for the first time on Jan- 
uary 15 at Leslie Roush Productions' new 
studios in Mineola, Long Island, not far from 
New York. 

Shortage of good .sound stage facilities in 
New York and increased rei|uirements of the 
company led to construction of the new build- 
ing which was begun last October, 

Completely equipped with all camera, light- 
ing and sound equipment for black & white or 
color shooting, the new studios were built from 
the ground up to take advantage of all modern 
improvements in studio design. The souikI stage 
measures 45 by 65 feet and is 22 feet high, 
lurlher expansion is possible if required. 




ON sta(;e at Lvslii' Roush' ni-tc Minfohi. /,. /. 
studios ahoti- arr 1 1 to r) youthful actor 
Jininty McC.orinick, Mr. Roush (o-nti'r). and 
11 illiam Harrijian. 1 I .S. Riihbrr film sii'Uf 
is being chcckrd. 



Naval Reserve Photo Officers' Weekly Drills 

"k E\er\ Wednesdav night some 26 New York 
film [)roducers. directors and photograjdiers 
meet at the olhces of \X illard Pictures or Film 
Graj)hics for a drill. No marching enthusiasts, 
the 26 are members of the Naval Reserve Volun- 
teer .Aviation Unit 3-11 (Photo), commanded 
by Capt. John M. Squiers. jr.. and the "drills" 
consist of lectures, showings and new films, 
demonstrations of new training film techniques 
and occasional field trips to the Navy's Special 
Devices Center at Sands Point. 

VAU 3-11 was organized last November by 
Lt. Gordon L. Hough, then temporary unit com- 
mander, for those officers and men in the photo- 
graphic professions who wanted to keep up their 
interest and association with the Navy, and to 
increase their proficiency in the skills which 
would be required of them in case of national 
emergency. 

In addition lo Capt. Squiers (of \^'illard Pic- 
tures) and Lt. Hough (lately of Film Counsel- 
ors), the unit is compt)sed of LCdr. Michael C. 
Adams (RKO Pathe). LCdr. Lee E. Blair 
I Film Graphics), Lt. ( jg) Fred D. Bryant, LCdr, 
William H. Buch (Apex Films). LCdr. Ri.hard 
\. (^hindblom (Sun Dial I'ilms). LCdr. Law- 
rejice Crolius. Lt. Maxwell M. Desser, LCdr. 
William Dunn. J. W. Evans. Lt. Robert T. 
Furman, LCdr. Erskine F. Gilbert (Willard Pic- 
tures), Lt. J. A. Julier I Paul Hance Prod.). 
LCdr. .Allan F. Kitchel i I iiiversal Newsreel). 
Lt. Osmond Molarskv. Lt. Neil O'Brien, Cdr. 
Stanton M. Osgood (NBC-TV), LCdr. H. Raw- 
lins, LCdr. Sherman E. Rogers, Lt. Bernard 
Rubin (Film Opti<als). LCdr. Robert Spafford 
iSkvline Prod.). LCdr. John A. Wells (Merck 

& Co.). Lt. West P. W Ibridge (RKO Pathe) 

and Capt. MC Tom Wright (BBDO). 

VAU 3-11 is one of several such groups in 
the Naval Reserve. The Chicago unit is coni- 
inand<-d b\ Lieut. Jerome C. Diebold (Wilding 
Pictures). In addition to the weekly drills, 
some of the members of the New York unit 
have gone on active duty for a two weeks photo- 
graphic course in Washingtcm. This course is 
open on a quota basis to all qualified jihoto- 
grapbli' olTicers in volunteer units. 

In addiliiMi to mainlaining their interest in 
the Navy and new developments in Naval Pho- 
tography, most of the members of V.AU 3-11 
have discovered that the weekly drills have been 
useful in their civilian occupations. 



Bl.siNKSS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




SPEECH CLASSES A Re»e'« 
Rtcorder helps improye dict.on 
ond voice of oil itodents Thow 
with speech impediment, show 
rtmarkoble progress 



RECORDER 




STINOGBAPMY PRACTICE 
Cor.lully limed diclolion exer- 
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uted o.er ond o»er OQoin Free 
the leocher for indi.iduol 
initruclioB. 




»ORIIGN lANOUAOIS 

Proper occeni ond inflection 
ore best oblomed when 
.lodents heor their own voice*, 
ond compor. their own re- 
cording, -th those of e.p." 
lingu'S's 



rlere's the most versatile teaching aid a modem school 
can own! Revere Magnetic Tape Recorder makes work and 
study in any class, from kindergarten to college, more efficient and 
more enjoyable. 

The professional quality and superior features of the new 
Revere Recorder have made it the leader in the entire educational 
field. No wonder teachers everywhere are so enthusiastic alxjut 
this remarkable equipment I 

Revere offers everything you want for ideal sch<x)l service: 
true-as-life sound reproduction . . . easy, trouble-free operation 
. . . low price and economical upkeep . . . full hour's listening on 
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advantages. 

S€?e your Revere dealer now, or write direct for complete 
information. 



Show 16 mm Cdvtational films at their Besf with 

Revere Sound Movie Projector 

HriKht. rlrnr Kcrrrn imiiRe nnii lini-nt 
'"niriiU-r Toni"" Hnund. Shown mirnt 
movitft. t«M). Kvrn younKHtpm can wt it up 
iimi <>|MTiitt' it iNiiuly. Sli|x>vcr cnrryinK 
vnur h>>ldii nrmnnrivM. <1oubU>» im ii|H'iil(pr 
Luwi>LttE to tiiikp HinRlr unit WfighinR nnly XI Iba. 




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Chicago i6 



N 1 M II K H I • \ (t I 1 M K 1 ; . I "Jo I 



11 



OPPORTUNITIES 
for Sponsored Film Distribution 

AVAILABLE THROUGH THE NATIONAL NETWORKS 
OF MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, INC. 



~ PLANT A OFriCI CMPlOYItS: Modern has pio- 
neered the regular showing of sponsored motion 
pictures to factory and office employees. In a 
single recent month. 2.300 of these groups were 
served via the "Weekly Movie Day" plan. 

n RORAl GROUPS: Sponsored films are being made 
available via Modem to 13,000 projector-equipped 
rural township high schools — plus Granges, Farm 
Bureaus. County Agents. 4-H, and FFA groups 
in this important field. 

D SCHOOLS & COUtGES: Over a half-million show- 
ings of sponsored films were certified by Modern 
in 19S0 for showings in colleges, high schools, and 
other educational institutions. 

" DEALER SERVICE: Modem's 27 regional exchanges 
provide expert film distribution service to order for 
sponsor branch offices, field organizations, and 
dealers — promoting effective tie-ins and field 
utilization. 



□ TELEVISION: Acceptable sponsored motion pic- 
tures in the public interest are being effectively 
promoted by Modem to television stations for use 
on a free sustaining basis. 



Find out how Modern services can 
economically increase the efFecilve- 
ness of your film distribution. Mall 
this convenient checklist today! 



D CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS: Modem's exclusive 
"Film of the Month" plan is actively promoting 
the regular showing of sponsored films to thou- 
sands of church groups, civic and fratemsd organi- 
zations, service clubs. PTA's, and other influential 
adult groups. 

D ROAOSHOV^S: During the summer of 1950. Mod- 
em scheduled more than 10,000 playdates for out- 
door resort and rural roadshow audiences averaging 
400 persons each in attendance. 

H HOMEMAKERS GROUPS: A specialized phase of 
Modern's film activity is devoted to the specific 
interests of home economics education in college 
and high school classes and women's groups — 
Modern now has SO motion pictures of this type 
in active circulation. 



n THEATRICAL RELEASE: Modem regularly books 
sponsored short subjects in theatres nationally. 
30,000 theatre dates for multiple showings were 
booked during 1950. 

Yes, I'd like to knovy more about these audi- 
ences for sponsored films: 

, CHECK YOUR INTERESTS) 

□ Plonl-Office Employeel D Clubi • Orgoniiolioni 
D Rurol Groupi D Roodshowi 
n School! & College! D Homemokeri Groupi 

□ Deoler Service D Theotricol Releose 
□ Televriion 



Name: 
Company: 
Address: 
City: 



-States 



Zone: 




MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE. INC. 

4S ■OCKirilllR PLAZA • NIW YORK 90, N. T. • CIrcIa 6-0*10 
mB 143 IA«T ONTABIO tllllT • CHICAOO 11, III. • SUparUr 7-OSia 

• 11 SOUTH riOWIR STRUT • LOS ANOELiS 17, CALIF. • MAditon 9-3111 



Theatres Show Gains in Both 
Number and Dollar Receipts 
♦ Willi ihcalri-s a< tivi-ly wrfciiing 
lopfliglit chort suhjccis, tin- iaifst 
U. S. Census Bureau figures on 
theatres are of interest to the busi- 
iie'.s liliii iiiduslry. 

()\er the period from 19,'W to 
I'/W the nuMilier of motion picture 
theatres increased 17 per cent to 
17,6H'>. while individual theatres 
doubled their dollar volume of re- 
ceipts. It is to be noted that much 
of the increase in total theatres is 
attributed to the growing number 
of drive-in operations. 

Kinploves increased from 128,857 
to 181. .322. and the annual payroll 
more than doubled, with an aver- 
age wage rise to 81.62.5 from the 
.S1.02I of 19.39. 

Union Labor Relations Study 
Potential for Future Pictures 

♦ Potential material for future busi- 
ness films is being gathered in a 
study of human relations problems 
of labor unions by the New York 
State School of Industrial and La- 
bor Relations at Cornell University 
ill Ithaca. Two unions participating 
in the first stages of the four-year 
research project are in the Dunkirk- 
Fredonia (N. Y. 1 area. Dunkirk 
Local No. 2693 of the United Steel- 
workers at Allegheny-Ludlum Steel 
and No. 2286 at the American Loco- 
motive Company. 

Prof. Williiam F. Whyte is proj- 
ect director and Dr. Leonard R. 
Sayles of Cornell is heading the 
field work. 

Vi hile human relations problems 
«itliiii management have been the 
siilijcct of many training films, the 
human problems of union oflicers 
and the rank and file present a rela- 
tively new field. 

Kennon Tells Accountants 
Visual Aids Sell Ideas for Them 

♦ \ i^uai aids [lilt life and rolor in- 
to the factual data of the account- 
ant in selling his ideas, the Cin- 
riiinati Chapter of the National 
Association of Cost .Accountants was 
informed by JoilN C. Kk.nnan. vice- 
president and sales director of the 
Society for Visual Edccatio.n. 



DIRECTOR WANTED 

Established commeraol lilm producer 
desires director lor industrial and 
television work. Musi be experienced. 
Send complete data as lo age. droit 
s'atus, background and salary de- 
sired. Write, 

Box 2B 

BUSINESS SCREEN 

150 E. Superior St. 

Chicago 11. 111. 



12 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



.1 



nw 




The Puerto Rico Rum Institute 
Had a Merchandising Problem 



I'KOBLKM: Tin- I'uiTtu kiiu Kum lii>titmf was alxml to launch a 
million dollar advertising and promotion cani(iaiKn. 

Importers, distributors and their salesmen had to l>e thurnuKhly 
sold on the campaign Ix-fore it hroke in tiie consumer press. 

The Institute could have used the usual mcthixl oi countless ex- 
ecutive conferences and sales meetings, pyramiding ideas and plans 
through echelon alter echelon Ircjm top to bottom. Hut the story would 



have varied at each meeting and the dramatization necessary to put 
the cam|>aign acro» would have largely depended on the ability of 
the individual holding each meeting. 

SOLl'TION: The Institute wisely jnit the whole <lramatic story on 
lilm, tele>co|K-d a li>ng 'lO-minute .sales meeting into 15 minutes .... 
each minute carefully edited and jiacked with interest and information. 
With no wastc<l wor«!s, the st<iry was told just as Institute executives 
had planned, .hid they iin'i'rcd the country in iusi .' itxfks. 



1 1 you have a problem, if you want to imi)rove your mclhiKl of telling your story to 

dealers, salesmen and customers ... We'd like to study your problent -Xnd oflFer 

a solution. 

Films for Industry, Inc. 

NEW YORK- 135 WEST 52nd STREET • PLAZA 3-2800 
PHILADELPHIA— 1700 WALNUTSTREET • KINGSLEY 5083 1 



Nl' M BE R 1 • \ ti I I M h \ : ' I ">.1 I 



IS 



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PREtlOINT 



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MPRO Stii£LkL 16 




LIGHTWEIGHT, COMPACT... FAST, EASY SET-UP . . . 

weinhsonly 29 lbs An office boy can set 

a woman can carry it! i( up ready to run in 
seconds! 




run HOUR SHOWINGS . . 

without interrupting patented "film cradle" 

>. nn m r\#>rK lilm ti~\f~«* 



for reel changes! 



EASIEST TO THREAD., 
patented "film crat 
pampers film, too! 




Serves Six Vital Management Heeds 
Effectiyely, Easily, Economically! 

• Job Training • Personnel Relations • Product Marketing 

• Public Relations • Production Problems • Sales Training 

High-salaried executives and small businessmen alike agree that 
Ampro's Stylist is the standout projector buy . . . and we've the 
letters to prove it! 

The amazing Stylist is so light that your secretary can carry it 
with ease— weighs only 29 lbs. And Ampro's patented film cradle 
makes damaged film a near impossibility — threading is foolproof, 
too! Best yet, you can enjoy full hour showings without reel change. 
Add advantages like fast, easy set-up and simple centralized con- 
trols—you've got a lasting projector value by all comparisons. 

Put the Stylist to work on the six jobs listed above. S'^'VfOO 
Get the facts— fill out the coupon for today's mail! '•## J 

Complete with 8" Speoker and Carrying Cose 

— MAIL COUPOH! WRITE NOW!— 

Ampro Corporation "*■' 

2835 N. Western Ave., Chicago 18, III. 

Ku%h mc I KM: illustraicii literature on the 

jina/inj^ Afiiprt* Siylisl projector for industrial 

use . . . also folder on Ampro Model 690 Power 

Speaker. 




CENTRAIIZED CONTROLS... UNCONDITIONALIY GUAR- 

handy panel arrange- AMHCO BY AMPRO . . . 

mcni puts cverythin>{ uxain^I defeciivc ma- 

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Ampro 



AMr«0 COIPORATION 

fC.n.ro'Pf»Cii.onfqu.p Cofp Subudtarf) 

Bmm Cam«rat and Projedort 

Slid* Proi«cloft • 16mm Sound-on-fllfn 

Tope Recorders 



Same. 



AJJrew. 



(ilt. 



.Zone. 



.Stale. 



REPORT ALL NEW TECHNICAL AND TRAINING FILMS TO BUSINESS SCRKEN 



* A complete registry of all existing technical and 
training motion pirturo produced by and (or busi- 
ness and industrial purposes is maintained by the 
Editors of Business Screen. Please notify us of any 



new pictures completed, whether for internal or 
external use. so this listing can he maintained for 
the benefit of all. .Vdtlress all nolires to: Index 
of Training Films, 150 E. Superior, Chicago 1 1. III. 



Food Chains Association Uses 
Lowly "Spud" to Tell o Story 

♦ I lie iMMilliii^' III fund ill n-lail 
cliuiii Rti>re» is the subject of Tlif 
S/nid and You, sponsored by the 
National Association of Foon 
ClIAI.NS. It is not a story about pota- 
toes. The "spud" comes into the pic- 
ture when an aspiring "<ub" is 
promised a reporlorial job if he 
can dig up a front-page yarn out of 
the plebeian potato. At farms, fac- 
tories and food stores the story of 
modern fnod distribution unfolds. 

Caterpillar Drops Organized 
Classes for Sales Training 

♦ The Catkki'ili.ak Thai. Kilt (Com- 
pany of Peoria. III., is suspending 
organized sales training classes in 
the Sales Training Division, and 
all other functions of the division 
are being transferred to the Sales 
Development Division, of which 
C. E. Jones has charge. Vice Pres- 
ident Gail E. Spain reported a sharp 
drop in requests for such training. 

This Film Has Greater Draw 
Than It Had Five Years Ago 

♦ I'lie iiuluslrv is familiar willi the 
success story of Eternally Yours. 
sponsored by A. M. Byeus Com- 
pany, Pittsburgh, makers of w rouglit 
iron. What may not be known. 
however, is that the number of per- 
sons who saw- the 16mm sound film 
in 1950 was 65 per cent greater than 
when the production was made five 
years ago. and that the audience 
total has increased each year. 

f)ne hundred prints are in circu- 
LiliiiM today. The picture has been 
shown 2.0{)() times, to 100.000 i)er- 
soiis. chiedv technical and profes- 
sional groups, industrial plant per- 
sonnel, university engineering 
students and civic clubs. 

Thus, with no disturbance of mill 
routine, a host of "sightseers" has 
been guided through the plant — by 
screen and has seen in film the 
I'MilulioM and manufacture of the 
oldest ferrous metal for uses rang- 
ing from plates for smokestacks to 
pipe for snow-melting installations. 

Naliiinal distribution is by Mod- 
ern Talking Picture Service. Inc., 
via 27 exchanges. 

Rerolled Rail Steel Statistics 

♦ Slii[)iiients of rerolled rail steel 
totaled M^).(M^ net tons in 1').50. an 
increase of more than 40 per cent 
over the amount used in 19-W). The 
total for last year, with November 
and December tonnage estimated. i> 
from the Kaii. ."^tkki. Bar Associa 
TION. as published in the "Iron 
Age," and inchales concrete bars. 

^carbon bars and other products. 
The figures correct the amount 
given in discussion of the film Rail 
Sirel in the ff'orld of Today, in' 
BlsiNESs ScKKEN Issue Number ft. 



I 



14 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A <; A Z 1 N K 



1 



FEED-OMATIC 
CONVEYOR — 




POINTtX* 
PROJECTION POINTER 



ELIMINATE MOUNTING AND 

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VU-LYTE 

^ Opaque Projector 



\ 1. 



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Fan action of the B*t«l«r 
VACUMATIC PLATEN* not 
only hoidt copy flat cjuring 
projection, but kccpi inte- 
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uolly cool. 



AH copy is held absolutely flat on the 
VACUMATIC PLATEN of this ultra-modern 
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As you handle the superb new VU-LYTE, 
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VU-LYTE the most modern and most versatile 
of visual teaching tools. 

Yes, Beseler explored every line in bringing 
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For instance: 




1. YOU CAN use the VU-LYTE in a parlially- 
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end brilliant colon — become VU-IYTE pro- 
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2. ^OU CAN feed miied or conlinuout copy 
through smoothly, without light flothet, 

by means of the Beseler FEEO-O-MATIC* 
metal bell CONVEYOR. A full 8', .11 page 
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with equol eose, without flutter. 



3. ^OU CAN project a lighted orrow onto 
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These advanced, exclusive features, plus others, arc incorporated in 
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truly new concept in opaque projection a*k for booklet F 



CHARLES 



Co<5:d<s^£5^ 



COMPANY 



60 Bodgar Avanuo, Naworli t, N. J. 
T»e tyor/di lorgesf Ma. .roOerer of Op.q.e Pro/.cfle. fq.lp...f 



M MRKR I 



vol I \1 K I 



I •) .1 I 



IS 




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43 YEARS AGO, (long before 



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IN FACT, HOLLYWOOD FILM 
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.ii the fin/ commercial Idmm taborator\. lloltyuooJ iilw 
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Of all the existing film laboratories, only Hollywood 
Film con point to a history of outstanding leadership 
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LAB 








WORK 








SINCI 








1907 


II 


r\i 1 \i\kii\r\r\ 




If wot 1937 when Cloro Bow 
won fame a« the "IT" girl from 
the picture of the kome nome. 



HOLLYWOOD FILM ENTERPRISES, INC. 

6060 SUNSET BLVD. . HOLLYWOOD 28, CALIF. 



NOW THERE'S A COMPLETE FARM 

*• Nearly l.KX) availalilr free and low-cost nuitiun 
pirturcs and tjiiii-filin- ami their souhcm are listed 
in the new Farm Kilni Guide recently added to 
the Film Guide Lihrary of Business Screen. Sent 



FILM GUIDE FOR REFERENCE USE 

postpaid at only .SO*" per copy Ion re<cipt of stamps, 
coin, money order, or company check I . Order vour 
copy today from Business Screen, 15() H Superior, 
Chicago 11. Discount on quantity orders. 



"Tommy Tucker" at Luncheon 

♦ A f;ue>.| luncheon was the occa- 
sion for the premiere of The Case 
of Tommy Tucker, the Chrysler 
Corporation's new screen approach 
to safety education. The Plymouth 
l)i\isi<iii was host al the evi-nl on 
Feliruary 6 al the HIackstone Hotel 
in Chicago. 

« • • 

Ad Women Plan Color Film 

♦ A sound and color film on Ad- 
vert isinp 0.5 a I ovation is to be 
sponsored hy the Women's Adver- 
tising Ci-UB OF Chicago. Serving 
as consultants are authorities in ad- 
vertising and education. The film, 
for screening in schools, is to be 
made b\ Dallas Jones Productions, 
Inc., for showing b) ;\pril in Chi- 
cago, with prints available to ad 
clubs in other cities. 

» • • 

Eye-Catcher Sales Aid Is Theme 

♦ Point of purchase advertising as 
a contribution to retail sales is the 
message in Eye Catchers Are Sales 
Catchers. ].5-niinute color and sound 
slidefilni newly produced by the 
Poi.NT OF Purchase Advertising 
Institute with the help of a com- 
mittee of advertising and merchan- 
dising executives of national adver- 
tisers and editors. 

hujuiries on loan of the film 
should be addressed to J. Kingslev 
Gould. Kxecutive Secretary. Point 
of Purchase Advertising Institute, 
\(> E. 43rd St., New York City. 
* » • 

1,254,745 See Four Productions 
Of U.S. Home Economics Bureau 

♦ Some 1.2St.7f5 persons in 18.466 
audiences last year saw four motion 
pictures sponsored by the Bureau 
OF Human Nutrition and Home 
Economics which are among re- 
leases of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and a fifth production, 
Something You Didn't Eat, which 
the Bureau helped the \^'alt Disney 
Studios to make. The four Bureau 
films are Research jor Better Living, 
Freezing Fruits and Vegetables, A 
Step-Saving Kitchen, and Truly 
Yours — The Dress That Fits. 

The Bureau has placed prints of 
some of these films in state film li- 
braries for loan and uses a selection 
of the subjects to show the 2.000 an- 
nual visitors at the .Agricultural Re- 
search Center in Beltsville, Md., 
which conducts research on food and 
nutrition, textiles, and housing and 
household equipment. 

Extension Services and teachers 
of large groups, primarily in home 
economics, are the chief users of the 
films. Research for Better Living 
acquaints college classes and asso- 
ciations with opportunities in the 
Bureau's fields. 



16 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



P""-WITH THESE „,,« 
,\Tm HANDS" j^wHcii 




WHY NOT 
A PICTURE WITH HEART 

To Tell Your Stoty? 

Promotional Films Company's production "WITH THESE HANDS" 
has been an outstanding success in telling the story of men and women 
of the International Ladies Garment Workers' Union in warm, human 
terms. It was originally planned to be shown onl\ to members of the 
union, but on its merit as dramatic entertainment . . . 

• // played four weeks on Broadway as a theatrical feature. 

• // is nou showing in theatres across the country. 

• // is playing an imp<irtant part in our fight against communism 
in Europe. 

YOUR STORY CAN BE TOLD IN HUMAN TERMS 

Perhaps your public relations or training story needs to be told in just 
this way ... in terms of real people . . . people with heart! 

INVITATION: Before planning your next film on human 
problems or achievements we'd like you to see "With These 
Hands. " Why not write or telephone today for a screening.-* 



PFC 



PRODUCTIONS 
149 WEST Slsl STREET . NEW YORK 19 NY. . PLflZA 7-3351-2 




■BEST TlilNCi Ui IK^ KIND" 

— New York Po 




IMPRESSIVE DOCUMENT" 

— New York Tirn 




•INTERESTINC, AND MOVING 

— New York Herald Tribu, 




"RICH IN DRAMA — EXCELLENT ■ 

— r 



4» ^ 



'M 







Ihe demand for fast, dependable, quality 
motion picture film processing is rapidly in- 
creasing in every community throughout the 
country, presenting an excellent opportunity 
for wide-awake film producers and local labora- 
tories. The Houston-Fearless Model 22 Devel- 
oper shown above makes it possible to provide 
this profitable service in your area with only a 
moderate investment. 

This fKjrtable machine develops l6mm black 
and white, negative, positive or reversal films. 



HOUSTON 
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It is self-contained, entirely automatic and easy 
to operate. Complete refrigeration, re-circulat- 
ing systems, air compressor and positive tem- 
perature controls. Operates in daylight, han- 
dling the entire job from camera to screen. 
Model 22 is the same high Houston-Fearless 
quality that has been standard of the motion 
picture industry in Hollywood and throughout 
the world for 20 years. Other I6mm and 33mm 
Houston-Fearless black and white and color 
equipment toserveyourparticular requirements. 

Write for information on specially-built 
equipment for your specific needs. 



• DEVELOPING MACHINES • COLOR PRINTERS • FRICTION HEADS 

• COLOR DEVELOPERS • DOLLIES 'TRIPODS • PRINTERS • CRANES 



11801 W. OLYMPIC BLVD • LOS ANGELES 64, CALIF. 

'WORLDS LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF MOTION PICTURE PROCESSING EQUIPMENT" 



A BUSINESS FILM REFERENCE AND RESEARCH LIBRARY AT YOUR SERVICE 

Write today for complete details on the Film Guide s<-rvices have now been improved to meet your needs. 

Library and the Business Film Bookshelf Services Address: Film Guide Library, Business Screen, 150 

available to subscribers. These economical reference E. Superior, Chicago 11. Write today— don't delay! 



Accountants Armchair Tour 
Sees Textile Mills on Screen 

♦ I lircc -uuiid liliris of the lexlil 
industry were presented to a gather 
iiig of New York accountants Fi'l 
ruarN 6 to familiarize ihcm uil' 
llic «<irk of fabric mills as it iiii 
pitigcs on tlifir profession. 

One week later those attend In 
the showing, which was arranfjei 
by Michael A. C. Hume, direcln 
of education of the New Yor 
Chapter of the National Assoii;i 
lion of Cr)st .'Xccountants, will par 
tici|)ale in a forum session to h 
addressed by John Trub of lli 
S. D. I^idcsdorf Company. 

The three films shown were Dea 
Miss Markham, in color, made fo 
the Fepperell Manufacturing Corn 
pany: How Rayon Is Made, spon 
sored by the American Viscose C<>r 
jjoration, and Wool, color filrr 
Deeririg-Milliken & Company. Im 

Ad Agency Gives Businessmen 
Weapon to Fight Socialism 

♦ I'riividing an audio-visual weu| 
on with which businessmen of al 
levels may help to take the en 
out of socialism and sell Americ. 
back to the Americans was the pur 
pose ill making the color and soun 
slidefilrn Land of the Free, the De 
Iroit Adcraft Club was told at . 
luncheon by Hubert F. Roy of Ros 
Roy, Inc. His advertising agenc; 
made the picture as a public rela 
tions tool for employes and com 
munity. The apjiroach is twofold 
case histories of fallen nations ani ' 
the story of » typical Amerii i 
family. 

"You have had many speakers. I 
Roy said, "who have deinonstral' 
that we are going hell-bent dou 
the one-way path to socialism. W' 
knew that all businessmen wouli 
have to fight it if it was going t 
be licked, and we derided to niak' 
at least one tool available for then 
to start doing the job." 

The speaker told the club mem 
bers one company is showing th' 
film to its 11.000 employes ove 
a six-week period, and a depart 
ment store has offered the progran 
to every metropolitan Detroi 
school, is supplying it also to sub 
urban and parochial schools. an< 
has given two sets to the puhli 
library for loan to organizationt 

Ad Program Value Is Theme 

♦ IIow a company's advertisin 
program tics in with the sales At 
partnient and can affect each salet 
man was the subject covered i 
sound slidefilrn and motion piclur 
supplementing an address before th 
."^alt Lake Advertising Club b 
Gkokc.k H. Finch, vice president i 
charge of sales development fof th 
Jam Handy Orcamzation. 



18 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIN 



HERE AT LAST! 



America's Finest 
Duplicating Film! 




ANSCO, BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK. A DIVISION OF 



GENERAL ANILINE & FILM CORPORATION. "FROM RESEARCH TO REALITY. 



NUMBER 1 • V01,1;ME 12 • 19S1 



19 



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05 



AUDIO PRODUCTIOIMS, I IM C 

PROni (KRS OF MOTION P I C T T R E S 

630 NINTH AVKNl K • K I I. M < KNTKH HI I I. 1) I X; • NKW ^ORK, N.Y. 



20 



HI ^INKSS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



RKSI'ON'^KS Fhom Hi sinkss film prdduccrs 
tlirmigliDUt (III- ('i>uiilr\ cm ihr fiirllirdiii- 
ing Production Ycarliook [jroject of 
Bl.>l.NESS ScRKK.N indicate ttic many important 
developments which have taken place in our 
iiKlustrx during the past dciadi- whirh includes 
the era of Viorlrl War II. 

F'or example, the extent to which these experi- 
enced and responsible companies have pro- 
duced films for every conceivable kind of pub- 
lic service and <!overnmental i>r>2ani/ation is 
heinf; re\ealed in thes«- authoritative survey 
returns. Nearly 4.(M)0 individual reels of origi- 
nal |)roduction were turned out bv less than 
fift\ of the companies for the Armed Forces 
or war agencies during the period 1942 to 
194.1: thousands of additional reels have been 
produced by these and other companies for 
local, stale and Federal agencies, health and 
welfare organizations, and for industrial train- 
ing, morale, and business communications. 

This is the backbone of the entire factual 
film industry in the I nited States: it is the 
-inew and fibre of our national strength im- 
proved through better understanding of the 
many complex facts preseiiteti in their films. 

As Henry Strauss of Palhescope Produc- 
tions points <iut. "these big pr(d)lenis face our 
counlrv todav: individual man hour proline- 
litily; sliortaae of material: and i/nalilY of 
norh. Our industry has been operating in these 
areas on a wide scale these past five years. 

"In addition to reijuiring knowledge of how 
to affect emotion \ia film, the prime requisite 
is an ex|HTl knowledge of inilustrial relations 
and of induslrv itself." he sa\s. 

There is no other comparable film industry 
anywhere in the world, outside these I nited 
.States and Canada. We intend to refle<'t our 
|>ride in it with the solid substance of factual 
data, essential reference, and claritv of presen- 
tation that will, in the pages of this first annual 
Production Yearbook, clearly establish the value 
and extent of these companies and their services. 

Fdm Producers Meet Ran Stock Problems 

■¥■ Because practical makers of business and 
fai'tual films have long been accustomed to de- 
livering the most for the customer's film dollar, 
current raw film shortages have not yet made 
any serious inroads on factual film production 
or distribution. \ notiieable lightening up i>ii 
|Hissible waste or duplication has been taking 
place in both laboratories and studios, however, 
with all factors of the industry alert to any fur- 
ther cuts such as the contemplated DuPont slash 
of twenty-five [KTcent in cur-lomer film alloca- 
tions. ( \-ray and armed forces re<|uirc-ments 
were given as the reason for the DuPont short- 
age. I Much more loncern was exhibited mean- 
while by Hollywood entertainment producers, 
the newsreels. and by TV stations which now 
consume a verv large amount of 16mm st«Kk 
for their filmed tranwriplions cif nearly every- 
thing l>eing telecast, including the trash. 

Natiotiul .-/-I' Convention Opens July 2S 

* The I'KSI National \udio-Visual (!on\en- 
lion and Trade .Show will again Im' held in 
Chicago at (he Sherman Motel, o|H-ning July 
2'! and continuing through JuK .'U. PrimariU 
attended bv visual education dealers and mem- 




The national defense era exemplified in a still from "Epilopue" protluced h\ Raphael G. If olff. 

\]M^ M ill ltii^iii(\s^ llliiis 

PKODI CIKtN IKMntdOK lilllHNs INDICMK PHODl CKKS' KSSKN I I M i;<MI 



bers of their staffs, coincidental meetings of 
the Kducatioiial Film Librarv Association and 
of the l)e|inrlment of Audio-Visual Instruction. 
National Kducalion Association, have given the 
annual affair a strong consumer flavor in the 
past. Principal marmfacturcrs of audio-visual 
ei|uipmerit in the Chicago area also take this 
occasion to hold their annual dealer meetings. 

Projection Equipment in Fair Supply 

♦ incidentalK . supplie> of projection equip- 
ment and essential acces.sories continue to be 
availabli- in fair <|uanlitN. despite im|H-n<ling 
National Production Autlioritv limilatioiis on 
irilical materials. Maiiufaiturers geni-rall\ es- 
timate that equi|unent needs will Iw taken care 
of with only slight delays for the next six 
inonlhs. \fler that, it was an\bod>'s guess as 
III the turn iif e\eii|s alllmugh it is generalK 
considered that am audiii-\ isual equipment 
needed for industrial training, enqiloyee indoc- 
trination, or civilian health and welfare pur- 
poses would receive first consideration bv the 
NP\. \t prcM-nl. under existing metals orders, 
no distinction is made as to civilian end use. 
as belween lovs and industrial equipment, for 
example. Thi- !)0 ( Hefens*- Order I «\s|eni nf 
ratings apjx-ars likeU to Ix- extended farther to 
cover this problem if manufacturers are unable 
to get materials for production of more ps,vn- 
lial goods. This would Ik- a logical step. 



News Items of Importance at Press Time: 

M The Standard Oil Company < Indiana t is 
<'onducting a model Training Clinic for com- 
pan\ advertising and public relations repre- 
sentatives at its Chicago Training ("enter. 
Ileavv emphasis was given audio-visual male- 
rials, now l>eing widely used in the field by this 
companv for a wide range of purpos<-s. 

M Nominations for "distinctive achievement in 
dm umenlarv production of short subje< Is" by 
the .Motion Picture Academy narrowed the final 
"Oscar" coni|H'lition down to The Fifihl: Science 
iiiainst Cancer: The Stairs: and U h\ Korea'/ 
Feature diKumentarv nominations included only 
two subjeits: The Titan: Story of Mirhelanfirlo 
and U ith These Hands, the II.CWl motion pic- 
lure ( reviewed in a r«Tenl issue of Bl sinuss 
ScRFKVl. BaUols were to go into the mail for 
final selections on FVbruarv 27. 
♦ The trusli-e- of the (rt-orge Kastman IIoum-, 
national photographic institute, have amiouncnl 
the formal o^iening ceremonies of the Dry den 
Theatre in RiK-hester. N.Y. on March 2. I')5I. 
I.owell Thomas, author, world traveler, and 
news commentator, will lie the principal siirak- 
er. Among guests of honor announceil to dale 
are F.dward Sleii-lien. renov«ned piclorialisi: 
Merrill C. Meigs, v ice-president of ihe Hearst 
(!or|Hiralion: and Ceorge B. Drvden of Kvans- 
lon. Illinois. whoM- conlrihuled funds made 
possible this iiukIcI theatre. • 



NUMBER I • \OLlIME i: • 1951 



21 



Public Relations' 
Audio -Visual Clinic 

IMJtx.KVM UN n I;M)\N. 1 l-lfUl Vin 27 

ADXKKTISINC, »ali'#. industrial and pul> 
li. rilalioiis t-xttulivcs in the Cliitago an-a 
and llu- iiiidwfM will l«- puosts i>( lllf Chi- 
cago C.liapl.T i.f llu- I'liMii K.'lalioiis Socicly of 
Aim-riia on lucsda). K<l.ruar> 27. wluri that 
organization sponsors its first annual Audio- 
visual Clinic dav in the Tfrrace Casino of tlif 
Morrison Hotel. The "welcome" mat is out for 
mi<lw.-st.rn a.l and agency executive's who wish 
lo attend the program with a modest S.S.<H) all- 
inclusive fee the only charge. Kohert Carey. 
PRS.-V vice-president, of the Ho/ell-Jacobs A<1- 
verlising Agency, is handling all guest arrange- 
meuts. Ticket price includes luncheon and cock- 
tail as well as all meetings from 9:30 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m. closing. 

Fartici|>ants in the days events include Mr. 
James I'eddar. vice-president in charge of ad- 
vertising and public relations for the Dearborn 
Motors Corporation, who will present an inte- 
grated audiovisual program. "Salute to Agri- 
culture": Nicholas Farrino. former picture edi- 
tor of Nkwswkkk and now head of the Photo- 
graphic Library of Cities Service Company, who 
will show and discuss this extensive facility: 
John Kettlewell of the Council on Candy: Sam- 
uel Austin of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange: 
Homer Huntington of the Poultry and Egg Na- 
tional Board: (ieorge Keitinger. public relations 
director of Swift & Company: Tom Hope of 
General Mills: and executives of the Illinois Bell 
Telephone Company; Electro-Motive Division, 
(ieneral Motors: and the Lumbermen's Mutual 
Insurance Company. 

"New Horizon^ for Sponsored Films" 
Frank Arlinghaus. president of Modern Talk- 
ing Piiture Service. Inc.. is the featured speak- 
er on "New Horizons for Sponsored Films" at 
the luncheon meeting. 

The afternoon program will center on exter- 
nal or public relations material, including con- 
sumer education, institutional fdms, and com- 
munity relations whereas the morning sessions 
will maiidv center on internal, industrial rela- 
tions, .stockholder information, and employee in- 
formation programs utilizing all forms of audio- 
visual aids. The practical aspect will be stressed 
in every instance, with specific fai-ts on costs and 
results to be given by participants from their 
extensive experiences with these media. 

The closing event of the day will bring execu- 
tives of all leading film producers into a panel 
discussion on "Client-Producer Responsibilities." 
O. H. CcH'Un. BlsiNKss Scrken, is moderator of 
the producer-client panel. 

Audio-Visual KquipnienI on Kxliibition 
All lv|>e^ of modern au<lio-visual projection 
equipment will be displayed in a special exhibit 
area arranged for the (-liiiic by leading manu- 
facturers in the Chicago area. Guests will In- 
supplied with a special kit of literature. 

The Audio-Visual Clinic day, which originat- 
ed following the similar but very limited panel 
held at the PRS.A annual convention in New 




'iiirk ia^l December, is aimed to give the pub- 
lic relations and ad executives an overview of 
these potent tools for idea <ommunication rang- 
ing from emplovee and public methods and ma- 
terials to television. An expected attendance of 
from 200 to 300 executives has been provided 
for by the sponsors. 



A New Heinz Company Picture 
Presents Story of "The Big Kitchen" 



Sponsor: H. J. Heinz Company. 
Title: The liiji Kilchcn. 26 min.. color. Pro- 
duced by Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

■K It is good to be reminded that America is a 
land of plenty and that the farmer who grows 
our food and the processor who prepares it for 
our table both represent solid, forward-looking 
Americanism. In The Rip Kitchen, which gets 
its natne from the nationwide locations of the 
Heinz processing plants, the company brings the 
story of our agricultural economy down to 
cases by elucidating the values of processed 
foods in nutrition and thrift. 

Two Years in Preparation 
Both sponsor and producer (Wilding Pi<luri- 
Productions. Inc.) made a thorough job of il. 
I'rcparati<in began two years ago, and iIm- 
"travelogue" covers Heinz factories and con- 
tributing farms from coast to coast. 

There's the vinegar-making area of Virginia, 
with the Apple Blossom Festival at Winchester 
and the Shenandoah Valley with its national 
shrines. The company has come a long way 
since it began making its first product, horse- 
radish, and the harvesting of the horseradish 
crop about .Muscatine, Iowa, points up the fact. 
Tomato and baby food manufactures take the 
audience to New York. New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania and Ohio. At Bowling Green, center of 
Heinz research on tomatoes and other plants for 
pickles, are acres li'.crally under glass. I he 
camera moves on to California, the San Joaquin 
Valley and the Frontier Days celebration, and 
finally covers the Tulip Time observance at 
Holland. Mich., which is also called the world's 
pii'klc capital. 

.\vailuble Through National Sources 

Through the branihi-s of the Modern Talking 
Picture Service. Inc.. The liiji Kilrlu'n will show 
lo consumer groups including schools, associa- 
ti<ins, women's grou|>s. granges and service or- 
ganizations, as well as to grocers, hotel and 
restaurant staffs and others in the business of 
handling foods. 



Annual Meeting of 
lAVA March 19-21 

\T CIIICAGOS KI)(;KW.VrEK BEACH 

MI.MBI'.KS and guests of Uie Industrial 
Audio-Visual Association, national or- 
ganization of sponsors of business films 
and ri'lated audio-visual media, will hold the 
annual meeting of that group at (Chicago's Edge- 
water Beach Hole! on March 19-20-21. In ad- 
dition to the national business meeting and 
annual election of officers, an extensive pro- 
gram of demonstrations, exhibits, film showings, 
and laboratory forums has been arranged for 
the three-day event. 

Special emphasis is being given the practical 
problems faced by business film users in this 
national defense era. A majority of these clinic 
programs and discussion forums will be open 
lo guests representing other companies now 
using or contein|)laling film programs in busi- 
ness and industrv. .Members of those firms ac- 
tually providing audio-visual services and equip- 
ment, advertising agencies, and trade associations 
are not eligible for membership. 

Company film and TV representatives, not 
inembers of lAVA. but desiring further infor- 
mation on the Chicago meeting should corre- 
spond at once with Frank S. Rollins. E. R. 
Squibb & Sons. 745 Fifth Avenue, New York 
City, or with Donald Steinke. lAVA secretary, 
c/o Dow Chemical Company. Midland. Mich. 

Mendiersliip Review Forums Featured 

lAVA members will discuss such pertinent 
subjects as the effects of defense production on 
company film programs: publicizing the busi- 
ness film: tie-in promotion and related media 
for compan\ film programs: and new develop- 
ments in film pro(lucti<iii technique. 

An Audio-Visual Projection Clinic in which 
members will demonstrate many unusual types 
of projection equipment now in use by their 
companies is another feature of the meeting. A 
demonstratiBn of the potentialities of Phone- 
vision is another program event. 

Internal Status of Film Divisions 

"Where Does the Film Division Belong in a 
Company" is another subject scheduled for panel 
discussion. In addition, one program will be 
<levoted to a series of interviews and demon- 
strations conducted by a large Chicago busi- 
ness film studio. Wilding Picture Productions. 
Inc.. when- members and guests will hear from 
a number of experts on production, procure- 
jiieiit. and other related problems. 

.A thorough review of all Washington develop- 
ments relating to audio-visual media including 
ihi- production programs of the Armed Forces, 
instructional film research at Penn Slate Col- 
lege, distribution and utilization developments 
in the bases and camps, will also be reviewed in 
special short-course programs arranged for mem- 
bers and guests of the association. 

Prominent |)ersoiialities in the business film 
field will address several luncheon meetings 
scheduled during the session. These arrange- < 
ments are under the diriftion of O. H. Coelln, 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



chairman in charge of program arrangements. 
Assisting in preparations for the Chicago meet- 
ing were lAVA ])resi(lent R. P. Hogan, W. M. 
Raslahle. retired president; F'rank Greeiileaf. and 
John Hawkinson. treasurer. Don ."^teinke, Dow- 
Chemical Company, is secretary of the nutional 
sponsor organization. * 



blsi.\e:s«^ S4 iik 



Modern Miracles of Die Casting Are 
Shown in New Doehler-Jarvis Picture 



Sponsor: Doehler-Jarvis Corporation. 

Title: The Shortest Way, 27 min., b&w, pro- 
duced In The Jam Handy Organization. 
* Although die casting is playing- an increas- 
ing role in the manufacture of almost every 
tvpe of hard goods, it is still in its infancy. 

"We acknowledge this." Mr. II. H. Doehler, 
Board Chairman of Doehler-Jarvis. said re- 
cently, "but history has taught us that in times 
gone hv there were such periods as the Stone 
Age, Bronze Age, iron Age, and the age of 
today. .Steel. I shall not he greatly surprised 
to see the age upon which we are embarking 
now turn out to be labeled the Light .Metal 
Age.' 

Prepared to Exceed War Records 

During the conversion of industry to war 
materials production the die casting industry is 
prepared to far surpass its excellent record in 
World War II. During 1041-45. the Doehler- 
Jarvis Corp. produced some 'J,3(X) components 
for the military machine. Its products can now 
be found in thousands of items of every day 
use in homes, motor cars, offices an<l factories. 

Crafihic evidence of die casting's progress 
in industrial production is shown in a new mo- 
lion picture. The Shortest Way. It shows how 
raw materials are made into finished products 
in a matter of seconds. 

Ii<-gimiiiig at the basis for the process, molten 
allovs of aluminum, zinc, magnesium or brass 
are shown being forced under pressure into a 
steel die. This sometimes completes the prod- 
uct at one step, or the castings may be finished 
b\ trimming, plating or buffing. 

Wide Range of Products .\re Shown 

Knd products are shown, from such things as 
projei-tors. slide viewers, cameras an<l editing 
machines to Washing machines, gas pumps, elec- 
Iric trains. tNpcwriiers and kilrheii appliances. 
I'rimdest accomplishments of Doehler-Jarvis are 
»liown as the one piece casting of an automo- 
bile door and the group of cIos«> tolerance cast- 
ings which are essential housings of Ifydra- 
matic. Bcirg-\\ arner. Dwialbnv atid I Itrainalic 
automatic transmissions. 

The Shortest U ay was made for the use of 
technical societies. us«'rs and prospc<-tive u.sers 
of die castings, product engineers, technical stu- 
dents and other grou|>s interested in modern 
mami fact u ring processor. 

It may be procured from sales or plant man- 
agers at Doehlcr-Jar\ is plants in Toledo. Ohio; 
I'otlslown. I'a.: Batavia. N. Y.: Chicago. 111. 
and Grand Rapids, Mich., or from Doehler- 
Jarvis Department of Public Relations. .1fW> 
Fourth .Avenue, New York Citv. 




fi.ahf:hty fkstinai. monoks 

iVniLK UI- TIIL UUCl .Mi:.M AK^" 

•k .Members of the Screen Directors Guild made 
history on two counts last month when they 
staged the Flaherty Film Festival in honor of 
"The Father of the Documentary" pioneer film 
maker Robert Flahertv at New- York's Mus<'um 
of Modern Art. It was the first one-man cini-ma 
show ever staged in ,-\merica; it was also the 
first time all of Flaherty's great films ha\e been 
gathered t<^igether for one three-part showing. 
The Festival was held to packed hous<'s on Jan- 
uary 9. 10, and 11. 

Mr. Flaherty appeared each night to discuss 
his films with the audience and on thi- closing 
night he was presented with a special award 
and a paid-up life membership card from his 
fellow members of the Screen Directors Guild. 
The citation read in part "his example serves as 
a beacon light ... to elevate the art and craft of 
our profession. " Moderators of tin- Festival were 
Gilbert Seldes. author and critic, and Dr. Charles 
A. Siepmann. N. Y. University F'ilm Library. 



(:nHISI(UMIl.K ITI.M IN DEM A.N I) 

"^(»l <;*\ ciiwi.i- rilK woKl.li," jumnl mu- 
liim iiirtiin- rftiilitioii of h'lilhi-r Janifs Ki-I- 
Irr'x inspirational nifssafti- to Ann'ricans 
I noti- cast Ufloiil, is in its si'ronil thoiisiiiiil 
prints solil anil in usi- h\ autlivnti-s tlirotifih- 
out the country. 




era 





I.N THK IMCTl RE>* 

ABOVE: Faniril film makrr Rob- 
rrt FInhi'rtY I rmtrr I rro'ives 
C.iTtifirnlf of Honor of ihf 
Sir4<ii IHniiors (iuiltl froni 
Six, prrsiilrnt Jack (ilcnn at 
recent Flaherty Film Festival; 
to the left is Paul Falkenherf. 
SI Hi Forums chairman. l.VVT. 

1 famous still phottifirapher. 

Mar/iaret Hourke-lJ hite. /ireels 
the father of the iliHumenlary 
film at till- recent Flaherty Film 
Festival ichere she joined icith 
other tcell-knoicn personalities 
in paying homafir to the veteran 
cinematisl. 



I)KI\ER EmCATloN I MM F'KKM E 

(.K\KK\I. motors' driver education film series 
was previeiceil in l.os tiifieles uniler the aus- 
pices of Hon W. House, president of linal (.' W 
C7ii/». .S/i,»irfi lielou- 1 1 to ri Marshall (.ran- 
shiiic. I. I schools: Mr. House: Henry t'larl. 
anil Tom (ulhii ol t^M i itmpanies: ami Ih 
T. ir , Forbes. 1(11 liislitiil,- of Traffic. 




M M B E R I 



V Of I M F 12 • I ") S I 



23 



Public Relations' 
Audio -Visual Clinic 

i'Kt)(;i{\M ON n i;si)\^. 1 1 itui \in 2: 

ADM.KTISING, sales, industrial and pul.- 
li.- nlutioiis fXiHUtivfs in tlu- Cliicapo area 
iiiul tin- iiii<l»<->t will l'<- jjuisis of llii- Clii- 
cago CliapliT of till- I'liMii K.lations SociolN of 
Anu-rira on lucstla). I'<l)ruary 27. when llial 
organization sponsors its first annual Amlio- 
Visual Clinii- day in the Terrace Casino of the 
Morrison Hotel. The "welcome" mat is out for 
midwi-sl.rn a«l and agemy exetutives who wish 
to attend the program with a modest S5.(M) all- 
inclusive fee the only charge. Kohcrt Carey. 
PRSA vice-president, of the Hozell-Jarobs Ad- 
vertising Agency, is handling all guest arrange- 
ments. Ticket price includes luncheon and cock- 
tail as well as all meetings from yi-SO a.m. to 
5:.30 p.m. closing. 

ParticijMints in the da>s events include Mr. 
James IVddar, vice-president in charge of ad- 
vertising and public relations for the Dearborn 
Motors Corporation, who will present an inte- 
grated audio-visual program. "Salute to Agri- 
culture": Nicholas Farrino. former picture edi- 
tor of Nkwswkkk and now head of the Photo- 
graphic Library of Cities Service Company, who 
will show and discuss this extensive facility: 
John Kettlewell of the Council on Candy: Sam- 
uel Austin of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange: 
Homer Huntington of the Poultry and Egg Na- 
li<inal Board: (ic.rge Keilinger. public relations 
dire<tor of Swift \ Company: Tom Hope of 
General Mills: and executives of the Illinois Bell 
Telephone Company; Electro-Motive Division, 
General Motors: and the Lumbermen's Mutual 
ln?urance Company. 

"New Horizons for Sponsored Films"' 
Frank Arlinghaus. president of Modern Talk- 
ing I'icture Service. Inc.. is the featured speak- 
er tm "New Horizons for Sponsored Films" at 
the luncheon meeting. 

The afternoon program will center on exter- 
nal or public relations material, including con- 
sumer edu<ation. institutional films, and com- 
inunitv relations whereas the morning sessions 
will mairdy center on internal, industrial rela- 
tions, st<H-kholder information, and employee in- 
formation programs utilizing all forms of audio- 
visual aids. The practical aspect will be stressed 
in every instance, with specific facts on costs and 
results to be given by participants from their 
extensive experiences with these media. 

The closing event of the day will bring execu- 
tives of all leading film producers into a panel 
dis<-ussion on "'Client-Producer Responsibilities." 
O. H. Coelln. BtsiNtss Sf.REEN, is moderator of 
the producer-client panel. 

Audio-Visual Flquipnienl on Kxliibition 
All Ivfies of modern aurlio-v i^ual projection 
e(|uipnienl will be displayed in a special exhibit 
area arranged for the Clinic by leading manu- 
facturers in the Chicago area. Guests will In- 
supplied with a special kit of literature. 

The Audio-Visual Clinic day, which originat- 
ed fcdlowiiig the similar but very limited panel 
held at the PRS.A annual convention in New 




York last Dec ember, is aimed to give the pub- 
lic ri-lalioiis and ad executives an overview of 
lliese potent tools for idea communication rang- 
ing from employee and public methods and ma- 
terials to television. An expected attendance of 
from 200 to .300 executives has been provided 
for by the sponsors. 



A New Heinz Company Picture 
Presents Story of "The Big Kitchen" 



Sponsor: IL J. Heinz Company. 
Title: The Bifi Kilclu-n. 26 min.. color. Pro- 
duced by Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

■k It is good to be reminded that America is a 
land of plenty and that the farmer who grows 
our food and the processor who prepares it for 
our table both represent solid, forward-looking 
Americanism. In The Rip Kitchen, which gets 
its name from the nationwide locations of the 
Heinz processing plants, the company brings the- 
story of our agricultural economy down to 
cases by elucidating the values of processed 
foods in nutrition and thrift. 

Two Years in Preparation 

Both sponsor and producer (Wilding Picture 
Productions. Inc.) made a thorough job of il. 
Preparation began two years ago, and lln' 
"Iravelogue"" covers Heinz factories and con- 
tributing farms from coast to coast. 

There's the vinegar-making area of Virginia, 
with the Apple Blossom Festival at Winchester 
and the Shenandoah Valley with its national 
shrines. The com|)anv has come a long way 
since it began making its first product, horse- 
radish, and the harvesting of the horseradish 
crop about Muscatine, Iowa, points up the fact. 
Tomato and baby food manufactures take the 
audience to New York. New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania and Ohio. At Bowling Green, center of 
Heinz rc-search on tomaloes and other plants for 
pickli-s. are acres li'.crally under glass. The 
camera moves on to California, the San Joaijuin 
Vallc-y and the Frontier Days celebration, and 
finally covers the Tulip Time observance at 
Holland. Mich., whic-h is also called the world's 
pickle capital. 

.\vailable Through National Sources 

Through the branches of the- Modi-rn Talking 
Picture Service. Inc.. The liif; kit<hi-ri will show 
to consumer groups including schocds, associa- 
tions, women's grou|>s. granges and service or- 
ganizatiims, as well as to grocers, hotel and 
restaurant staffs and others in the business of 
handling foods. 



Annual Meeting of 
lAVA March 19-21 

M CIIICA(;o"S KI)(;KViATER BEACH 

MKMMK.KS and guests of the Industrial 
Audio-Visual Asscjciation, national or- 
ganization of sponsors of business films 
and related audio-visual media, will hold the 
annual meeting of that group at (Chicago's Edge- 
walcT Beach lloli-i on March 19-20-21. In ad- 
dition to the national business meeting and 
annual election of officers, an extensive pro- 
gram of demonstrations, exhibits, film showings, 
and laboratory forums has been arranged for 
the three-day event. 

Special emphasis is being given the practical 
jiroblems faced by business film users in this 
national defense era. A majority of these clinic 
programs and discussion forums will be open 
to guests representing other companies now 
using or conteni|)lating film programs in busi- 
ness and industrv. Members of those firms ac- 
tually providing audio-visual services and equip- 
ment, advertising agencies, and trade associations 
are not eligible for membership. 

Companv film and TV representatives, not 
rnemhers of lAVA. but desiring further infor- 
mation on the Chicago meeting should corre- 
spcmd at once with Frank S. Rollins. E. R. 
Squibb & Sons. 745 Fifth Avenue. New York 
Citv. or with Donald Steinke. lAVA secretary, 
c/o Dow Chemical Company. Midland. Mich. 

Membership Review Forums Featured 

lAVA mendiers will discuss such pertinent 
subjects as the effects of defense production on 
company film programs: publicizing the busi- 
ness film: tie-in promotion and related media 
for c-ompan\ film programs: and new develop- 
ments in film production technique. 

An Audio-Visual Projection Clinic in which 
members will demonstrate many unusual types 
of projection equipment now in use by their 
c-ompanies is another feature of the meeting. A 
demonstratinn of the potentialities of Phone- 
vision is another program event. 

Internal Status of Film Divisions 

"Where Does the Film Division Belong in a 
Company" is another subject scheduled for panel 
discussion. In addition, one program will be 
devoted to a series of interviews and demon- 
strations conducted by a large Chicago busi- 
ness film studio. Wilding Picture Productions. 
Inc.. where members and guests will hear from 
a immber of experts on production, procure- 
ment, and other related problems. 

A thorough review of all Washington develop- 
ments relating to audio-visual media including 
the production programs of the Armed Forces, 
instructional film research at Penn State Col- 
lege, distribution and utilization developments 
in the bases and camps, will also be reviewed in 
special short-course programs arranged for mc-m- 
bers and guests of the association. 

Prominent jtersonalities in the business film 
field will address several luncheon meetings 
schedulc-d during the session. These arrange- < 
inents are under the direction of O. H. Coelln, 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



chairman in charge of progratn arrangements. 
Assisting in preparatiims for the Chicago meet- 
ing were lAVA |)rcsi(ifnt R. P. Hogan, W. M. 
I?astahli'. retired presidi-iil : Kraiik (Jrei-iilcaf. and 
John Huwliinsiin. treasurer. Don ."^teiiike, I (ow 
Chemical Company, is secretary of the national 
sponsor organization. * 



Bl'SIXKSS sriiK 



Modern Miracles of Die Casting Are 
Shown in New Doehler-Jarvis Picture 



Sponsor: Doehler-Jarvis Corporation. 

Title: The Shortest Jfay. 27 min., h&w, pro- 
duced l)V The Jam Handy Organization. 
* Although die casting is playing- an increas- 
ing role in the manufacture of almost every 
tvpe of hard goods, it is still in its infancy. 

"We ackniiwlcdge this." Mr. II. II. Doehler. 
Board Chairman <if DoehliT-Jarvis. said re- 
cently, "hut hi.story has taught us that in times 
gone hv there were such periods as the Stone 
Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age. and the age of 
today, .Steel. I shall not he greatly surprised 
to see the age upon which we are emharking 
now turn out to lie lahcled the Light Metal 
Age." 

Prepared to Exceed \\ ar Kecordr. 

During the conversion of industry to war 
materials production the die casting industry is 
prepared to far surpass its excellent record in 
World War II. During 1941-45, the Doehler- 
Jarvis Corp. produced some 9,300 components 
for the military machine. Its products can now 
he found in thousands of items of every day 
use in homes, motor cars, odices and factories. 

Graphic evidence of die casting's progress 
in industrial production is shown in a new mo- 
tion picture. The Shortest Way. It shows how- 
raw mail-rials are made into finished [iroducts 
in a matter of seconds. 

Begimiing at the liasis for the process, molten 
allo\s of aluminum, zinc, magnesium or lirass 
are shown heing forced under pressure into a 
steel die. This sometimes completes the prod- 
uct at one step, or the castings may he finished 
1>\ (rimming, plating or bulling. 

Wide Range of Products .\re Shown 

Knd produits are shown, from such things as 
proji-clors. slide viewers, cameras and editing 
marliifies to Washing machines, gas pumps, elec- 
Irir trains. t\pcwriii-rs ami kilrhen appliaii<-i's. 
Proudest acc-omplishmenis rif Doehler-Jarvis arc 
»liiiwn as the one piece casting of an automo- 
bile door and the group of close tolerance cast- 
ings whiih are essential housings of Hydra- 
malic. BorgW arner. D\nall<iw aiul I Itramalif- 
aulonialic transmissions. 

The ShiiTlrst Way was made for tin- use of 
t'-clmical societies, users and prosiM'ctive users 
of die castings, product engineers, technical .Mu- 
denls and other grou|)s interj-sted in modern 
manufacturing processiY*. 

It may be procun-d from sales or plant man- 
agers al Doi-hler-Jarvis plants in Ti>lrdii. Ohio; 
Pollslown. Pa.; Balavia, N. Y.; Chicago, III. 
and Grand Rapids, Mich., or from Doehler- 
Jarvis Departtnenl of Public Relations, ^iVt 
Kourlh Avenue, New York Citv. 




era 



FI.ATIKHTV FKSTINAI. MoNOKS 
"lATllLK UI- TIIK IK)LI .MK.M AKV 

■k Members of the Screen Directors Guild made 
history on two counts last month when they 
staged the Flaherty Film Festival in honor of 
"The Father of the Documentary" pioneer film 
maker Robert Flaherty at New York's Museum 
of Modern Art. It was the first one-man cinema 
show ever staged in America: it was also the 
first lime all of Haherly's great films have been 
gathered together for one three-part showing. 
The Festival was held to packed houses on Jan- 
uary 9. 10, and 11. 

Mr. Flaherty appeared eaih night to discuss 
his films with the audience and on the (-losing 
night he was pres<>nted with a special award 
and a paid-up life membership card from his 
fellow members of the Screen Directors Guild. 
The (italion read in part "his example serves as 
a liea«-on light ... to elevate the art and craft of 
our profession." Moderators of the Festival were 
(iilbert Seldes. author and critii-. and Dr. Charles 
A. Siepmann. N. Y. University F'ilm Library. 





IN THK 1'U:TI RES 

ABOVi-:: Famvil film niiikrr Rith- 
erf h'lnhiTty (ci-nli-rl rvrrivrit 
Crrlifiiatr «»/ //on or o/ thf 
Si rirn Hiri-ititm (itiilil frimi 
SlKi firrsidfiit Jack Ctlrtin <il 
ri'rvnl hlnhrrtv Film tfulital: 
In lltv left is I'liltl Falkmln'tfi. 
SIXi Forums rhnirman. I.KI-T: 
I ftimims still filn>lofirai>her, 
Miirpiin-t Htmrkf-lf liili; fgrt'i-ls 
till- jiilUrr ri/ till- iliHiimrnlnry 
film lit till- rrri-nl FInhrrty Film 
hi\tiiiil iilii'ri- sill- joini'il iiith 
iitliir iii'll-kiiDit II pi'rsonnlitirs 
ill imyiii^ /loniage /(» ihr xvlrrnn 
riiirmalisl. 



CIIHISTOPIIIK I II.M IN DP:MAM) I)RI\ KR KDK.ATION 1 II M I'HIM k 



"^(it <:\N (11 tN(,K iliK woiil.K." fiimril mii- 
lion fiiiturr ri'iiditioii of Fiitlirr Jiimrs KrI- 
Irr's iiis/tiralionnl mrssngi- to .tmrricans 
( iiotv rnst hrloii I. is in its srionil tliousiinil 
firints sold ami in iisi- l>y iiiitlii-iiii-s lliroiif:li- 
out thv country. 



(.KNKR»I. MOTOR-* tiriirr rdiiiiitiini film urifs 
litis itmiviivil in l.os tn/iilrs iindrr tlir nus- 
l>irrs of Hon M. Iloiisi: prrsiilriit of linnl (iM 
('.lull. Slioiin hrloii- (I to ri Miirsliiill ('.ran- 
s/i<ii(, /, ( sriiool.s: Mr. //on.»c; Itrnry (lark 
mid linn (nihil ol <,M i i>m/m/ii«'<: nml /'r. 
7". ir . Forl,i>. I ( I t hi-litiil,- of Triiffii . 





N I M n K R 1 



VO 1 I M K 1 : • 1 OS I 



23 




f^\^.r 




PHOTO LIBRARY: PubOc Relations Asset 



QUALITY AISD SCOPE OF MATERIALS EARN l)l\ IDENDS 
FOH I HIS SYSTEM-WIDE CITIES SERVICE PROJECT 



t "Pirlurt' lili-iis for fiiisiiu-ss" 
I'fiiliin' on FiiiK lioinil i*hol<)iinii>h\ 

l,i-fl: "Storage Spheres" by C. K. Hotkiii 
A Cities Service Company I'itture 

liit of pioneering. The projci t i> iinflcr the 
clirfctioii of Merle Thorpe ami I'aul lloilges. 
Diri-ilor anil Assistant Direiior of the Business 
Di-vclopnient Department of (iities Service. 

I his lihrarN now consists of some lli.CKKt 
black and white negatives, and 3.(KK) color 
transparencies, gathered by photographers of 
national repute who. to gel them, have traveled 
more than .i.S.OfM) miles from the Hoikies to 
the Kast Coast ami from Northern Canada to 
Central Mexico. 

As photografihs began to Ibnv into the ollice 
from the field, two problems were immediately 
apparent in this new operation. 

(toIiI Mine for Hou>e Publications 

It was obviouslv imjiossiblc for the photog- 
raphers to do an adequate job of identifying 
and captioning the material. .Set the Company 
adopted the policy of sending along an editorial 
man with each photographer. The results have 
been amazingly gratif\ing as to the accuracy of 
all the descriptive material. In a<idition. there 
devel<i|)ed a gold mine of editorial material for 
eight compam and employee publications [house 
organs], for publicitv releases, promotional bro- 
chures and other literature, and for scripts for 
sound slidefilms and motion pictures. 

The second |)rincipal problem had to do with 
making the photcjs available for a wide range 
of uses, and for Cities Service ofTices through- 
out the country. It was obvious from the start 
that drawers full of prints would be so many 
dead ducks unless a system were devised where- 
bv individual [jrints could be selected and made 
available (|ui('klv. 

Pictorial Quality First Objective 

One thing the Companv resolved to avoid at 
all costs was the assembling of just another 
batch of nuts and bolts photographs. Much in- 
dustrial photographv is pretty bad. usually taken 
according to engineering specifications without 
much regard to artistic excellence or ({ualitv. 

CITIES SERVICE IMIOKI I.IKKVK^ ill Miinhiitlan, 
sliouiiifi rxhiltil in visitor's /tnllvrv. 



AYP'.AR AM) A iiAl.K AGO the Cities .Service 
('ompanv iH-gan an earnest campaign to 
familiarize some 25.(KH( employees, located 
ill forty slates and in Canada, with the far flung 
activities and grealK expanded facilities of the 
Cities S<Tvice svstem. The Company's problem 
was somewhat unusual. In the cdd days, Cities 
"ervice had been engaged in many diverse types 
of busines.<ies and operations, and was associated 
in the minds of the general public, as well as 
many of its own people, principally with elec- 
tric utilities, (^.ilies Service had gotten out of 
the eleitrii utility business during the forties, 
and since then has concentrated almost exclu- 
-ively upon oil and natural gas. Its operations 
in oil and natural gas had always been exien- 



IX 



sive, hut were scattered over a wide range and 
split up among many subsidiary companies 
which wi-re. and still are. largely autonomous. 
There was very little understanding even with- 
in some segments of its own family about the 
true character and extent of the overall busi- 
ness. 

Many devices were brought into play to cor- 
rect this situation. One of ihi-se and a most 
important one — was the building of a system- 
w i<le )>hotographic project. Within the last 18 
months Cities Service has created in its head- 
i|uarlers building. Sixtv Wall I'lpwer. in Man- 
hattan, a photographic library and display rootn 
which is attracting a good deal of attention and 
in the building of which it has done quite a 




Cities Service deleriiiiiiiMi ti> Imild a good solid 
core of qualitN. al the expense of (|uaMlity. and 
il has never had aii\ reason lo regret that de- 
cision. 

The next step was to set u|) in the liea<h|uar- 
lers huiidiiig at Sixl\ Uall Tower a display 
room to exhihit the .■idar-.'ed Idack and while 
and eoior prints. Hundreds of miployees in the 
New York area have visited this room, the sales 
force hrings customers into it regularly, and a 
Directors meeting was held there last month, in 
the midst of \ isual e\ iilence which showed where 
the Compan\"s investments have i)een and are be- 
ing made for new facilities and expanded opera- 
tions. 

P'acilitieg Help Improve Service 

It has been arranged, hy means of sliding 
curtains, lo use one end of the display room as 
a projeclion room with ei|uipment a\ailalile for 
the showing of motion pictures, slides anil sounii 
slidefdiiis. .Niclxdas I'arrino. formerly Photo- 
graphic Kditor of Nkwswkkk Magazine, who is 
superintendent of the Photo Library, designed 
and had built a special projection bar with am- 
ple space for projeclion e(|uipment storage facili- 
ties, and with a large light box upon which a 
whole strip film in sequence can be laid out. This 
is a tremendous help in planning sound slide- 
films. 

While all of this sounds simple, the tough job 
- the kev lo the success of the enterprise — is 
the svsteni devised bv Nicholas I'arrino for iden- 
lif\ing. cataloging, tiling and making available 
both prints and negatives. No attempt is made 
to keep on hand a large number of prints. All 
black and white negatives are filed with a pro- 
fessional laboratorv. This firm is prepared to 
deliver, within two or three hours notice, prints 
made up fresh from the original negative. 

Aliuim.s I'sed for Print Selection 

Of the total l.'i.lXK) or U.tMV) black and white 
negatives, about .S.5<X) have been .selected whii'h 
are reproduced in the form of contact prints, 
pasted up in reference volumes. 

Kacli (iinlact |>rint bears a number and im 
the left hand page ap|)ears the same nund>er 
with a fairly complete caption for each of the 
prints. The contact books are kept more or less 
chronologicallv with divisions for exploration, 
production, refining, transportation and market- 




I'Ro.iKcrniN \l!K\ III llir C.ilii-s .Scri/cc l'liolograi>hir Library inrliidfi 
n light tahir irlirri- rnlitr sithjiTls inii\ hi' itudied and ansfrtihlfd. 



itig. Selections of lop (|ualit\ prints in '> inch 
b> II inch size are put up in l<Mllicr bound di«- 
|>la\ books. 

Thus, anyone who wishes to see what is avail- 
able can do so very quicklv and easilv. hv mere- 
ly running through these books. He then orders 
by number on special order blanks: the order 
is telephoned to the laboratorv. and within Iwo 
or three hours I except where mass production is 
concerned I new |)rints are delivered to the desk 
downtown, or tlirectly to the customer. 

Color Duplicated in HIack X W liit<- 
Ml (iilor Iranspari-ncies an- kepi on hie in 
the Photo Library al Sixty Wall Tower. On the 
frame of each slide is stamped a number. These 
numbers then correspond to blaik and white 
contact prints which are made up from the color 
transparencies. This enabh-- ihe Photographic 



Department to refer readilv lo all of the color 
work available ami provide iiiuuediate caption- 
ing. .So far as can be discovered, this is a new 
l)r<icedure and it has proved very successful. In 
order to make selectiims of color from ccdor. it 
is necessarv to go laboriouslv ihroiigh a file over 
a light box. 

Division OfTii-es \l>o <iivc S«Tvice 

\\ hen the |M-rson making the sehttion decide* 
that the file contains something he wants, il is 
shtiwn first in black anil white: the transparen- 
cies are next placed over the light box and then 
projected if the visitor wants them i-idarged. 

It is important to note that the photographs 
from the files are available not only from .Sixty 
\^'all Tower, but at various division oflices 
throughout the (jti*-* Serxice system. This is 
icontimkh on tmk koi.i.ow i n«. i'*(;ki 



► oi K I1\«<h; DISI'1,V\ m)i)K> Itimsr a sflriliiiii 
!>/ hisl i>iiliirr.t mnilnhli' in '> x II firiiilt. 



( (II iiH I It VN^l'Mil- N< IKS iirf lii-jil in .'i/»'ri(i//v 
ilrsifiniil ilriiiirrs in tlir I'linin l.ihrnry. 



I'Wl COLOR sl.lDK-s art- disfdnyd in ihin intfim- 

sifr light liiix iirrnngtniint. 





Radio -TV Makers Hold Town Meetings 

DKALKK SCHOOLS AHK I'OI'I l.\l{ DKSI'ITK SEESAW .MARKET CONDITIONS 



KM) ISK: piititrinl honk jiri'parfd from ma- 
tprial in the I'liiito Library for rrcrnt dedicn- 
tion of llif rirtf Compound and Blending 
Plant at Cliieapo. 



Piftiire Public Relations 

(CONTINLED FROM THE PRECEDING PAGE I 

possible biiause adequate sets of hoih conlael 
and display books are made available to various 
offices. This availability has proved invaluable, 
specially in he production of promotional lit- 
erature by their various subsidiary companies. 

Here Are Some Recent Results 

To date, about a year and a half af'.er the 
project was started. Cities Service has supplied. 
without charge, some 25,000 photographic prints 
to member companies and to various publica- 
tions. More than several thousand were supplied 
to newspapers, nearly 2.000 to oil and gas trade 
publications, about 700 to picture syndicates 
and feature services, and about .500 to display 
exhibit builders, 200 to United States Govern- 
ment agencies. More than 1.000 more went out 
to general magazines and about .'100 to educa- 
tional institutions, and about 700 to advertising 
agencies. In ever) case, these photographs were 
supplied at the request of these publications or 
agencies. 

A very careful record is kept, so far as is 
feasible, of the uses to which the photographs 
are put. Kver\ time a new photograph is made, 
a card is made up for it and put in the hies. 
Thereafter, all usc-s <if that photograph are re- 
corded on the lard. 

Kicli Fielil for Itidu'-trial Pliolograpliy 

All in all the Photographic Library has pro- 
vided Cities SerNice with an oulstaruling public 
relations medium. On the basis of its short but 
intensive experience, the Company is convinced 
that there is a vast field for the use of good in- 
dustrial photography in ofTcring a better under- 
standing of the American Free Enterprise sys- 
tem. Incidentally all the pictures for this article 
are from the Cities Service Photo Library. • 



26 



* \ naliipiiw ide cooperative project to educate 
eviTV radio and television dealer in solid busi- 
ness practice and merchandising, with four sound 
-lidefihns as the focus of attention, has armed 
the retailers «itb the latest selling and operating 
weapons for the period ahead. 

Because of unforseeable international de- 
velopmenis after the program went into opera- 
tion, instead of the sixty Town Meetings origi- 
nalU planned it was ex|)ected that the fiftieth 
meeting, thai in Cleveland Ki^liruary iVtli. with 
sixteen local distril>utors participating, would 
be the last. 

The uniform success of the project is reflected 
l'\ a roundup of reports to the campaign's com- 
mittee on average audiences in 31 cities and 
the average nundier of dealers and dealers" 
salesmen who attended in 2B cities. The figures 
point to an overall audience of 10,000 in 50 
cities, 6,700 of them dealers and their salesmen. 
Ninety-four |)er cent of committee chairmen 
wrote that distributors were hapi)\ over the re- 
sults, and 07 |)er cent of the chairmen said ihey 
planned further use of the films and records. 

Manufacturers Saw Sales Resistance 

The decision of seventeen large makers of 
television sets to launch the educational program, 
with the joint sponsorship of the Radio-Tele- 
vision Manufacturers Association, was prompt- 
ed by a long-distance view of the selling job 
ahead when practically every American home 
will have a set. Then competition will sharpen 
to an even keener edge than it has today. 

Coupled with the future's call to action now 
were some statistics. More than half of the radio- 
television dealers in the land have been in opera- 
tion three years or less, the survey showed, and 
67.5 per cent of businesses that fail have been 
started within five years. All this in a boom 
market. 

Analysis showed many amateurs among the 
dealers, with G.I. loans as starters, their own 
credit too thin, customer credit too tliii k. i;uar- 
antees of service unfulfilled. 

The manufacturers' association, having de- 
termined to do something about it. but on a 



cooperative and non-competitive basis, adoptei 
the recommendation of a study group that tht 
program follow the basic lines of the Towi 
Meetings of Radio Technicians which the a--ii 
ciation had sponsored in 10-18 and 10l'». ,,i 
servicing television. 

The eagerness with which most service shoj 
proprietors greeted that program encouriigec 
the adoption of the all-out campaign to helg 
dealers. 

Size of Meetings AfTects Results 

Vi hetlier to have a series of small meetings it 
a city or one large gathering depends upon th< 
objective of the planners of similar projects. In 
the radio - television program. ."^ n Fran:isr. 
found a series of small group meetings succe>- 
ful. In Philadelphia, where 700 dealers gathered 
and more than 200 additional applications coubl 
not be accoirmiodated, an all-day meeting wu- 
held, with a panel discussion following the sh<n\ 
ing of each film. In Los Angeles the attendaiw ■ 
exceeded 1.200. Cleveland decided upon the San 
Francisco pattern. The national committee em 
|)hasized the large single meeting as an interest- 
stimulator, while conceding that a series of small 
group sessions was more effective for educatioiuil 
purposes. 

Timing is all-important, when the future i- 
predictable. When shooting began on the radio- 
television films, a buyers' market at year-einl 
because of over-production was in prospect. Tin n 
came the Korean invasion and "panic-buying. 
Dealers were more concerned over getting mcr 
(handise than learning sales techniques. Tlii- 
iiiultiplicd the problem of building interest in 
the Town meetings. Came Regulation \^ and the 
controversy over color, and the importance of 
the original purpose returned to the fore in tli'- 
minds of some leaders. When sales began .i 
sharp decline in November, the program wa- 
alreadv near completion, and impending limil.i 
tion of set production brought the deiision ii"l 
to press for meetings not already arranged. 

Among conclusions reached that are applicabl' 
to campaigns of a similar nature are the^ 
Budgets should provide for follow-ups. to m .- 



Tlu 



'(//■(» anti 11 dealers attended the "Toun Meeting" at Boston last fall. 




FILMS IN DEALER RELATIONS 



"Jiat the original hiral plan- art- rarrifd uul: 
•onsiderabif allrntlun -luuild In- given Id tlu' 
■'live" part of the infclings as well as Imilcling 
budience; arrarigi-tucnis should insure •mud ani- 
Iplifying and lighting and proper handling of ihe 
Ifilms: nia'erial sIkiuKI l)e gauged to the average 
nudienec level. 

I Replies to the general i iminiitli-e's (juestion- 
kiaires showed the following |)referenie rating 
of film suhjeets. provided sullirient sets can be 
supplied to meet puhlie demand: ll) sales, (21 
service, l3l merchandising, 1 4) business man- 

■ riient. If a war economy reduces supplv 1"'- 

> demand, subject preference reported is in 
Ithis order: service, management, sales, nierchan- 
idising. ^ 

The decision to build the dealers' Town Meet- 
ings on screen messages was a logical adapta- 
tion of tbe fact established by experience that 
the slide tiltn drives home its points with a one- 
two putK'h. 

There were plenty of precedents for the mer- 

( CO NT! M EI) 0.\ PACK FORTY- EIGHT I 




■1 xrfnr jroin ") on'ri- tliv Ihtititr 

FMD: "Doctor of Farm Machinery" 

Presented in Ethyl Corporation Picture 

S|K>nsor: Ethyl Corporation. 

Title: You're the Doctor. Produced by .Audio 
Productions, Inc. 

♦ Skilled mechanics in the service departments 
of farm e<|uipmenl retailers account for a good 
amount of the "healthv horsepower" whiih is 
so abundant in this country. 

How they do their jobs — specifically, a valve 

' job on a tractor engine is the subject of this 

I film. Rut of equal importance, as the pictun- 

brings out, is the position of responsibilitv 

which these men hold in the slorv and progress 

of American Agriculture. 

In company with the countrv iloclors in rural 
communities who help to keep our farmer-citi- 
Mns supplving "healthv mntip<iwer" to their 
I daily tasks, these men have also dedicated 
themselves to s<'rvire in the e\p<-rl maintenafHe 
of full performance for farm machinery and 
I equipment. 

j While this motion picture comprises to a 
I considerable degree a training film for tractor 
Healers to show to their emplovee-mechanics, it 
is as well a tribute to their work and skill. 



NUMBER 1 • vol. I'M F. i; • 1 ■» 3 1 



Dealer Benelils in Nalional Advertising 

A GOOD NKW TEXACO FILM DKM.S WITH .SIBJECT IN III M\N lEHMS 



Sponsor: The Texas Company. 
Title: An Introduction to Meailiille. Produced 
b\ Audio Productions, Inc. 

♦ A new and provocative motion picture treat- 
ment of a controversial subji-ct that has been 
argued back and forth for years has just been 
released and is causing quite a stir in advertis- 
ing circles. 

Most manufacturers of consumer products 
having nation-wide distribution through loial 
dealers are faced at one time or another with 
the problem of demonstrating the cflectiveness 
of network radio and television, national maga- 
zines and outdoor advertising to their dealers 
and retail outlets. This picture was written and 
produced for The Texas Companv bv Audio 
Productions, Inc. to prove to the Texaco Dealer 
the importance of Texas Company nalional ad- 
vertising in his day-to-day success and the re- 
sults at the local level of twenty-five years of 
national advertising. 

Shows Applications of National Ads 

While the picture was designed onlv with 
the thought of dealer meetings in mind, it has 
already indicated its usefulness as a public re- 
lations and jlealer recruiting medium. It also 
qualifies as a training film in that it demon- 
strates to the dealer the means and methods of 
merchandising nalional advertising with the 
customer. 

The Advertising and Sales Promotion depart- 
ments of The Texas Companv. Erwin-W'asev. 
(iunningham and Walsh, and .Arthur Kudner 
advertising ageni-ies, the Magazine Advertising 
Bureau, the Outdoor Advertising Association 
and the National Association of Broadcasters 
all worked closely with .Audio's writing and 
production staff in preparing information in 
support of the story. The film was made under 
the personal direction of Mr. Don .Stewart. Ad- 
vertising Manager, and Mr. Jasper M. Cregorv, 
Sales Promotion .Manager of The Texas Com- 
pany. The production was supervised by Mr. 
Bavmotid Apy, Assistant Sales Promotion Man- 



MK\1»MI.i.k"> mn(.in(. (.1.1 II rviulfra the Tr.xnco 
I'llni'i tlii-mr muiii "For V«nr \nnir M Jiulmii 
Hroirit" in friitiillv icrirlinp. 



SHOP 




ager, and Mr. James V. Coogan, Assistant .Ad- 
vertising Manager of The Texas Company. 

The film has an original music .score in which 
part of the story is told in song by a male quar- 
tet, the main part of the story being carried 
both by live sound and off-screen narration. 

Cast of Professiomis Featured 
The cast of eighteen people includes YA Elast, 
one of the original "Sisters of the Skillet," and 
famous for many other radio and screen char- 
acterizations. The lead is played by William 
.Adler, a star of the Barter Theater and such 
television programs as Studio One, Sus(>enae 
and Famous Jury Trials. In supporting parts 
are Viola Frayne, well known Broadway star 
who played the role of V'innie opposite Louis 
(lalhern in "Life With Father," and Jackie 
Schidle, now ])laying in the Broadway produc- 
tion of "Peter Pan" with Jean Arthur. Both 
Milton Berle and Sid Stone appear in the film, 
and on the sound track the voice* of Milton 
Cross and Ted Husing are familiar to the audi- 
ence. 

fold in lerni? of Everyday Living 

From a technical standpoint the film leaves 
little to be desired, but ()erhap8 even more 
notable is the manner in which a somewhat 
abstract subject is brought to life with warmth 
and intimacy in terms of human experience. The 
experience is that of a young man who. with 
his family, moves into a new and strange com- 
munity where he, as owner, is to o|)erale a new 
Texaco service station. A comple'e stranger, 
he embarks on a new life with all the fears 
and misgivings with which such an experience 
is fraught. Poinding the job of building a busi- 
ness in a strange communitv not S4i diflicult 
as he expected, he dis<-overs that he is reallv not 
a stranger, that twenty-five vears of nalional 
advertising by his company has already intro- 
duced him, made a place for him and created 
the firm foundation on which his success will 
lie buill in his home town. • 



Tlll^ HK«>» N 1^ \Min inkvs n first liwk at Mcim/- 
tillf uhrri- Jmlsoii Uroun in to makr hin fit- 

tiiri ltii\irit ^^ ( iirtf r . 




27 



Mci'(-liaii(lisiii|| le(-lini(|iies Via (he Screen 

M W I'KII UKS IIKI.I- IMI'KOM; DIM.I'KS SAl.KS l'H( »M()II(>N 



TIIK Sl'KKMl Ixlucrn ruw iir.ului I dcvel- 
ii|>iiirnt> and our national s\strrn of mass 
liistriliiitioii lias liccn suici'ssfull) ilosril 
innunu*ral>li' times In ix-tlcr i-oiiimiiiiirations \ ia 
.louiul motion pictures and slidetilms designed to 
transmit company plans and policies from head- 
quarters to the farthest reaches of the dislrilni- 
tion line. 

In this nioiilhs news of pictures, two fields 
which liaxe inaile increasing and effective use of 
the visual meiliuiii are once again among spon- 
sors of merchandising films. The furniture in- 
dustry has a national dealer training program 
and the liquor husine.ss has been a frequent and 
successful sponsor of sound films. Both are 
represented in new pictures now in the field. 

"Enduring Modem" Shows Furniture 
Field Lasting Value of Modem Design 

Sponsor: Valle\ I pholslerv (.orp. 
Title: Entluririj: Modern. 15 niin.. color, pro- 
duced by Campus Film Productions. 

"k Point of this film is that modern furniture 
IS as lasting in stvle and correct in fundamental 
design as the best examples of well established 
period furniture. For proof. Valley jjiefes. 
many designed 20 years ago. are shown as be- 
ing in as great demand today as they were 
when introduced. 

Valley Upholstery Corp. is a leader and pio- 
neer in the modern furniture field, has outlets 
in one or two exclusive stores in most cities 
east of the Mississippi. The new film Emluriiig 
Modern, has been used during the past fall and 
winter principally to introduce the new an- 
nual line to the trade. In addition, Modern 
Talking Picture Service is now distributing 
prints to audiences outside the furniture indus- 
try. 

Valley salesmen have been supplied with a 
complete kit of color slides (also produced by 
Campus Film Productions) in addition to the 
movie. \X'1iile the motion picture introduces 
the whole line, for actual sales presentations the 
slides are used to j>ermit longer inspection and 
discussion of each piece. 

Following a live sound introduction of two 
little girls planning their home of the future, 
the film shows striking examples of how the new- 
line enhances various room .settings, with actual 

PfUVTKRs ON (.ODD DEsiCN aro f(ivpn in llir iivn 
I filli-y film "Knilurinfi Modi-rn." 




photographic scenes and color drawings. Famed 
designers Norman Fox McGregor and Peter 
Schladermundl are seen conferring mi (ilans for 
till' new line. 

The initial success of the liim bus been re- 
flected, not only by actual sales success in the 
field, but by the fact that Goodyear Tire & Rub- 
ber Company, makers of airfoam cushions, and 
a Valley supplier, has joined in promotion of 
the film. 

National Distillers Tells Dealers How 
to Handle Complex Sales Problems 

."Sponsor: National Distillers Corp. 

Title: Doinfi liiisiness on llw Tiki l.tihrl I'ltin. 
28 iiiin.. color, produced In liljiis I'nr In- 
dustry. Inc. 

"k Before the war about 00' , of the wliiskv sold 
in this country was straight. Owing to short- 
ages of supply during and just after the war. 
many well known straights were converted, un- 
der the same brand name, to quality blends. The 
current market shows that because of price rea- 
sons, and because of a shift in popular tastes, 
55'; to 65' r of whisky sales are in blends. 

Although there has been some indication that 
with stocks of aged straight whisky improving 
each year, many distillers will go all out in pro- 
motion of straights at the expense of blends, 
some (such as Paul Jones) are reluctant to aban- 
don heavy promotion of the current favorable 
blend market. 

One distiller who has figured a way to accom- 
plish added emphasis on straights without sac- 
rificing blends is National Distillers Corp. For 
years, the company has marketed whiskies 
known as contract label brands under several 
different and locally popular names I Hill & Hill. 
Sunnybrook. etc.). Formerly straight Kentmky 
whiskies. National Distillers contract labels were 
converted to Kentucky based blends during the 
war. Now, to keep the excellent market the 
blends have established under their respective 
names, and regain old customer preference for 
the brands as straights. National Distillers is 
prodiKJiig both ty|)es of whisky under one name, 
liul with two labels, yellow and white. 

To tell this story to wholesalers and their 
salesmen. National Distillers is relying on a new- 
film featuring vice-presidents Sidney Hamilton 
and Kri(- Staiiiton. Roth executives, who. inci- 
dentally do <]uite a g<iod acting job for Veepees 

take part in a little drama about the doubt- 
ful wholesaler, the good salesman "SellweH" 
and the poor salesman "Hotshot." 

The picture, which is necessarily "talkv," is 
interesting for its effective haiulling of a loni- 
plex and delicate merchandising problem. 

Story of the First Phone Exchange 

-A- l'licitogra|)lied and souiid-re(-orde<l b\ sMi- 
1 lironoiis magnetic- tape on the new sound stage 

of Rdi.Mi Sri s in Sandy Hook. Conn., a 45- 

iiiinute film. '/V/ep/ionc I'iuneers, dramatizes the 
first commeri'ial phone exchange at New Ha- 
ven, in 1878. The picture was made for the 
Southern New Kngland Telephoni- Company. 




BF.\ llAROKST-*. \(ilioii(il Hail and h'ly- 
('.fi.stinp ('J\iimpii>ii /i/iix-ars in "Fishin' 
for Fun," si)unsorcd by Fisher Body. 



The Sports Screen 

GROWING LIST OK (;00I) PICTl RES 
PLAYING TO NATIONWIDE Al UIENCE 



POPULAR among males throughout the lain! 
are the numerous sponsored films on sports 
subjects circulating to all kinds of audience 
groups. These include the two Nash subje<-ls 
Hunlinf! in Alaska and Fishing in Alaska; Oliii 
Industries" Pheasants Galore, Whistling Winjis. 
and Realm of the Wild: and Canada Dry's Mak- 
ing of a Yankee, all distributed by Modern Talk- 
ing Picture Service to record-breaking audiences. 
Here are some new additions to the sports film 
library now available for showings: 

This is Really "Fishin' For Fun" 

Sponsor: Fisher Body Division. General Motors 

Corp. 
Title: FUhin' For Fun. 20 niin.. color, pro- 
duced by Sound Masters. Inc, 
"k To think a producer gets paid for making 
a picture like this! Actually, no film this much 
fun could be made for just money. Sound 
Masters* location crew- could never have had 
it so good. It's a happy movie all the wav 
through. 

If you're a fisherman, or even if you're not 
one, this is the picture you've got to see, for 
never before has there been one like it. These 
fish are as cooperative for the cameraman (and 
tricky to the angler) as if they held Equity 
cards and were leaping on union scale. 

Although National FIv Casting champ Ben 
Hardesty is the featured player, brown, rain- 
how and brook (rout, small and large mouth 
bass, sailfish, boncfish and tarpon are the real 
stars in the picture. 

Fishin' For Fun runs the whole gamut of 
piscatorial thrills. Hardesty nets a beautiful 
Rainbow in Northern Michigan, bass in .New 
Jersey, several sails off Miami, bonefish in the 
Florida bays and finally, as the topper, tarpon 
on a fly rod up the .^hark River in West Florid*. 
At this point narrator Ted Husing sounds, as 



28 



BUSINESS SCREEN MA(;AZINE 



Fred Allen has said, "like a fellow locked in 
the men's ronni," hut his exi-itcinent is jusli- 
I fied: this fraiitir tarpon is a born ham and 
photogenic as well. 

Color is exceptionally soft on this film, giving 

I a much more realistic and attractive [licturc 

I than average Kodachrome, or Commercial Ko- 

dachrome (which this is), especially on water. 

Fisher Body has modesth limited its credits 

to one mention in the title. The picture will 

join till- division's ow ti film lilirary. 

• • • 

Safety Lessons for Young Shooters 

.*^ponsor: The Sporting Arms and Annnunition 
Manufacturers Institute. 

Title: Shoolini: Sajely. 23 miii.. color, produced 
hv Sound Masters. Inc. 

•k When should an enthusiastic young sports- 
man he allowed to possess and use his own 
gun? According to a new film. Shooting; Safely. 
not before he has learned to use it safely under 
all conditions. 

How youngsters can be taught to use a gun 
safely is the story of Shoolinp Safely. One fa- 
ther, deliberating his sons re<]uest for a gun. 
sets in motion a plan for teaching many other 
young people of the town. Not only parents 
but the local gun di'aler. policemen and teachers 
all cooperate in setting up a class in safe gun 
handling and marksmanship. 

• » • 

A Who's Who of Bowlers in Action 

Sponsor: The National Bowling Council. 

Title: America Routs. 2.'?io min. Produced b\ 
the Atlas Film Corporation. 

♦ Institutional as well as semi-technical in 
treatment, America Bowb is basically a promo- 
tion motion picture for the proprietors of bowl- 
ing establishtnents. The consumi-r approach is 
both in till' demonstration of the S[>ort's wide- 
spread app<'al and in the |MTformers — top- 
notchers of the pins. 

The 16rnin production, which was shot by the 
Ati..\s Film Cori-okation at Chicago's Gateway 
Lanes, presents the steps neces.sarv for the novice 
to become a good bowler and then sh<iws ex- 
perts demonstrating their own techniques in 
holds and deliveries. 

Distribution is by the Council through the 
Atlas Film Corporation, 1111 South Blvd.. Oak 
Park. Illinois' business film studios. 



NFJJ DAY BOWLJi as the t-amrrit crew fitruuvs 
Hull II till- liiiii-s fur till- film " tmrririi Itoiils." 




Thr scent of fiami- anil 
ihr Inrr itf llir iifwn 
firlil arr jninril in litis 
sliitly of tnildiHtr lift- 
from llir ni-ic Itimni 
film "Tar llrrl Mild 
Liff" s fx) n sor ril l> \ 
Ni»r//i (.itri>limi. 





"TVK IIKKI, Willi I.ikk" hrinfis llir lamrra into 
fonts nitli litis drnizrn of thv iiuods. 



Wild Life Is An Important Resource 

.*>poiisor: Wild l.ifi- Kesources Coniniis.sion. 
Stall- of North Carolina. 

I'itle: Tar Heel If iltl Life, 2.5 min.. color, pro- 
duced by MI'O Productions. 

'k W ild lifi- resources are more than a pic- 
turesi|ue as,s<'t to the jH-ople of a state. They 
represent the basis of a going industry today 
anil a huge inxestment in the future. 

This i> the message of a new film re«-pnll\ 
releasi-d l>\ the North Carolina Wild Life He- 
sources (!ommission which will be si-en by a* 
manv of the slate's four million people as can 
possibK be arranged. Kverv school child will 
see the picture, and theatres, clubs, and every 
other adult group will be urged to sirii'n it. 

Tar Hrrl U tlil Life is a thorough pictorial 
round up of the consi'rvntion situation in North 
(iarolina today. It shows what steps are l>ring 
taken to preserve natural wild life resources anil 
foster greater rps«-rvi's of living things. It 
covers forestry, animal, bird and fish life and 
soil eroxion. shows what tvpiial Carolinian- 
think of ilii-ir •■tnte'« uijil life assets. 



"Ain t no place to hide down here," one man 
says, echoing the words of an old spiritual. With 
no large cities, .North Carolina is one of the 
most populous states \h-t square mile in the 
countr). The film shows how extensive farm 
development and lumbering iqierations have 
been reducing the places where wild life can 
live for many years. Former clear streams have 
liecn polluted, ilriving out fish. 

On the credit >ide. however, the film makes 
it clear that Tar llecis are reiognizing the de- 
pletion of wild life and taking rapid steps to 
provide natural refuges for wild life preservation. 

Live sound sequences made hv portable tape 
cquifiment mounted in a jeep are but one ex- 
ample of how this film shows a professional 
approach to its problem rarely seen in stale 
government sponsored motion pictures. 

For years to come, sport loving visitors and 
Carolinians, themselvi-s. should find, as a result 
of this consi-rvation campaign, the Old North 
Slate to lie a better place to live, or to s[i«-iul a 
holiday amidst the fields and streams. # 

i.AMK CONSKKV iiiiiN /» ilii- til, -mi' of this \orth 
C«rii/i»i(i->/ioii><>r. ./ I ii/..r iiinlion pii tun . 




N r M B K R I 



\ Ol I M K 12 • I'ISI 



29 



Human Relations and the Screen: 



Four New Films: Each Willi a Mission 

NOI.I MVKV !• \IU KMI'I.OYMFNT: PFnioniC UKMTII KX VMFWTIONS 

/loMsr n ND-misiNt; and tk.mi'Kka.nck akk iiik.mks ok films 



THE EMOTIONAL IMPACT of the screen 
is a powfrful all> nf good causes. Ite value 
ill liuinuii relations is (ii-inonslrali'd l>y 
inaiiv rurreiil cxampli-s of motion pirtiin's and 
slidefilins usc<l wilii tilling i-tli-il for pulilic \\v\- 
fare campaigns. This month hroughl fonr new 
i-xamples of noteworthy and varied applications 
ranging from the subject of fair employment 
practices through the themes of public health 
education. Zionist fund raising, and the tenth 
addition to the film librar> of the Womeirs 
Christian Temperance I nioii. 

The Case for Fair Employment 

Sponsor: Illinois Slate Chamber of Commerce. 
Title: It's Good Business. 272 slides 1 34 niin.) 

.'i5 sd., b. & w.. produced by Francisi^o Films, 

Chicago. 
* The highly controversial subject of racial 
<liscriniiiiatiiiii is temporarily quiescent at the 
nation's capital but the Illinois State Chamber 
of Commerce is going ahead with its overall 
program of tackling the matter, from the stand- 
point of economics. The Chamber, convinced 



that the screen provides the most effective focus 
of interest of public and management, presents 
it« case for voluntary, not legislative, solution 
of the picibleiii uilli till- ^lidililrii It's Cooil 
liiisiiifss. 

At the preview in the Cliiiago studios of 
Francisco Films, which, it was announced, pro- 
duced the film at cost, Ormond Lyman, execu- 
tive vice president of the Chamber, and Loren 
K. Hutchinson, manager of its personnel and 
labor relations de|)aitin(nt. said that the mem- 
bership has expressed itself in favor of "con- 
crete action short of legislation" and that co- 
operative action by business, labor, religious, 
educational and civic interests has been un- 
precedented. 

This is the first screen endeavor of the Illi- 
nois Chamber but more will follow if results 
parallel the widespread interest indicated by 
advance requests for showings, according to 
Robert James, association publicity director. 

The cooperation of Chicago newspapers in 
lco.^TI.^UED ON pace forty -five) 



FIRMS SHOW "ITS GOOD BUSINESS" TO HIRE ON MERIT 




INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER doPsnt segre- 
milf iforkiTs in ils various i>lnnts. 



CARSON PIRIE SCOTT & CO. placps capabil- 
ity us a prinii' rfijiiisilr for office jobs. 



.1 


J _. .. _. 


i^pB <i| ^vW 


i 




i^^ 


•^ 








r.lllCACOS Dl'NIIAR TRADE SCHOOL IS one 
of many turninn out skilled uorkers. 



H. II. KONNK.l.LKV fignrcs that skill dorsn't 
di'ftrnd on rncr or ri-li/cion. 




COMPANY EXKCtTIVKS lUsrliss tile "Good lilisi- 
nrss" liirinf! iicoplf on ihi- basis of ability: 
a Sf4-nr front llir iifir Illinois Chamber visual 
lirofiram note available in llial state. 

Vermont's State Department of Health 
Promotes Local Medical Checkups 

Sponsor: Department of Health. State of 

Vermont. 
Title: At Uur House, 10 mill., b&w, produced 

by Promotional Films Company. 

•k This story is a little drama about a typical 
family with a great deal to live for. A wood- 
working business they have started is prosper- 
ing, everyone seems to l)e in good health and the 
future seems secure. 

.\s they start lunch one day, the radio an- 
nounces that all people in the town are urged to 
go to the health center for a multiple health 
screening check-up. Father protests at the waste 
of time for such a healthy family as they, but 
mother prevails and they shut up shop and go. 

Everyone but father comes through the tests 
in fine shape, but exeii luckier for him. his pre- 
vious undiscovered diabetes is recognized in its 
earliest stages. His doctor assures him he may 
live a normal life to a ripe old age because it 
was discovered and treatment begun early. 

ll"s a very simple story, but an effective one. 
Dramatic, but lacking in the cloying hokum 
many times reserved for the '"simple family 
drama."' Much of this is due to honest por- 
trayals by the non-professional actors under 
good direction. Live sound is used throughout. 



International Zionist Organization 
Sponsors Film for Overseas Campaign 

Sponsor: Women's International Zionist Organ- 
ization. 

Title: The \'illap.e Tale. 3.5 min.. b*w. pro- 
duced by Palestine Fibns. directed by George 
I,. George. 

■¥■ This is the story of an immigrant family 
from Yugoslavia starting life anew in Israel. 
The small settlement where they find a new home 
is dilT<Tent and more prhnitive than anything 
lliev have known before. Adjustment In life in 
the new cominuiiitN is not eas\ . 

Eventually, after much trial their personal 
problems are solved, bv each in his own way. 
The film shows how the Women's International 
Zionist Organization helps the family to be- 
come established. 

\^'liat is notable about the picture, a very 
simple story, is the freshness of the acting (by 



30 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



inon-professionals) and the human appeal of the 
InaiTation. Dirt-ctor George has acroniplished 
la remarkable job of coiiihiiiiiig a first person 
narration over his well chosen, good looking 
village people to produce a heart Uiirtning story 
that holds interest from beginning to end. 

The I ilia lie Tale was made for use in almost 
ievery country in the world except the U. S. for 
Ifund raising and general itiforniational purposes 
by the W.I.Z.O.. which corresponds to the 
Hadassah organization in America. Six lan- 
guage versions have been made. The American 
version will be seen here as a theatrical re- 
lease. 



Women's Christian Temperance Union 
j Directs New Film to Student Audiences 

♦ The alcohol problem and what to do about 
;il has been approached from several directions 
'in recent films. The latest is I'uhlic F.ni'iin 
\No. 1, produced for the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union and the tenth in its extensive 
library. 

The newest exposition bv the W.C.T.l'. is 
from the medical viewpoint and is directed to- 
ward high school and college students. Mere 
a doctor, on a vacation trip with his two sons, 
tells them how alcohol beverages are produced 
and sold, how thev impair health, breed crime 
and vice, affect the economy by the huge liquor 
bill of till" nation, and multipK accidents be- 
cause of drunken driving. 

In the \V.(;.T.L'. film released in February 
of lO.SO. The Vicious Circle, the storv was of a 
man's mistaken effort U> drown realil\ bv drink- 
ing, and how he was rehabilitated. 

Both films were produced in California by 
Fred S. Niemann Productions of Chicago and 
are available for purchase in either color or 
black and white, from the W.C.T.l'. headquar- 
ters at 17.50 Chicago Ave. in Evanston, III. 

The \\.(!.T.l . long since turned to the mo- 
tion picture to get its storv before America 
with the widest and fastest means of circulation. 
It l>egan its film program thirteen years ago. 
With units in every state, down to district, 
county and r-ity. and in Alaska. Hawaii and 
Puerto Kico. the W.C.T.l'. has a huge potential 
audience for its films, with 2.'i departments to 
operate its educational services. 

Unlike the Temperance and Tolerance Asso- 
ciation of America, the W.C.T.l . stands for 
total abstinence. • 



**PI BI.K. KNKMV NO. I" is the subject of this 
Mcviiv from the nnc If C.Tl film ttj ihni ininic. 





HOW A 
WATCH WORKS 




Above: plastic parts become a model Hatch . . . ns infinite care is shoun in precision craftsmanship. 



Precise Story of a Timepiece 
Told in This Hamilton Watch Picture 

Spon^or: Hamilton Watch Company. 

Title: //«!( a K atch If ork.s. l."> min., color, pro- 
duced by The Jam Handy Organization. 

■*■ Everyone agrees that a watch is a most com- 
plicated mechanism: only a foolhardx laymati 
will tinker with it. In Time The .Senaiil of 
Man, sponsored by the Elgin National Watch 
Companv and distributed bv Modern Talking 
Picture .Service, emphasis was on the bmadttr 
as|)ects of progress in the measurement of lime 
and the relation betwe«"n astronomy and time- 
recording devices of man. In the Hamilton 
Watch Company's new film. Htm- a If atch 
If orks. the subject is brought down to and 
within <-ases, with an easy-to-understand anal- 
ogv to familiar mechanisms. 

Eirst are e\|ilaini-<l liable sti-ps in the action, 
b) using enlarged model watch parts, built to 
scale from Plexiglas, Piece by piece the parts 
are assembled as a narrator tells of the func- 
tion of each. Then, with stop-motion pliolog- 
raphv the model parts change into aitual unlch 
|>arts which mo\e into alignment, throughout 
bopeaking the precision and accuracy of the 
finished inslrumenl. 

Till- film, for showing to Haniillon emp|oye!>. 
jeweler*, trade groups. «<'rvice clubs and M-hools, 
is axailable free loan, excepting one-wa\ trans- 
portation cohI. bv writing the .^ale<t Promotion 
Di-partmenI, Hamilton \\ ati h (!ompan>, I.ancas- 
li-r. Penn. 

Oni' important In -product use of such films b\ 
the Hamilton orgatiization is in the recruiling 
of emplo\ees through whool showinf^. Fihn« 
have proven a valuable asM-l in that field. * 



Helping Ford Supervisors to Evaluate 
Importance of Work Standards on the Job 

Spon.sor: Eord Motor Company, Training De- 
partment. 
Title: Sleerinfi uilh Standards. 20 niin.. I'\w. 
produced by MPO Productions. 

•k This picture po.HCS a proldem for each Ford 
supervisor: if he were in business for hims<'lf. 
how would he allocate his work load equitably 
to maintain full sjieed production an<l still cut 
costs':* 

One foreman is lran>posed into such a dream 
situation in .S/eertng uilh Slnndards. finds com- 
plexities and problems he had never considerol 
before. 

His attitude, which had never Ihtu either 
negative or positive about work standards ap- 
plication to bis departuienl. b<t°i>mes more than 
reieptivc to the help work standards men can 
give him on resuming his workadax role. 

Siferinf, uilh Standards is an attitude devel- 
opment film, designed to full\ explain what work 
standards are and avoid any possible fi-eling 
of resentment among foremen abou: outsiilr 
inli-rfereni-e in their de|Hirlinents. 

It »liows how lrninr«l mm can spot causes 
of bottlenecks in prinluclion lines, workers with 
loo many, or tiM> dilTiivh, o|)erations to |irrfomi 
in a given time, and workers with loo lil.le |o 
do. Il aUo shows the training and standards 
men in the work stamlards tlepartmenl mu.«l 
maintain to l>e able |o do the job suiirssfullv. 

^^^*^^^ Ford superviMtn will see that film. Il 
is not designed to sell an\ methixls s|iecifically, 
but lo show one group how the other works 
and make them rnrplixe lo coo|M*ralion on 
work slanilards projr<-|s. • 



N I M H K R 1 



\ Ol 1 M y I 



I 'I .S I 



31 



Three Medicol Films in Color 
Completed by Sturgis-Crant 

♦ Sturcis-Crant Phodi'itions Iui> 
romplclcil ihreo new rnjiir. snunil 
iiKitiiiii |ii4'tiirfs in tlic nicilical field. 

The Malf Sr\ flornmne. 24 mill.. 
for the Sclii'riiig (lorporiiliuii, con- 
cerns ihe physiology and clinical 
aspe<'ts of hormone intcr-uction in 
the mule. Spanish and Knglish ver- 
sions are avaiiahle to iiu-diiai 
schutils and eollepes. 

The Rone Bank. 28 miii.. for the 
New York SiK-ietv fi>r the Relief 
of the Ruptured and Crippled, de- 
scribes methods of organizing a 
refrigerated hone i>ank. and how 
such hone is used. It is intended 
for orthopedic surgi-ons and hos- 
pitals. 

From One Cell, !.'{ niin.. for liu- 
American Cancer Society, is a bi- 
ology film on cell division and its 
relation to human development. It 
is avaiiahle to high schools and 
colleges from local chapters of the 
Society. 

Two Fire Prevention Films 
Give Pointers to Workers 

♦ Kire (irevention is the subject of 
two new films being distributed by 
the NATtoN.M. Safkty Council. 
Sarra. Inc.. produced the 15-minute 
subjects available both in 16mm 
sound motion picture and sound 
slidefilms. Ray Mueller directed, 
with technical supervision by Alben 
M. Baltzer and Glenn Griffin of the 
Council. 

Cause for .ilariii shows three 
plant workers learning about differ- 
ent kinds of fires and types of dis- 
tinguishers for each. Stop the Fire 
Thief is a lesson on why substances 
bum, with suggestions on preven- 
tion of fires in plants. 

Here's a Film That Lives Up 
To Its Name When Revived 

♦ A film made thirteen years and 
dug out of the files bv accident. 
by the Committee on Medical Mo- 
tion Pictures of the American Med- 
ical Association, is living up to its 
title. They Live Apain. The pic- 
ture, made by Metro-Gold wyn- 
Maver. is robustly renewing its life 
and the Committee has a problem 
meeting the demand. 

The picture was brought out for 
the f:ampaign for legitimate us4' of 
animals in experimentation, as it 
dramatizes the discovery of insulin 
and the use of animals in research 
by Banting and Best. 

The California chapter of the Na- 
tional Society for Medical Research 
reported that the film was more 
efre<-tive than speakers and that 
eight re(|uests for showings were re- 
ceived in <me day. The chapter 
pleaded for two more prints. 



32 




othi 



thi 



Montanio Ch«m*col Co 



Thomal A Ed<u>n Inc ^ o 

Curt.M.V*.9l,l Cofp '<>>^">n t lot,„, 



Typf exfrrvyst'^ u tiirifly ttf moods ... or it complexity of tominm\ irfiltl.\. 

Craftsman in Title-Making 

CHICAGO SFKCIALIST SKR\ KS NATIONW IDK CLIKNTKI.K 



♦ Film production requires the 
headwork and handicraft of a vari- 
ety of uiipuldicized experts whose 
conlrii)ulioMs are as essential in 
their niche as are those of the di- 
rector. There's the research man. 
digging out and sifting facts but 
unnoticed unless an error of nanie 
or fact creeps into the finished 
work, a 1950 invention into an 
1850 sequence. There's the studio 
artist . . . and there's the specialist 
who turns out titles and credit 
lines. . . 

To say that titles can ''make or 
break" a production would lie an 
overstatement. Iiut thev are as im- 
portant as type selection and dis- 
play is to an advertisement. Film 
producers recognize outstanding 
artistry in title-making. Thai's why 
there is a constantly increasing flow 
of orders from all over the coun- 
try, including the largest producers, 
to the Knight Studios, which is to 
say to Ivend Krohn. 

Facilities to Match .Neeils 

The studio, at 341 East Ohio 
.Street in Chicago, is as unpreten- 
tious as its owner, hut that both 
are doing their jobs was evident. 
In one corner is a press for stamp- 
ing the hot type for each slide- 
through leaf foil onto a sheet of 
cellulose acetate. The combination 
of heat and pressure produces a 
cleancut and <leei) impression of ab- 
solute uniformity for each letter. 
The use of "cells" has for the most 
part supplanted that of hard and 
tinted card. Krohn said, because 
the shade of tint will vary in the 
card stock, sometimes in the same 
lot. The white foil used by the 
Knight Studios, incidentally, is 
made from a special formula. 

Krohn believes the type face 
should fit the subject matter, as well 
as the light conditions of the scene 
against which it is to appear, and 
that above all the final determi- 
nant must be clarity. Massive sub- 
jects like ships and locomotives call 



for heavy, bold type, placed for 
maximum contrast. A scene such 
as the one behind the trout title, 
with its wide variation of light to 
ilark. requires a straightforward, 
legible type. The slide carrying a 
number of company names was 
handled with a sans-serif type, and 
the challenge of positioning was 
met bv giving each name promi- 
nence through avoidance of mon- 
otony, the while effecting overall 
artistry. 

In W idespreail Demand 

No wonder the Knight Studios' 
business has been on a constant in- 
crease. "Every year since I opened 
my first studio seven years ago." 
Krohn noted. "I have seen the busi- 
ness sliow a marked increase over 
the preceding twelve months, with 
the one exception of a short period 
following the war." 

Knight Studios concentrates on 
the use of Ludlow tv[)e. Certainly 
Krohns convictions in the matter 
have the background of ex|)erience. 
For ten years he was head of the 
typographical section of the adver- 
tising department of the Ludlow 
Tvpograph (!(inipa!iv. 

Casting fresh 1\|h' for each slide 
iiiainlains even reproduction, he ex- 
plained. Handsctting from standing 
type could not avoid occasional 
loss of sharp definition, because of 
worn letters, and setting by lino- 
type does not insure the uniformity 
obtained with Ludlow. 

Light type against a dark back- 
ground seems to be the preference 
of most film producers. Krohn said. 
.Standard colors often are used in 
printing the type, sometimes in 
{'oniiiinalion with black or white, 
often with a black block effect be- 
hind light type against a dark back- 
ground. Where a title is to be 
superimposed upon a scene, the 
predominant colors of the scene of 
course determine the color in which 
the type is printed. Light tyi>e 
against a color background usually 
is preferred to running the type in 



I olor. if for no otiier reason 
the lowi-r cost. 

\ good looking title is achievt 
\i\ following the same rules 
Ivpography as in setting up an a 
tractive advertisement, according 
the slide |)ro(lucer. 

Hcadaliilitv is the first law 
(itl<- making. Krohn said, and <■ 
centricities of sponsor, film pr 
ducer or agency |)crsonnel can 
expensive and destructive. 

One common fallacy, he emph 
sized, is the tendency to attein| 
to say too much in a single slid 
necessitating the use of small 
condensed type that the audient 
either passes up or reads with dif 
cultv. perha|)S resentfully. Allollin 
two or even three slides to tl 
wordage would put over th 
thought effectively, in instance 
where the wording could not li 
shortened. Condensed type is usab 
to advantage in small amounts fu 
contrast, as is a short sequence 
capital letters: much of either i~ 
mistake. 

The selection of t\pe-famil 
should be determined by the sul 
ject matter, just as in an advei 
tisement. Bold sans-serif or squar 
serif type in titles of a film descril 
ing embroidery is as out of plac 
as a light and thin-serifed scri[ 
title for an airplane engine filn 
In both cases, however, if the typ 
cannot be read readily it costs th 
sponsor money. Furthermore, 
Krohn pointed out, any rule 
made to be violated if the sellinj 
effect is achieved, and a judiciou 
mixture and placement of types 
the cure for sameness. 



Type selection matrbex content. 




SERVICES AVAILABLE NOW! 
SPECIALIST IN AV AIDS 

Can develop training programs tor 
New Defense Production. 

Public Relations WorkPlationn and 
Lecture Experience. 

Sales and Promotion Projects — Con- 
ventions. 

Hove had years ol experience in in- 
dustry, commerce and education. 

Moderate salary to slon. Chicago 
resident. Can travel if necessary. 

Best of references. 

Box 2C BUSINESS SCREEN 

150 E. Superior St., Chicago, 11. • 



BISINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




IHK l'H()T()(iK AI'H aliove »how» our now miiiihI ntu^f. Tin- ^Ieal^y fsrowtli of «iir l»u»i- 
nenK and tlir shortaffc of xtiidio »|>ace in thr New ^ ork un-a lu- iiiuilc il iiii|irartiral to 
ronliniir mitinjr -pare from sprvirr utmlios. 

Convenient ly luruted in Muliiirliun Mlneola. Ixin): l!<laii<l. le'o llinn forty niinuten 
from Times S(|tiure. tlie new Htmlio lia« iiiuii> advantu<:e!<. Not the lea«l of llieM- it the 
availaliility of all kiniU of pliolnjiraiiliir location^ uitliin a few iiiintile> of the >liidio. 

IJe!<i);necl and liiiill from tin- ground ii|> a> .1 iiiolinn |>ii-liire Miiind .-tiidici. the new 
huililinp afTordH prodiietion eonilitionK in line with the lale«l eii):ineerin): |iraetieri>. From 
lioth the aeouHlie and the pholo^raphie Htunilpointi>. il kIiowh the rare ami preeinion to hr 
expelled from the ipiarter eenliirx of mo\ ie-iiiakinu kiiou-hou that we lirini: to all our 
prodiielinn'. lar^e or tmall. 



LESLIE ROUSH PRODUCTIONS, Inc 



Sofes and Editorial Offices 

333 West 52nd Street, New Yorh 19, N. Y. 

COIumbus 5-M30 



Studios ond Shops 

130 Herricks Road. Hineolo. L. I.. N. Y. 

GArden City 7-8130 



I r M B K R I 



\ I I M K 12 



Iflj 1 



33 



In fhe^ 




Four New AT&T Sound Films 
Available for Loan from Bell 
♦ Four iK-w siiuiul tiliiis, all avail- 
able on free loan from >our local 
IWI Sysleni telephone company, 
have lieen released In the Ameri- 
can Telephone and Telegra[>li Com- 
pany. 

The fTorld at Your Call, in color 
and both 16- and 35nmi, points to 
modern long distance telephone 
service as high value received at 
low cost. Scenes of beauty and his- 
torical interest at home and abroad 
are connected by telephone epi- 
sodes, and by animation against a 
segment of the globe. Locations in- 
clude the White Mountains. New 
Orleans, Washington, D.C Oak 
Creek Canyon. Arizona. Oregon. 
St. Augustine. Kla., London and 
New York City. The film runs lit 
minutes. 

Telephone Cable to Cuba. 15 
minutes, 16- and ."^Smm. shows the 
techniques of laying the Key West- 
Havana underwater coaxial cables. 
Retraced arc the years of prepara- 
tion, development of the tiny re- 
peater built into the cable to insure 
trouble-free service, and the laying 
of the cable from the new shi|). 
the Lord Kelvin. 

Tenth in Review Series 

Telephone Screen Review (Num- 
ber 10). in both 16- and ."iSmm 
and running 10 minutes, has three 
sequences. First is shown the cable 
splicer, joining myriad wires in 
building, expanding and repairing 
vast networks. At the Western Elec- 
tric Company, precision machines 
turn out tiny lenses, called lamp 
caps, for switchboards. Finally is 
seen a home-confined youngster go- 
ing to school by phone and par- 
ticipating in classroom discussion 
by a new electronic method. 

The fourth production is Tele- 
phone Relays •'(■'■ and "Y" Type. 
in two parts, the first taking 19 
minutes to run, the s<'cond 2.S. This 
film is only 16mni. I'art i gives 
background information on the im- 
portance of complete adjustment, 
manufacture of the two types of 
relays and the physical and elec- 
trical improvements introduced. 
Part II, with highspei-d (FastaxI 
photography, dis<-usses differences 
between the two kinds of relays, 
common causes of relay trouble, 
improvements of product, effect of 
magnetic inlerferi-m <■ from adja- 
cent relays, and the importance of 
following circuit requirement tables 
and Hell practices. 



NEWS ABOUT FILMS AND PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 



Camera Functions in Industry 
Explained in Eastman Subject 
♦ I'hf camera us a workin-- tool of 
business and the many sit\ ices of 
photographic methods and tech- 
niques in research, produclion. qual- 
\l\ control, advcrlisiiif; and sali's arc 
surveyed in Funcliiuiai I'liolOjiraphy 
in Industry, available from the Kasl- 
man Kodak Company on free loan 
to technical and industrial groups. 

From examples of s|)eci(ic prod- 
ucts or problems and the photo- 
graphii- tec hnique applied to them 
tile liliii provides an approach for 
use bv other luisiiii-.-sriien and coni- 
I)anies. 

Shown are uses of photographic 
techniques for instant recording, 



liighspeed studies, engineering re- 
production, template-making, mctal- 
lurgv. stress mea-iircmcnl. specto- 
graphic aiialvsis ajid ticoiogic survey 
work. Much <•{ llic pKiduction is on 
Kodachrome iilni. but black-and- 
white is used in such fields as high- 
speed studies. The 16 mm. film runs 
36 minutes. 

Write the Industrial Photographic 
Division. Kastman Kodak Company, 
.343 Stale St.. Huchester 1. N. Y. 

USDA Color Films Available 
♦ Prints of the USDA color films. 
Outbreak. Steel Rust and KilUnfi 
W eeds uilh 2. 4-U now are avail- 
able for purchase from United 
World Fihns, Inc. 




SYLVANIA ELECTRIC PRODUCTS INC. 
RADIO AND TELEVISION DIVISION 









PATHESCOPE PRODUCTIONS 

MOTION PICTURES • SLIDEFILMS • TV 

StO FIHH AVENUE, NEW YO«K 19, N. r. 

PLAZA 7-5200 




Starllis ii„i„i'h\ Abbott and Ouruthy 
Ford are jealured in "Let Yourself Go." 

Glamour and an Oil Drop Share 
Honors in New Rocket Pictures 

♦ First ripurls [ruin the field redect 
inlcrcstcd audience reception of two 
recent productions, by KocKET PlC- 
TLRES. Inc., one a 20-ininute slide- 
film for a maker of swim suits, the 
other a series of one-minute televi- 
sion spots for an oil company. 

Swim suits should be fitted, not 
sold over the counter. That's the 
theme ])ut over for the Rose Marii 
OF California company by /.' ; 
Yourself Co. slidefilm featuring Dor- 
othy Ford of MGM and Dorothy 
Abbott, former contract player at 
Paramount. Versatilitv of fit demon- 
strated on the different heights of 
the players is another sales point. 

First of a series of slidefilms on 
the business side of glamour. Let 
Yourself Go is directed toward 
showing the salesgirl how to sim- 
plify her job and increase sales. 

Color Film on Rock Island's 
Freight Service New Release 

♦Kmkct Freight.-, closeui) of classi- 
fication yards in operation, and 
views of agricultural and industrial 
areas highlight If heels oj Progress. 
the Rock Island Lines' 16 mm. 
sound-color picture of freight serv ■ 
ice. an carlv release. 

Produced by the Zenith Film 
Corporation of Chicago, the 20- 
minute picture will be circulated 
free through the oflfice of W . F. 
Haves, publiw n-lalions director. 13") 
\\ . \ an liiircn St.. Chicago .S, 111. 

Film Record of Pipeline Job 

♦ Progress reports on film kept tli' 
public and companv personnel ii 
lout li with each slc|) of prodnctii'i 
when the TENNESSEE CfAS Tran- 
MISSION Company, of which Conr:i.l 
H. Collier is public relations dire, 
tor, extended its pipeline from 
northwestern Kentucky to BufTaJi'. 
N. ^ . Newsreel crews making tin 
16nwn. color movies traveled 4.(M'0 
miles. Fach s<ene was introduced 
by a title, date and map. 



34 



B r S I N E S -S SCREEN M .A G .* Z I N f 



More ikn Ifme/tt - (/R&Q^ / 




H^ 



W^^ 



c^;>-A 



<« 



A Documentary Film That Shows 

HOW TO SAVE LIVES AND PREVENT PANIC 
IN CASE OF ATOMIC ATTACK 

By Alberto Baldecchi 

Feoturing WILLIAM L. LAURENCE, noted Scientific Writer 
for The New York Times — the only newspoperman who 
covered the entire Atomic project. 

Filmed with the cooperation of the Armed Forces and the 
American Red Crost. 

IN CASE OF ATOMIC ATTACK . . . 

What would happen in your plant? Are you prepared? 

Here is a 20-minuie sound film thai shows you whai lo do when you 
get warning . . . what to do if you get no warning . . . where to find shelter 
inside or outside of buildings . . . what materials for survival you need in your 
factory, office, school or home . . . how to cleanse yourself of radioactivity . . . 
how defense workers are prepared to protect you . . . and much more 
practical, essential information that can save many lives. 

A FILM FOR EVERYBODY — NO SHOCKING SCENES 

You see people at work, at home, driving, etc., during the 

kind of air raid that may hit your city. You ualch these people 

defend themselves against blast, heat and death-dealing 

radiation. 

Also, this well-planned film shows graphically how the 

atomic bomb works and why it is so dangerous. You see 

views of atomic explosions that are released here to 

the public for the first time. 

Through action and drama, PATTERN FOR SURVIVAL tells 

you how to stay atiit in an atom blast. Industrial, retail, 

civic and business organizations all over the country 

are ordering this new film by the hundreds, now. 

Show PATTERN FOR SURVIVAL in your plant! Its the best 

kind of public relations . . . and good sense. 



.•••. 



f/GHT fBAR WITH KNOWlfDGf . . . AND YOU 
MAY NOT HAVE TO fIGHT PANIC LATER. 



^ArriMN fOn SUHVIVAL hoi b»»n icreened and opproved by: 
Initltute ef Life Iniurome 
Am«rl<an Cyanomld Company 
National Aitoclotlon of Manufactwrora 
Fordham Univorilty 

N«w York Citr Dopartmont «f Hoolfh 
Now York Stato Civil Dofonio Comntlidon 
Now Hampihiro Offico ef Civil Dolonio 
Or dor of Ma ton i, Doportmonf of Hoi pi toll 
Inlornotlonol Munlc ipol Signal Aiioclollon 

^ and many o'hor (ompanloi and orpaAJiaf lona. 

Avoffob/e In 16mm townd: co/or and blatk -artd-whfte 

A«k for Ihif vital Rim at your film library. Or phone, write or 

wire lo Cornell Film Company today. 

CORNELL FILM COMPANY 

1501 Broadway. New York 18, N. Y. 



'ne picture m ^ 

^' of .nqu>/ */r^*' '«'' « num- 
**» of our uff L '"'°"' "'""• 
^^ ocrorc j?roup$.- 
AMHiCAN CYANAU,r^ , 
'■•^■.>nA;t;t:"^'r«o,,cro., 
l""f deal ofijj" 'fP'-^mts a 

MANOfACru««s 
defense.- * "»"nt in . 



AL 



*^'> ^n^A,S COU.S SAY: 

»"h the spht l^L"*'."" of '-v-nx 
'«"°''.nheU",'it;''!^'P«>- 

* »Of|£mjnlj|(c. job ' ' ' .'^ "^ " 
•Frn J NOS^ifAlj 



N I M B K K 1 



\ O L I M K 1 : • 1 V i 1 



3S 




ON THE rRODlICIION LINE 



\B<ni: U ill mm I'ouris llrltl AHA 
fxecutiif prtsrnly film to Kntfiers' fires- 
idem Rohm C. (.lolhirr. Robert Bell, 
proiilirer. i\ in renter 'see story below). 

Bonking Film Presented University 

♦ l{ulf;iTs I niversily was presented 
with till- first print of a sound and 
color fdni recently completed for 
the Amkhkan Bankkks Associa- 
tion, at a cereinoiiv participated in 
bv Dr. Hol«'rt C Clothier, univer- 
sity president; William Powers. 
A.B.A. exe«-utive in charge of the 
Graduate School of Banking: and 
Hohert lii-ll. liutgers alumnus and 
s<x'relar> -treasurer of F'ilnismiths, 
Inc., producer. 

The film. The Graduate School 
of Bankinp, 12-minute sound and 
color, was made on the campus of 
the unixersitv at New Brunswick. 
N. J., during the two-week summer 
session, necessitating close liming 
of camerawork. The production, to 
be shown nationally to banker 
groups, also is to be used for tele- 
vision. 

Financial Report Film Aids 
Teamwork at Standard Oil 

* L.-x' of the .s( rrrii In inject life 
and color into annual financial re- 
ports of large companies pays off 
not onlv in improved community 
understandinj; but in employe inter- 
est and resullanlK increased team- 
work. Standard Oil Company ( In- 
diana) notes that its 15-minute 
.sound-slidefilm helped its 47.()IH) 
personnel to a larger sense of par- 
ticipation in the companys activi- 
ties through better appreciatir>n of 
the contribution of their productive 
and cooperative efforts to the prog- 
ress of the concern. 

First, supervisors were called to- 
gether for diixussion group lonfer- 
enccs. A press luncheon was held 
the day before the report was re- 
leased to the public. OITicials pre- 
sented the story, using iharls. and 
then repeated the discussion with de- 
partment heads. Loral managers re- 
ceived guidebooks for meetings. 
There were 191 conferences, with a 
discussion leader showing the film 
and another leader explaining the 
balance sheet line-bv-line. A visual 



breakdown of the customer dollar 
fcdiowcd. 

Conger He\nidds. public- rela- 
tions ilirector. planned the program. 

Minute Movies on Safety Give 
A Rule on Each Sound Trailer 
* A new direction of the National 
-Safety Council's audio-visual ac- 
tivities is a series of Operation 
Stijety Minute Movies, made by 
\X'ilding Picture Productions, with 
sponsorship by the National Asso- 
ciation of Automotive Mutual In- 
surance Companies. 

The sound film trailers, for 
theatres, television and group show- 
ings, tell personal experiences, with 
each production a complete story 
demonstrating one rule for safety 
of driver and pedestrian. 



Dealers Request Extra Prints 
Of Outboard Racers' Thriller 

♦ \\ lien till- publics ilemands re- 
([uire distributors to buy two and 
three extra copies of a sponsor's 
film, no further testimony to the 
production and promotion values 
of the subject is rc(|uire(l. That is 
what liappened in the case of the 
new sports action film, Green 
Blazes, made for the Kiekiiakfeh 
Aeromarinf. Motor.s, Inc., of Fond 
du Lac. Wis., builders of Mercury 
outboard motors and air-colleged 
engines. 

I lie sound und color recording 
of an outboard race over an ob- 
stacle course at Cypress Gardens. 
Fla.. literally lakes the pilots over 
the hurdles as well as swishing 
across dry land harriers and 



'Treasure Island 





A scene fnim *'Green Hlazes" 

through narrow water lanes in 
dense groves. 

The promotion took several turn- 
l)( sides the 16mm film. A 35mni 
black and white version is show 
ing in theatres as a Grantland Rid 
.Sportlight. National magazines ami 
syndicated newspaper sections ai' 
publishing picture stories of tlr 
event: newsrecis have been n- 
leased, and bookings of the spon- 
sor's black and white prints for 
television are extensive. 

The widespread interest in thi- 
production has stepped up th' 
tempo of the sponsors film pro 
gram. Two or three additional film- 
are now contemplated for this yeai 
A motion picture on fishing is prai 
lically completed. 

I he sales message in Greet 
Blazes is limited strictly to tb' 
\ isual as an integral part of th' 
story. Commercialism has ben 
kept out of the narrative, in •■■•. 
nizance of increasing objection- ■ 
1 \ outlets to showing entertain 
nient films on a sustaining basis it 
the advertising element is pro 
iiounced. Increasing competition 
for the attention of .school, club 
and organizational audiences raise- 
similar resistance to blatant "sell 
ing" in sponsored films. 

Two additional current film- 
from the Kiekhaefer company an- 
Sharkins: ■ ■ . But True and Out 
hnanl Thrills and Spills. Both were 
shot in Florida waters. 

Sharkiiifi . . . Bui True is a 
sportsman's thriller of big game 
fishing from a It-foot outboard 
runabout. The rod-and-reel hunts- 
men prove their skill in vanquish- 
ing a .sailfish. Sabre-tooth shark and 
a vicious barracuda. 

Oiitlionrd Thrills and .'Spills is 
what the title says: rough-riding 
sequences of outboard gymnastics 
on the Rogue River. 

All three films are free-loan for 
showings at clubs, schools, churches 
and plants. 

Two Bermuda Films Completed 

♦ Two films on Bermuda recentiv 
■onipleted by Pan American Vt'oRi.n 



36 



BtSINESS SCREEN MA(;aZIN£ 



I Airways are College If eek in lit-r- 
muda. 10-ininiitf subject primarily 

I for college sludents of eastern aiul 
central states, and If inf^s to Ber- 
muda, half-hour film with sound, in- 
cluding' nui-ic. taken on location. 

Flying Classroom Tour Shown 
In Air Transport Color Film 
♦ The screen |)ro\ ide> a ino>l co- 
operative ally of the unusual, and 
the Flying Classroom, sponsored by 
Michigan State College on a Euro- 
pean lour by chartered Slratocrui- 
ser, was a "iialurar" for a .'iO-miri- 
I ute color film made \<\ (Immtai 
'Film Prodi cTIOns. Fast Lansing. 
' Vlich.. for the AiR Tkanspokt As- 

-()( lATlON. 

Ill Overseas Fl-tiiifi Classroom. 
-iilijeit matter has precedence over 




A Chirch in Helsinki. Finland, 
u background for a scene in Over- 
seas Flying Classroom, made by 
Capital Film Produclions for the 
Air Transport Association. 



chronology of the tri[i of ihc t<rt 
sludents sludving jiost-uar recovery 
under the Marshall I'lan. Shown are 
French factories, Cermaii steel mills, 
lumbering operations in Finland 
and Norway. Dutch and Italian agri- 
culture, besides tourist attra<'tions. 
The production was dircded and 
photographed by James Kobert 
i Hunter, owner of Capital. KIdon 
I Bobbins, advertising manager of 
I the John l?ean Division of the Ma- 
chinerv and (!hemical (^irporatinn, 
was assi>lant photographer and 
scenario writer. 




Scene in "Career Jar 1 omorrow'' 



COAST GUARD REVIEW 



TiTl.K: Career for Tomorrow. 
.Sponsor: Coast Guard Academy — 

Coast Guard Photographic Unit 

in cooperation with Caiii[)us Film 

Produclions. 
♦ Career for Tomorrou is the slorv 
of the I nited Stales Coast Guard 
Academy at New London, Conn. 

For several years the Coast Guard 
Photographic Unit has collected 
color footage taken in all parls of 
the world during the cruises aboard 
llie culler '"CampbeH" and s(|uare 
rigger "Eagle." Utilizing these 
beautiful scenic shots with scenes 
taken at the Academy, the film pre- 
sents a comprehensive picture of 
the training given the future of- 
ficers of the Coast Guard. 

Narrated by Dwight Weist. 
Career jor Tomorrow presents the 
highlights of four years at the 
Academy including introdu<-lion to 
the Academv. sludii»s and athletics. 
( ruises to Azores. England. Casa- 
blania, the arduous work aboard a 
s(|uare rigger, gunnery practice at 
sea. the famous "ring dance" cere- 
mony during final graduation week. 

The vigor and excitemenl of 
\iademy life and the romanci- of 
ihe cruisi'S are ail \i\idl\ pre- 
.s»-nted. 

Selection of scene* from almost 
thirty thousand feet of original 
(olor foolage and performance of 
all other film services was handled 
by Campus Film Produclions. 



TRANSMISSION "T" Stop Calibration 



DISIGNINC and 
MANUFACTURING 

Of 

Speclillzcd lens 

mountings ind 

equipment for 

16mm & 3Smm 

cameris 

Animation Equipment 

MOTORS lor 
Cini Special. Maurer 
and Bolei Cameras 



LENS COATING 



John C(em«ns — Erwin Harwood 

NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT 

INC. 

20 WEST 22*4 ST., HEW TOM II. a.T. 



RENTALS — SALES 

— SERVICE 

Eyefflo. Mitchell, 

Bell & Howell. Wall. 

Cine Special Caatris 



Bausch ft lomb 

"Balljr" lenses and 

others for Motion 

Picture Cameras 



MAKE FILM 
COMMERCIALS 
IN HOLLYWOOD FOR 
TELEVISION? 



NBC (Berle, Wynn, Hope) 
SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 
PONTIAC AUTOMOBILE • GENERAL 
PETROLEUM • STARKIST TUNA 
WHITE STAG SPORTSWEAR • RANCHO 
SOUP • CATALINA SWIMSUITS 
CRESTA BLANCA WINES • HOFFMAN 
TELEVISION • STOKELY-VANCAMP 
FROZEN FOODS • ACME BEER ... are 
representative of products and services 
advertised in films produced at TELEFILM 




TELEFILM made 

commercials are geared 

to readability' on tfie television 

receiver . . . to tlie impact upon tfie viewer 




TELEFILM PRODUCTION 
features experience and direct 
control of every step, using our own 
studios complete facilities including 
sound stage, ptiotograpfiy, recording, 
music arrangements. dubt)ing, film 
laboratory, animation, special effects, 
titles, prints. Tfie entire job-from script 
tfirough stiipping prints to stations - is 
fiandled from our one Hollywood location. 




Iditrliiert and agrncirt a/r initlrd to %ubmil iknr Irlr- 

vision pro'ietls lor analyus , budgetint, and rrrommrndaiion < 

.'irnJ lor Tt' ludilion Rett S-2 tthirk iltout m 

vcidt mngr ol Irehniqun. 



TELEFILM 

INCORPORATED 

HOllTWOOD 1«. OlIfOIHIA 



N t M II K R I 



\ n I 1 M h I : • 1 Q 51 



37 




George Long and Mory Holl 
Get New Handy Assignments 

* I raii>ffrri-tl In llir rililnrial dc- 
partnient of The Jam Handy Ok- 
CAMZATION are (Ik()R(;e W. Long 
and Mary Hoi.t. 

I/Onp, whii will wrilc spccifica- 
lions for rolai! training materials, 
had been midwest district manager 
for the Radiant Manufacliiring Com- 
pany and sales trainin>! adviser of 
the Crowley Milner (iompanv be- 
fore he joined Jam Handy, where he 
was an administrative assistant in 
Uie slidefilm department. 

Miss Holt, a freelance writer be- 
fore she entered the million picture 
department of Jam Handy, now will 
a.ssist in the production of television 
commercials in motion picture form. 

Kennedy Signed by Telefilm 

♦ Telefilm has signed John Mil- 
ton Kennedy, announcer on the Lux 
Radio Theatre, to appear in a series 
of TV commercials for General 
Petroleum. Ted Stromberger is su- 
pervising production for the West- 
Marquis Agency. 

Peanuts Perform in TV Films 

♦ l'eanul> lUNorl in live 20-second 
rV commercials produced by Sarra, 
Inc., for Peter Pan Peanut Butter, 
product of Derby FViods, Inc. Mr. 
Vacuum Cap sings and performs to 
a jingle. Production was supervised 
for Needham. Louis & Brorby 
agency by Alan Wallace, vice presi- 
dent and radio and TV director: 
S<ott Park, art director, and Chris- 
topher Ford. 

A Spot Recording Coverage 

* W In- n S e a b r o o k Farms at 
Bridgeton. N. J., decided upon a 
silver -dollar payroll promotion, 
camera crews of Filmsmiths. Inc., 
were flown to the Seabrook Farms 
Airport for a spot rccor<ling. The 
film.s provided a television news 
coverage for metropolitan stations, 
followed by regular circulation for 
general public relations. 



JVJiiJ^j^J in t h e M^M 



Freeze Plus Defense Production Slows TV Expansion 

Series on Air Raid Protection 




Color, New TV Stations Out 

♦ >c| |,i<..liii lion for T\' in SI will 
approximate half last vear's record 
7..SlM).(HI(l sets: color ap|M-ars im- 
possible in light of c-li'clronic de- 
fense assignments and even if the 
FCC freeze were lifted, equipment 
for new stations is "iiut" for the 
duration. That's the TV expansion 
jiiclun- for 1951. 

Rocket Pictures' Clever Commercials 

* liitroduci'd in the .series of TV 
spots for the Wy.nne Oil Company. 
the first three of which have been 
shown, is an animated oil drop to 
lill liiiw motor power increases as 
friction is cut down. The voice is 
that of Hal Sawyer of ABC-TV. the 
background narrative li\ Tdin IImti- 
lon. CBS sportscaster. 



♦ l)\.\AMi(. I'lLM.s. Inc. i.- making 
five 60-second films on what to do 
before and during an air raid. The 
project is being utiderlaken in co- 
operation with the New York City 
Oni(e of Civil Defen.se. Local TV 
stations will show the films. 

TV Series for White Stag 

* A scries <»f '\'\ connnercials for 
White Stac, Inc., spring and sum- 
mer sun togs fashiimers. is being 
produced in Hollywood by TELE- 
FILM, Inc., with eight models. II. 
Richard Seller of the Allen and 
(llcnaghen Agency and C. L. Bauni 
(if the sponsoring companv sii|i<r- 
\ ised shooting. 



MEMO TO: 

FROM: 

SUBJECT: 



All Sales Managers 
Rocket Pictures, Inc. 
HARNESSED DYNAMITE 



• That's right, we said 'harnessed dynamite' and we're referring 
to our new "Manpower Development" series of AGGRESSIVE 
SELLING. 

• Due to the increasing demand for specific portions of our 
sales training program, we've packaged the four following 15- 
minute sound slidefilms, which expertly cover the vital factors 
of TODAY'S selling market. 

HUMAN RELATIONS IN SELLING 

THE ATTITUDE THAT GETS BUSINESS 

(and keeps it) 

PRIDE IN PRICE 

ARE PROSPECTS DIFFERENT? 

• The material contained in these films is new — and timely — 
and was created by our staff of specialists in sales training, 
with a view to pre-conditioning your salesmen and developing 
replacements. 

• They stress the all-important issue of establishing and main- 
taining good customer relations. They create within your sales- 
men the proper attitudes and techniques towards himself, his 
company, his product, the price of his product and his prospect. 

We invite you to share the enthusiasm of hundreds of users 
of this packaged DYNAMITE and will welcome your in- 
quiries relative to this "Manpower Development" series. 

WRITE OR WIRE 




6108 SANTA MONICA BOULEVARD 



HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIFORNIA 



Atlas Promotes Lindquist 

♦ IS'OKMAN C. LlNDQlIST, elccic 

vice president of the Atlas Fil 
Cokporation a year after he joine 
the company as director of teli 
vision, will continue active cooperi 
tion with advertising agencies i 
tlic production of commercials. H 
also conducts a course in televisio 
advertising at DePaul L'niversitv. 

Three Join March of Time's 
New Television Department 

♦ \d(l.-<i 111 ihc -tall of the ne\ 
Television Department of the MaKi i 
OF Time are Richard Kroi.ik. Lii 
LiAN RiXEY and Jane Bartels. 

Krolik is project supervisor, unj 
der Director of Television -Arthur 
Tourtellot. for Marcfi of Tiiiu 
Through the Years, weeklv series o 
30-minute films combining March o 
Time issues with guest panel dis 
cussions. 0|>ening February 1 .t over 
ABC. the series is sponsored In thi 
Association of American Banks. 
Krolik. formerly assistant to Horace 
Schwerin of ."^cbwerin Research, 
headed the motion picture division 
studying audience reactions. 

Miss Rixey, who also will work 
on the new television series, was sue- 
cessiveK copy editor of Time, head 
of the Life news desk. Washington 
reporter and assistant editor of Life, 
and on special editorial project.*. 

Miss Bartels will do research for 
Crusade in the Pacific. 26-instalI- 
inent sequel to the Crusade in 
h.urope T\ series. She formerly was 
«ilh tlie Life Picture Bureau. 

Film Produced from TV Screen 
♦ A film produced bv focusing a 
motion picture camera on the view- 
ing screen of a television set starts 
into circulation among ^.50() rural 
communities of Canada this month, 
through the National Film Board 
and film libraries. The kinesco|ie. 
as this type of film is called, is 
seen as a boon to countrv audiences 
lacking full television. 

The Road to World Peace, made 
in New York, covers a discussion 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Lake Success between Lester 

tiearson. External Affairs Minister 

Lr Canada, and Sir lienegal Hau, 

united Nations delegate from In- 

•ELEVISUAL NOTES 

. The color film Truly Yours — The 
)ress That Fits, one of the televi- 
lion-dear subjects of the V. S. De- 
ARTMKNT OF AcRICL LTLRE, is HOW 

ivailahle in black and white for 
.iirchase from I nited \\ orld Films, 
iM .. I IIS Park Ave.. New York 29. 
• Tki.kvi.sio.n Ff.atlres, Inc., and 
I- subsidiary. General Business 

)lnis. have appointed the llarl- 
ii.in Advertising Agency of Syra- 
li-f as regional representati\e in 
iiitral New ^ ork slate. 
' jj) Lewis, former TV director 
I Hartley Productions, and 
.JMtlON Gerinc, producer-director 
lor Paramount f^ictures, have form- 
al G-L I-'nterprises. Inc.. 1619 
Broadway. New York City, to pro- 
luce television motion pictures. 

The first project completed is a 
-cries of svndicated commercials 
-r brewers. 



Pictures for Four Sponsors 
Completed by Sarra Studios 
I • Three productions recently com- 
) pleted by Sarra, Inc., for sponsor- 
(ing organizations include two color 
motion pictures and a color slide- 
film. In aoldition. shooting is un- 
derway for a series of 60-second 
and 20-second TV commercials for 
Taystee Bread. 

The motion pictures had their 
premieres at the close of a general 
sales meeting of the SlMI'LIciTY 
Manlfactlrinc Co.mpany in Pt. 
Washington, Wis. One, for show- 
ing to consumer groups and deal- 
ers' organizations, is For Your 
Land's Sake and shows Simpliiitv 
tractors doing 2}{ dilTiTcnt jobs. The 
other film. Clear Path to Profit, is 
a sales training picture, answering 
dealers' i|uestic)ns about the tractor 
and the market. 

The color slidefilm. Your Out- 



door \eiphbor, made for the Out- 
door Advertising Association, 
has locations spread from Holly 
uood to Washington, D.C., and 
shows .Secretarv of the Trcasurv 
John W. Snyder s|M-aking for the 
Savings Bond campaigns and Gen- 
eral George C. .Marshall for the 
American Red Cross. The film runs 
15 minutes. 

Sarra's Jo.seph G. Betzer, direc- 
tor of film planning, and Harry W. 
Lange, production manager, ad- 
dressed the Advanced Industrial 
.Safety Training Course conduileil 
by the National .Safelv (council in 
Chicago in mid-January. 

Business Rises 10 Per Cent, 
Alexander Tells Convention 

♦ Willi close to .S.i.OOO.IMM) paid to 
theatres for adM-rtising time and 
the sale of 2!{.(»(M) local screen ad- 
vertising campaigns, in addition to 
increased national bookings, the 
.Alexander Film Company's busi- 
ness in this field increased 10 per 
cent in 1950 and continues up- 
ward. President J. Don Alex- 
ander reported at the annual con- 
vention at Colorado .Springs. The 
company has 24.000 theatre screen 
advertiser accounts. 

The half-million dollar expansion 
of the plant in two vears includes 
tripling the size of the film process- 
ing laboratories and other facilities, 
and installation of new color proc- 
essing and sound ef|uipment. Ad- 
dition to the stage will provide 28 
motion picture set locations. 

More than 60 |i<>r cent of last 
vears production was in natural 
color: the current iiercentagc is 70 
per cent. Alexander said 6..50<l,(MMt 
feet of color film slock was proc- 
essed in 1950. Forty per cent of all 
Alexander service was in manufai-- 
lurer-dealer productions. 

Pictures Detroit Moves Studios 

♦ I'll Tims l)i iiiiiii, Im.. produi- 
tion ccmipany headed by Lorin C. 
Collins, is now located in new 
studios at 9,S8 24th St.. Detroit. 
Mich. Bichard Naumatm has been 
ajipointed \ ici' pre>idi-nl. 



A SCRIPT SERVICE 




Specializing in a creative 
approach to motion pictures. Production-wise 
shooting scripts and narrations on which spon- 
sors and producers can depend. 

.SID AIM. I. — s( in r IS 

1830 JEFFERSON PLACE, N W ■ WASHINGTON 6. D C ■ NATIONAL 1034 




VARIABLE SPEED MOTOR 

with TACHOMETER 



for 

CINE SPECIAL CAMERA 
AND MAURER CAMERA 

• Its V. universal motor-ac-oc 

• VARIABLE SPEED 8-64 FRAMES 

• SEPARATE BASE FOR CINE SPECIAL 

• ADAPTER FOR MAURER CAMERA 

Interchangrable Motors: 
12 Voll DC variable Speed 8-64 

Framei. 
115 Voll AC 60 Cycle. Synchronoui 

Motor, Single Phote. 
220 Voll AC 60 Cycle, 3 Phaie, Syn- 

chronous Motor, 




intmalton M«i»r$ ft Ci»« Sf rc im t , Ummrrr 
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FUmo C«Mrr«j. Tim* t-mptt F.q%ipm€mt. 



NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT.iNC, 



20 West 22nd Street 



New York 10. N. Y. 



SLASH TikfyudtbitCMti 



Each lime \t)U retake a M>und track, film priKluctiDn 

coses go up. The waste of film stock and the time delay 

for prtKCSsing increase operating costs immeasurably. 

You vliminjtt these extra costs with 

the Fairchild PKISYNC Tape Re- ^^_^__, 

corder. Play back the sound at once ^^^^^ jhJLi 

. . . check it . . . erase the track . . . ^^ 

retake the sound before the talent. ^H ■ ■ " 

the set ttn<i crtu art- (IhhitnJtJ. 



Now Use PIC-SYNC Tape Recorders 
For All Original Sound Tracks 

Fairchild^ dcvdopmcni of HU-SYNC 
makc^ ptJwiSIc the use of incxpcnsi\c ' i" 
tape and (Ci\cs ><ui thcM: hcnchtx. 

# V4 " tap* cotit 80** Ivtt than 16mm mog- 
rwlk film. 

# */«" top* r«qwir*t 50 X l*tt ilerog* tpoc* 
9 V4" tap* it vatior lo hondl* 

# V4" lop* o«iwr«t mo(» intimol* contoti with 
til* h»ad» 

# '4" lap* hot mof« unifofm cootioQ I*** 
omplKud* flutlvr 

# '4" lap* vliminat*t row^ttnvtt of ton<> 
<Owt«d by tprOilirT dnvc 



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1J4TH STMn AND 7TM AVtNUt 
WHITESTONE. N. V. 







N I M II K R I • \ n I, I M K \ 1 • I '» :. 1 



3> 




BUSINESS SCREEN EXECUTIVE 



Al.llKKT S. IIOWKLL 

Death Takes Pioneer Inventor 
and Founder of Bell & Howell 

♦ The death of Albert S. Howell, 
71, founder and chairman of the 
Bell \ Houkll Company, closes 
one of the most significant chapters 
in the hi^^tory of the motion picture. 
Death came January -i at the Ravens- 
wood hospital in Chicago after a 
brief illness. 

.\n enpineerinp project had kept 
him in contact with the business 
after olTicial retirement in 19-10, as 
had his appointment to chairman- 
ship of the board in 1949. 

A complete listing of the contri- 
butions of the pioneer-inventor to 
the motion picture industry would 
be a long record indeed. To three 
of his inventions are generally 
credited the standardization on the 
35mm width film and the rapid ad- 
vancement out of the flicker-and- 
jump era of the nickelodeon. These 
were the Bell & Howell film perfora- 
tor, the continuous printer, and the 
standard camera. 

The Kinodrome 3.Smm motion 
picture projector was one of the in- 
ventor's first patents. It became the 
first standard projector. 

His continuous printer, which put 
an end to the frame by frame hand- 
printing of film, wa?- de\eloped in 
1911. 

Since those earl\ iieginnings the 
history of the Hell & Howell Com- 
pany has been a succession of im- 
provements in various fields of 
equipment for the film industry. 

Among the many honors accorde<l 
Albert S. Howell in a lifetime of 
achievements, outstanding were the 
awarding of ihe Welherill Medal of 
the Franklin ln«lilule and life 
niembi-rship in the American Society 
of Ciiiematographers, which in- 
scribed his name in gold letters be- 
side those of the only two others 
thus honored: Thomas A. Exlison 
and George Eastman. 

Mr. Howell, born April 17. 1879. 
at West Branch. Mich., was at 16 an 



apprentice of the Miehie Printing 
I'ress CompaiiN, atleniiiiig high 
school at night and continuing in 
night i-lasses at Illinois I then Ar- 
mour I Institute of Technology. 

Siirxi\iiig arc his wife. Nora L. 
HdwcII: ;i brother, and three sons. 

Telefilm Signs Gen. Roberts 

♦ HiiicADiEK General James T. 
KoHKKTS is in Washington. I). C. 
setting up lieaii<|uarters as special 
rcpresenUitise of Tki.EKILM. Inc.. 
of lIoll\uoo(l. General Hoberts. 
commanding ollicer of the l.'ith 
Armored Division and a veteran of 
the Battle of the Bulge, is at thi' 
\rmv-Nav\ Club in the capital. 

Ross Roy Promotes Shaul 

♦ William \'. ."shall is now copy 
chief for all sales, service and in- 



dustrial training materials produced 
bv Koss Kov, Inc., following a di- 
vision of the Detroit agency's copy 
department into training and ad- 
vertising groups, due to the prow 
ing volume of training work. Shaul 
had been directing service training 
activities. 

Schubert Heads Film Division for 
Farm Bureau Insurance Companies 

♦ Ernest Schubert, named man- 
ager of the film division of the 
F.ARM Bureau Insurance Compa- 
nies of Columbus, Ohio, brings to 
the organization the experience of 
a decade as a professional photog- 
rapher, chief photographer of the 
l.ustron Corporation and earlier as- 
sociation with the House of Por- 
traits in Columbus. 





Jam Handy Notes Staff Changes: 

♦ Charles Bell has been trans- 
ferred to the New York office of the 
Jam Hamjv Oki.anization to be of- 
fice manager for internal work. 
With Jam Handy for ten years. Bell 
was printed materials supervisor in 
the siidefilm department at the De- 
troit home office. 

♦ Paul Rosenau, who was assist- 
ant sales manager of Leaf Brands. 
inc.. and the American Chicle Com- 
pany, has joined the sales and con- 
tact staff of the Jam Handy Or- 
ganization. 

♦ David C. Giilis, now representing 
the sales and contact staff of the 
Jam Handy Organization in tli<- 
.Michigan area, was formerly prn 
motion manager of the Howar 
Johnson restaurant chain. 

Foreign Language Film Service 

♦ Marki i)K I.vka, 20-72 2Tii 
Street, Long Island City, has un- 
dertaken a new service for indus- 
trial film producers. 

De Lara, chief announcer on 
W WRL's AS hours a week Spanish 
language program and featured 
Spanish announcer at the Alexander 
Film Company and the L'. S. State 
Department Motion Picture Divi- 
sion, now offers complete copy 
writing, translation and narration 
service for film producers, in Span- 
ish, French and Italian. 

Crawley Adds Five to Staff 

♦ \'i\r added to the staff of CraW- 

i.KV Films. Ltd.. of Ottawa and 
Tiiroiito. are the following: John 
Mavted. art director, formerly art 
(lireclor of the Russell T. Kelley. 
Ltd.. agenc) : Kenneth Gee. art de- 
fiartment: Ross McConnell, anima- 
tion cameraman: Monroe Scott, an 
assistant produier: and John Har- 
ris, production staff. 

President of GBF Resigns 

♦ Wii.i.iwi \ \N I'UKAi. has n- 
sipned as president of General 
Business Films. Inc. 



40 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Nkw Bell & Howkll Rochester Film I'lant recently opened covers 
it-acre site; specializes in microfilm to supply national demand for this field. 



Bell & Howell Expands Defense 

♦ The Bell & Howell Company, 
with military conlrarls already ex- 
■ ci-ilinp se\pn iiiillioii dollars and 
»ilh inurt' ill ncgoliation. showed 
cariiinjis in 19S0 second only to the 
1 1 19l« record of $3,018,277 at 83.67 
.1 ronmion share, according to I'resi- 
iPKNT CnARi.ES H. Percy. 

Outlook for continued output for 
ei\ilian supply for the first half of 
this year is "fair." Mr. Percy said, 
though denuind for |)hotii>ira|)hic 
apparatus will exceed supply and 
government orders probably will en- 
gage more of the production capac- 
ity as the year advances. I nder fro\- 



In New York It's 

Rll n V EDITORIAL 
U D I SERVICE, INC. 

Comp/ete film tdltorlal fatllllles 

for Motion Picture A Tefevlsfon 

Production 

SOINDPROOF AIR-CoNDITIONEI) 

Private Editing Rooms 
Modern Eqiipment For 

EvTRY Technical Reqcire- 
ment - - 3.'i 4 Ifimm 

Rentals By Day, Week or Month 
ALL NEW MOVIOLA EQUIPMENT 

Fquipment Available for 
Off The Premise Rentals 

72<>— Till Ave, N.Y. al 49ih Si. 
Tel.: rirrlr S-Sfi 10 



You can buy titles for less than 
KNIGHT QUALITY sells for. but 
you cannot get greater value at 
any price. That s why our titles 
cost less in the long run. 

THE KNIGHT STUDIO 

341 E. Ohio Street. Chicago II. Illinois 



Output; Opens Microfilm Plant 

ernment contracts that began coming 
in l<> months ago. the conipanv is 
|iro\ idiiif; equipment for ground mo- 
liiin picture and air reconnaisance 
work and gunfire control. 

Formal opening of the company's 
microfilm plant at Rochester, .\. Y., 
which Mr. Percy attended, paves the 
way for a multi-million dollar busi- 
ness in a few \ears at that center, he 
said. Plans call for limiting produc- 
tion there to microfilm, though the 
plant is adaptable for making other 
photogra|)hic materials, he added. 
He called the Rochester project a 
|>art of the company's plan to add 
products in steady demand. Invest- 
ment at Rochester is more than 
■^l..i(M).(KM). The building was 
bought for S32.5,(KK). 

Manufacture of equipment for 
microfilm recording of documents 
started afliT Mr. Percy l)ecame 
li. \ H. president al 2"'. two \ears 
ago. 1 he inicrolilm will be distrib- 
uted by the Burroughs Adding Ma- 
chine Company and other dealers, 
he said. Burroughs is distributing 
the macliines that make the photo- 
graphic re-ords on the microfilm. 

At the formal o()ening on Janu- 
ary 22. I'resident IVrcv showed his 
guests the plant via color slidefilins, 
in lieu of a personal lour. He ex- 
plaiiii-d that dust carried on cloth- 
ing could <nu.s«' heavy damage to 
highlv .sensitized film. 

The group of building.H is on a 
H-acre site. One is e(|uip)M-d for 
all pha.'ws of film manufacluring. 
including emulsion making, coal- 
ing, slitting and |M-rforating. .An- 
other is a chemical rewan-h lab 
oratorN. with half the working 
space in almost total darkness for 
liandling light sensilixe eniulsion->. 
Developing solutions. ti\er<i and dis- 
tilled water are pi|)«'<l throughout 
the plant. Tem|M-raturr and humid- 
ilv are uniler constatil control. 
Much of the eipiipmeiil was built 
to Hell ^ Howell s|M-ciricalions. 



frdtecUfresem 

YOUR FILM 



EVKRY film u»cr nc«<Js efficient 
storaft*^ 'nd filing space. Ncumadc't 
pratiual. tpnially (ic-tif(nc<l Mix\ 
labincis arc Fireproof, l)u»c proof, 
and tlumidificd. affording you 
maximum protection for your film. 
Alt models tome in olive-grey 
enamel with polished chrome han- 
dler and hinges. 

Model MM-1 19-(ll'u Irolcd) Film filing 
cobinet. Individuol reel indes plwt 
mailer index; door hot o lo<k o\ well 
Of Ihree poini latching device. 70" high. 
30" wide, 16" deep. CAPACITY 40 - 
400 II. reeli; 20 - 800 ti. reeli. 20 - 
1200 It. reelt: 20 - 1600 It. reelt; 100 
filmttrip cons. Utility drawer in base. 



Over Fifty .Models to Choose From, but Neumade engineers 
are available without obligation to assist you with your 
p.irtituiar rctiuircnienis when netc-s^.ir\ 

Write today for Free fully illustrated Catalog. Depl. 102C 
All ProUuits lactory Gujrjtittcd 



1916 



TRAOC )W4Ani< 



EkwrmnR 



PRODUCTS CORP 
330 W. 42nd St., New York 18, N. Y. 



A True One-Man Laboratory 

DEVELOP YOUR OWN NEGATIVES 

with BRIDGAMATIC Self Contained Processor 




BXIOCAHATIC JR 
Jlo HI coner... 



Ii': 



M175 .«ct«) 



Completely automatic 16nun oi 
16 3Smm combination mcxleU. Fof 
TV ttatioiu. imall laba.. Indus- 
trial producer!. lucto-ltlmet*. The 
|r Model takei les« than 12 feet 
•quate Hoot apace. 

Develop and dry ready lot print- 
ing ot piolecttng at hourly tale 
powlive 4S0 it.. negaUve 180 <t. 
Exclusive overdrive prevents Itlm 
bieekage. acxalchea. static maiks 
ot any hsnn whatsoevei to lilm 
being pro c eeeed. 



cprp|«| I NiW Poriible Ciierj Dolli «ilh i«o siiiel seits. 
orLUIHL. worth S350 0»l) i le» iMhis jnte. S242.50 



ACINTS FOR: Acme Animation • Blue Seal Recorden • Depua Prtalan • 
Feailess Dollies • Aurlcon 16mm line ■ Hallen Recorders • Magnecotdets • 
Smith VIewllndeis • Colottian Liles • Bodde Screens • Hollywood Prlnlets 
* Zoomat Cino Balowstar tens * Kinevox Magnetic Hc*ct?tdert * Mole Ricfasid- 
son Ughls MANT ITIMS AVAIIASU ON TIMI PAYMINTS. 

"Tile Oepextmenl Store o/ the Mofioa Plctiue lodiutry" 

S.O.S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP. 

Oepf M, 602 WEST SJnd STREET. NEW YORK 19 



N I \l It K H 1 



\ ( > I I M K I 2 • I <> i I 



41 



Magnetic Recording of SouncJ 
and Pix Potential of Future 

♦ With I'aruinounI J'ictures lead- 
ill}; llif purade, in iiiagnetic tajM- 
rcitirdiiif; nf snunil. prcHliclitins of 
the dalf <if application of ihr new 
system to recording image*) as well 
as sound vary from six months to 
two years. 

Holand (fillett. vice president of 
the Young & Kuhicani a<l\ertising 
agency and producer of 77i<' In- 
tatlers. wiinier of an Academy 
Award, says the new reproduction 
of images will he here hv July. 
Loren I.. Ryder, chief of the sounil 
department of Paramount, doulits 
that the evperimental stage will he 
passed within two years. 

The largest problem, according 
to an article in FortI'nk Maga- 
zi.VK. is to carry four million bits 
of information a secoml. compared 
to the l.S.tMHI for sound production 
aloiic. 

Gillett sees saying of time, equip- 
ment, money and procedure when 
the changeoyer is effected, lie adds 
that magnetic tape recording be- 
cause of the fidelity achieved, will 
be especially important to televi- 
sion, eliminating the need of kine- 
s<'oped material and the coaxial 
cable which requires that an H p.m. 
New York show go on the air three 
hours earlier in California. 

The producer p<jinted out these 
additional advantages: magnetic 
tape recortling can be played back 
immediately, rehearsal time is re- 
duced. "nufTs" can be eliminated 
easily, and portable sound units on 
location can be moved along with 
the cameras. 

Copper Coot of Carbon Trims 
Thinned After U. S. Directive 

• Thickness of the cop|K'r coat of 
two of the most popular projection 
carbon trims is being reduced by 
the .National Cakbo.v Division of 
the Union Carbide and Carbon 
Corporation, to cooperate with the 
Government's Order N. P. ,\. M-12 
calling for reduced use of copper 
for mm-military needs. 

The new products will be known 
a.H "Victory" Carbons, as was the 
ca.s*' in World War II. and will be 
identified by white ink showing the 
trade-mark and the rive-aiiip<-re re- 
iluction in the maximum current 
rating to 65 amperes on the 8nmi- 
imm trim and 45 amperes on the 
7mm-6mm trim. The "Victory" la- 
bel and the reduction will l»c shown 
on the unit package and the 5-unit 
ease. 

Kmphasizing that the supply of 
proj«-lor carbons will be adequate, 
the company notes that if a "Vic- 
tory" carbon i.s paired with one of 
heavier cop|KT coat a slight adjust- 



The Latest in Audio-Visual Equipment and Accessories 



ment in rate of feed ru:u be re- 
quired to compensate for the change 
in burning ratio, and that the maxi- 
mum current marked on the "Vic- 
ti>r\" carbon iiiiist not be exceeded. 

Kodok Center Will Emphasize 
Training of New Personnel 

♦ Training of new personnel will 
be emphasized, because of the iii- 
teriiational situation, at conferences 
this year at the Kastman Koiixk 
Company's sales training center in 
Rochester. N. Y. Nine conferences 
already have been scheduled for 
the first half of 1951. 

Photographic dealers from all 
.sections were represented by the 
355 sales |)ersonnel who attended 
meetings last year. Fourteen groups 



were trained at len-dav conferences. 
There was an additional three-dav 
gathering for Kodak wholesalers 
and a four-day meeting for chain 
druggists. 

Nine hundred persons lia\e been 
trained since the course <ipened in 
mid-1948, said Howard K. I'albfu.s. 
director of the center. Subjects in- 
clude latest techniques in |)hoto- 
graphic selling, new Kodak prod- 
ucts and operations of the company. 

New Playback Machine Ready 

* A transcription playback ma- 
chine for AC and DC operation is 
being introduced by the AliDlo- 
Mastkr Coiii'ORATiON. An automa- 
tic relay switchboard is iMciir|)oratcd 
in the new equipment. 




Send ^1 FREE 

Do-lile Cryslol-Bcoded 
icreen fabric and copy of 
helpful brochure "Plonning 
for Effective Projection" 



When you put on your showing of 
business films — inotion pictures, slides 
or filmstrips — do the job right — use a 

DA-LITE 

CRYSTAL-BEADEP 
SCREEN 

Its millions of tiny cryslal beads give 
your pictures theatre-i|ualily brilliance 
and sharpness . . . (about 200*^^ to 
.300"^; brighter than on a wall, sheet or 
makeshift screen). The grealiT light 
reflective iniality of tlu- Dal.itc ("ryslal 
Beaded surface brings out all the de- 
tails and line gradations of lone and 
color that the camera has captured. 

Your supplier has Da-Lite Screens in 
sizes and styles for every need. Ask for 
a denion>traliiin. 

Ihe Screem EXPERIENCE Built 
— fomoos for quality since 1909 



k k. 



kklA 



AJj. 






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DA-LITE SCREEN COMPANY, INC. 



1701 N. Puloilii Rood • Chicago 39, lllinoll 

I'll., ,■ scn>i IKM- s.imnlc of Da-l.itc CryMal-Bcidcd j 
cell fabric anil your brochure "i'lanning for KiTcc- 1 
Mvc projection." | 

Snmr I 

Virm Samt . ! 

.ittJreti I 

Ciiy 





Zone 



Slalt 



Till' lininilii'rfit'r Film Fiji- 

Brumberger Introduces New 
Film File, Housing and Cabinet 

♦ .New from the Hl( I M B K l((. KR 
CoMi'ANV is the .No. 1032 portable 
all-steel file for filmstrips or 35mm 
negatives, for both amateur and 
professional. .Made of heavy gauge 
steel, spot-welded, this Brumberger 
filmstrip file accommodates 32 film- 
strip cans in individually numbered 
compartments, and an index canl 
is furnished with each file. The 
handle and snap catches are strong- 
ly made. The file, finished in plati- 
num grey wrinkle enamel, retails at 
.S2.95. 

The No. 1092 housing, accom- 
modating six No. 1032 files and 
other Brumberger 2" x 2" files, is 
a convenient storage unit. The 
housing sells at S9.95. 

.•\lso introduced is the No. 109.S 
cabinet, with six steel drawers, eaili 
holding 32 filmstrip cans (a total 
of 192 cans I in a compact unit. 
The complete cabinet, in platinum 
grev wrinkle enamel, retails for 
S24.95. 

For Brumberger's new catalog 
write the Brumberger Company, 34 
Thirty-fourth St.. Brooklyn 32, 

New Eastman Linagraph Film 

♦ A new kind of him that penniL- 
|)i(tiire-taking IT.OOO feet under- 
ground at temperatures of 325 
Fahrenheit is being made for oil 
well drillers by East.man Kodak 

('OMI'ANY. 

Kodak Linagraph Drift Survev 
Film is the new product, available 
in both lOinin and 3.5mm. It is used 
in a standard clinometer or drift 
survey camera to record readings 
of drift meters and other devices to 
show angle and direction of drilling. 
Technicians thus can measure the 
"off \erlical" status at any depth or 
chart the course of the well to the 
oil bearing sand. 

The him resists the increasingly 
higher temperatures encountered as 
the apparatus goes farther down. 
The pridilem of humidity is met by 
packing the Linagraph film in vac- 
uum-sealed packages o|>ened just 
before the camera is lowered. Dry- 
ness during exposure is aided by a 
desiccating agent in the camera. 



42 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



RCA Engineering Products 
Unit Promotes T. A. Smith 

♦ TiiKODORK A. Smith, nainod as- 
sistant general manager of the RCA 
Encinkkhi.ng Fkodlcts Dkpart- 
MENT, takes over the duties of W. 
Walter V( alts, vice president anil 
general manager <>f llie de[)arlment. 
now serving on leave of ahsenie 
with Maj. Gen. William H. Harri- 
son, Defense Production Adminis- 
trator. Smith has headed sales ac- 
tivities of the de|iarlmenl for five 
years. 

A. R. Hopkins is now general 
sales manager of the deparlment: 
Barton Krkitzkr general |)rod- 
uct manager. The announcemenls 
were made by L. W. Teegarden. 
RCA vice president in charge of 
technical products of the RCA Vic- 
tor Division. 

Smith constructed RCA's pioneer 
television transmitting station. 
W2XBS. New York, now known as 
WM5T. That was in 1928. three 
years after he had joined RCA's 
Technical and Test Laboratories on 
graduation from Stevens Institute 
of TechnologN . In I'XM) he became 
eastern district sales manager for 
broadcast equipment and in 193!! 
he was assigned to the Camden 
headquarters. 

Hopkins, now in charge of sales 
adminis'.ration. advertising and pro- 
motion of the department's varied 
products, was manager of broadcast 
and conununicalions equifiment 
sales. He is a graduate of Ohio 
State I niversity. 

Kreutzer headed sales activities 
of theatre, film recording, sound and 
visual products before the new ap- 
pointment. On graduation from the 
Brooklyn Polytechnic Instituti- he 
joined RCA at the Van Cortlant 
Park laboratories, was assigned to 



Camden in 1933 and a year later 
was named manager of the RCA 
Film Recording Slu<lios in .New 
^ ork. In I'XM he was made man- 
ager of the <'i>mpan\'s Hollvwood 
recordiiif; studios and in 1943 man- 
ager of the Photophone Division, at 
Camden, handling theatre and film 
recording sales. 



Sales Prescription Presented 
At Da-Lite Screen Staff Meeting 

♦ Aggressive sales planning, adver- 
tising, window displavs and point- 
of-purchase selling are the four in- 
gredients of the prescription for 
successful selling advanced bv 
Mkki.k Paintkk. in charge of the 
program of advertising and sales 
promotion of the Da-Lite Screen 
CoMi'ANY. 1m:.. of Chicago, at the 
annual sales meeting. 

Gii.iiKKT Heck, sales manager, 
oullinod the overall sales and or- 
ganization policies for 1951, in 
terms of availabilitv of materials 
and production facilities. 

Effective planning, said Painter, 
must be predicated on accurate 
market analysis, knowledge of 
|>r<iduct and appraisal of competi- 
tion. He emphasized well-balanced 
ad\ertising programs, consistent 
schedules and lonvincing copv, also 
e)e-com|)elling displavs and offers 
that stimulate action. K.ssential to 
selling, he said, are arrangement 
of menhandise to stop IralTic. tle- 
monslrative displavs. practical sales 
aids and informed personnel. 

Also participating in the meet- 
ing were presiilent Chester Cooley, 
vice-president Howard Chiislensen. 
assistant sales manager Rene F. 
(iardner, anil Dave Mulcrone. Rob 
Kuschnick and .Murra\ Merson of 
the sales department. 



Da-lite Sale.s Conventioneers (I. to r.) were Dave Mulcrone, Merle 
I'ainler. Gil Heck, president Chester Cooley, fice-presulent Howard Chris- 
tensrii. Rene Gardner. Hob Koschnick. and Murray Merson. 




NIW roiK, N. T. 

^••r)«ii Film Proc. Corp. 

D« LuMv lobotoierivi 

folh« Loboralorisi 

Mo>l«lob FIliK Labi. 

Ford*! Film lobl. 

Cinvqw* Colorflim lobi. 

FT. lEf, N. J. 

Coniolldoled Film Indt. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

Boon, l>«. 

TOIONTO. ONT. 

P*arl«i, lobO'Qlori*! 



ClfVELANO, O 

Motion Picfuro Prodt. 

DArTON. o. 

WngM-Pollarion A. F. B. 

OITIOIT, MICH. 
Jom Handy Organiiolion 

CHICAGO, III. 

Chicago Film lab. 

Crotcant Film Labi. 

Wilding Picturo Predt. 

Idoal Picturoi Corp. 

OAK rAlK, III. 
Atlat Film Corp. 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Roid H. Roy Film Irtdl. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Tho Calvin Compony 




ATLANTA. 

Oiitribulor 1 



CA. 

Croup 



DALLAS, TtXAS 

Soulhwoil Soundfllmt 



HOLLYWOOO. CALIF. 

Peorloit Film Proc. Corp. 

Acmo Film Labi. 

Columbia Picture* Lob. 

Contolidatod Film Indl. 

Path* loborotoriot 

T«l«f!lm. Inc. 

BUIBANK, CALIF 

Cinocolor Corporation 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

W E. Hockoy 

PORTIANO. ORE. 

Soever » Inc 



'to start your film 
off right — 

to keep it right... 
longer — 

always specify 



/i 



EERLESS 

FILM TREATMENT" 



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BRUSSELS. BELGIUM 

ROME. ITALY 

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tERLESS CORPORATION 

16S WEST 46TH STREET, NEW YORK 19. N. T. 
959 SEWARD STREET, HOUYWOOO 21. CAUF. 



PROTECT A. V. EQUIPMENT— GUARD VALUABLE FILMS! 



• Your present audio-visual e<|uip- 
mcnt anil current film prodiictimi^ 
iirc worth more tixlay than ever 
iH'forc. Protoit Ixilli ami assure 
hcttrr showmanship through u.se of 
the graphic, complfti- Xmli.. \i,m il 



Projectionist's Handt>ook. Con- 
tains stcp-hy-stcp lessons oji c<|uip- 
nicnt operation. kimkI showmanship, 
film care. etc. Only $1.00 per copy, 

T...^*|L-Ii.l ( Ir./.-r t.,.t.,\ •r..,„ 



AUDIO-VISUAL PROJECTIONIST S HANDBOOK 

150 East Superior Street — Chicago 1 I, Illinois 



SALES • SERVICE • REIVTALS 

35 mm. • 16 mm. 

CAllIERAS*lllOVIOLAS«DOLLYS 

CompUu Um* of Eqtiipmtni for Produrtiom ApmiUbU for RtmuU 

Mitchell: Standard - Hi-Speed - NC - BNC - 16 mm. 

Bell & Howell: Standard - Shif tover • Eyemos 

MiUtrer: 16 mm. Cameras 

Moviola: Editing Machines • Synchronizers 

SOCIALISTS IN ALL TYPIS Of CAMERA MPAIR WOUIC. LINSU MOUNTID 



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NUMBER I • \ O I I M K I : • I 'i .•; I 



43 



Peace and Food Are Themes 
Of Minneapolis-Moline Films 
♦ Iwii l'*51 ciilDr tilin>. spiiiisnrcd 

!•> lllf MlNMAI'Ol.lsMol.lNK (lllM 

I'ANY iif Miiiiii-apolis. Minn., and 
taking on a s|ie('ial tiMicliiii'ss Ix'- 
(-aust* iif llie roilfil intcrnatixnal 
waliTs and conse(|ui'nt rnipliasis on 
prcjiarednrss pruducliun of food- 
stuffs, are now being shown li\ MM 
repri-si-nlativos in (-oinniunilv Dral- 
er HaN projiranis from roast to 
coast. 

A travelog. Haii-ns of I'eace. 
takes the audience to countries in 
Kurope where the word peace for 
centuries has meant preciseK that, 
not the definition-juggling any 
things of today's despots. Visited 
are the scenic <'onununities of An- 
dorra in the mountains bridging 
Spain and France. San Marino in 
northeast Italy. Vatican City with 
its Holv Year pilgrims. OI)crani- 
niergau and its I'assion Play, agri- 
cultural Switzerland, and independ- 
ent little Liechtenstein adjoining 
Austria. 

Importance of the soil to man 
and nation is the theme of The Soil 
Is Good, a plea for conservation 
and an exposition of modern ma- 
(hinerv's function in helping the 
farmer save the soil, increase yield 
and reduce cost of production. 

Shown also at the Dealer Dav 
programs is a short color travelog. 
CaMles, Colli and Contentment, a 
tour of castles and Kriesland of 
llolstein-f riesian cattle fame. 

.Advertising kits furnished to 
dealers contain color posters, invita- 
tion mailers, news releases, tickets 
and newspaper aii mats. 

Darrei. Brady Productions of 
Holly W(io<l made Havens oj I'eace. 
and American Film and Telf.vad 
Company of St. Paul produced The 
Soil Is Good. 

The Klliott Film Company of 
Minneapidis handles distriliutirm of 
\Iinnea|iolis-Miiline films, for whi<li 
1.2IH1 rei]ue>ts were received in two 
months last fall. After dealers have 
completed their rounds of showings, 
the films are released to schools and 
civic grou|>s. 

Minneapolis-Moline, which was 
an early us«-r of industrial <-olor- 
and-sounil films. re|eas<-d This llrri- 
liijie of Ours and Reasons for thr 
Seasons two years ago. and last year 
brought out An .American Journe'i 
ahd If ealher Ifhys. 

The DITice of International In- 
formation of the r. S. Department 
of Slate choM- Reasons for the .Sea- 
sons for international showings a- 
a representative American film that 
explains why there are varvinj.' 
seasons and how modern machine^ 
help farmers meet the resultant 
problems. 



FILMS IMIOMOTE BEITEH LIVING 



Lumberman's Association Film 
Plays Up Woods for the Home 

♦ >|ionsored by the W EsT CiiiASI 
1,1 mberman's Ass()i;iatI(IN is a new 
10 mm. sound-color exposition of 
W est Coast lumber manufacture and 
use. Besides logging operations in 
the Far Northwest, Lumber for 
Homes shows sawmills at work and 
explains the grading of lumber for 
specific purposes of construction 
and economy. 

For free loan (except transporta- 
tion one way I address the West 
Coast Luniberman's Associatinn. 
1110 S. W. Morrison St., Portland 
5, Ore. 

Films Help Sugar Company 
Celebrate Diamond Jubilee 

♦ Audio-visual inediiiiiis played a 
double-barreled role in the diamond 
jubilee celebration of the W'aii.lki; 
SrcAR Company, Maui. Hawaii. 
F'our hundred of the .5.50 employes 



saw themselves at work in a prc-sen- 
latioii of ]')(i cidor slidcfilrns. afl<-r 
which came Mills H lire Is Rolliufi, 
employe relations cidor motion pic- 
ture prepared by the Hawaiian 
Sii;ar Planters Association. In 
<harge were AKin .Silva. industrial 
relations supervisor of the company, 
and Hoy J. I^flingwell, public rela- 
tions director of the association. 

Milk Producer and Dealer Spill 
Cost of Public Relations Film 

♦ Product producer and dealer di- 
vide the cost of promotion for sales 
at the retail level in presenting a 
new sound and color film. .Some- 
tkinp to Crow About. The project, 
which reflects recognition of the 
producers share of responsibility 
in advertising outlay for retail sell- 
ing of his product, is a cooperative 
move of New Jersev dairymen and 
dealers to increase milk .sales. 

The Raritan Valley Farms 
Producers Association gets its 




Multiple Cameras Shoot 
Dormeyer Corp. Films 







ryHji^r^. 



W«*d be pleoted to icreen 
ftome of our lotest produc- 
tion > for you- No obi) got ion. 



NCW YORK • CHICAGO 
HOLLYWOOD 



SLIDEFILMS • MOTION PICTURES 
TELEVISION COMMERCIALS 



fiinds from a voluntary dairyman] 
ilii-ckoff system, and the Raritan| 
Valley Farms, retail company atj 
Somerville. matches the amount) 
thus rai.sed by the a.ssociation. 

The fund is to be used on several 
m(;dia. including radio, but the mo- 
tion picture is the chief investment. 

The film was made by F'ilm- 
smitbs. Inc.. New Brunswick. N. J. 

In the 2(l-ininute subject, treated 
broadly for general appeal to pu- 
pils and adults, a Broadway actor 
provides the voice for a rooster- 
narrator that comments cynically 
al first but changes his tune as 
llic milk production story, farm to 
home, is told. 

Perfex Corporation Sales Film 
Builds Better Customer Relations 

♦ The seller and tin- buyer share 
the emphasis in a sound and color 
slidefilni of heating controls spon- 
sored by the Perfex Corporation 
of Milwaukee. Wis., and produced 
by the Atlas Film Corporation. 

In People Are Our Business Per- 
fex tells the story behind the com- 
pany, which supplies controls for 
oil burners, gas. electric and coal 
heating in the home and industry. 

Household Finance Slidefilm 
Features "Key to Better Living" 

♦ How the Jennings family learned 
to lialaiice the budget is the story of 
) our Key to Better Living, slidefilni 
produced for Household Finance 
Corporation by Sarra, Inc. The 
company's booklet, "Money Man- 
agement. Your Budget," is intro- 
duced. 

This latest film in Households 
liliMstrip lectures is expected by the 
company to be shown at least 1,500 
times this year. There is a separate 
version for Canada. 

Pressure Cooker Film Theme 

* How to save time, food and nutri- 
tive values bv |)ressure cooking is 
tile theme of a 22-minute. Ifmim 
sound-color film. Food for Thought. 
sponsored by the Pressure Cook- 
i\(; Institute and available on free 
loan from Association Films. Spring 
Bvington and a Hcdlywood cast give 
the demonstration. Dudley Picture 
Corporation produced the subject. 

Farm Remodeling Is Theme 

* Iteiiiodi'liiig of farm homes is the 
tlicnie of l/v Father's House, pro- 
duced by George Carillon. Inc.. for 
the r. S. Gypsum Company. The 
.S2-iMinute color film expounds the 
theme that modernizing farmhouses 
will help keep sons and daughters 
from moving into the city. In pro- 
duction the industrial picture is 
triMted as a straight dramatic 
sireenplay. 



44 



It I > I N K S S SCREEN M A r, .^ Z I N E 



SAVE YOUR FILMS 



Don't let the scratch disease rot away 
your message. Don't try to cure scratches; 
prevent them at their source with BUFIT 
the amazing new automatic scratch in- 
surance. BUFIT's heavy film base is im- 
pregnated with the exclusive new L'Y- 
CRON burnishing compound. When used 
as trailer or leader. BUFIT cleans where 
it goes and goes where its needed. It trail- 
blazes an immaculate path for your soft, 
tender emulsions. Relax, eliminate those 
ineffective presentations of your valuable 
prints. BUFIT removes emulsion pile-up. 
grit and dirt with no skill or effort required 
from the projectionist. 

Here are a few of the many users of 
BUFIT. Join them now on the film saving 
bandwagon. 

Bell U Howell U. S. Dept of Sute 

Telenews Prods., Inc. The Jam Handy Org. 
U. S. Signal Corps. Iowa State College 
Consolidated-Vultee Aircraft Corporation 
Los Angeles County Board of Education 

Don't delay. Act today. The BUFIT way 
is the safe way. 16mm 50-foot TRIAL kit 
only $4.50. specify double or single per- 
foration. 8mm and 35mm also available. 
Bulk price for 16mm is 9c per foot. Lib- 
eral discounts on quantity purchases. 

ORDER YOUR TRIAL KIT NOW 



Film lights Discrimiiialion 



BUFIT 



6009 West Pico Blvd., 
Los Angeles 35, Calif. 



35MM COLOR 
THEATER PRINTS 

ENLARGED FROM 

16MM COLOR ORIGINALS 



16MM KODACHROME PRINTING MASTERS 
WITH EFFECTS INCLUDED 



35MM B&W NEGATIVES EN- 
LARGED FROM U,MM ORIGINALS 



FOR TV 

35MM B&W OR COLOR FILMS 

REDUCED TO 1 6MM 

FOR TELEVISION RELEASE 



FILMEFFECTS 

OF HOLLYWOOD 

I IS3 N. Highland Avi<., HollYwood 3S, Calif. 
HO 9-5800 



SPECIAL EFFECTS 

Dissolves • Montages • Wipiv • F.i'l>'< 

Zooms • Superimposures • Sp*'f<l Chrtn^'s 

Slide Films Duplicated Opticully 

ExptTimi-ntnl Proi<*cts 



( CONTINUED K K <) M I' A C K THIRTY I 

llirowing open their "inorgues" for seleclicm of 
stills has given the fihn an imprint of authen- 
ticity throughout. Shots from a wide variety 
of business, showing employes of differing 
colors Working edieienlly, side by side, drive 
home the points made by the 19 or more speak- 
ing partitipanls. 

Facts Show It Isn't (foimI itiisiness 

The film ojiens with a Negro girl applying 
for a job at the personnel desk. When the head 
of the company learns a report has been de- 
layed by a shortage of help in the accounting 
department, because Personnel refuses to take 
on Negroes and Jews, the exposition gels under- 
way. Results of a nine months survey of 300 
businesses bv one of the Chamber's nine com- 
mittees are fortified with cumnicnt by f>utstand- 
ing personalities in Illinois industrial, educa- 
tional and religious fields. 

Among points of universal application are 
these: prejudice translated into discrimination 
is dangerous to the economy and holds down 
both production and wages: ability is an indi- 
\i(lual matter, not racial: all men are basically 
alike; persons with inferior complexes are apt 
to make others the scapegoats for their defi- 
ciencies: time and motion studies show equal 
eOiciency among skilled workers of different 
races: one large <i)mpaiiy reported le.^s ab- 
senteeism among Negroes than whites. 

The film closes on the theme that it is up to 
top management to establish a clearcul policy 
that non-discrimination is good Americanism 
and good business practice, proved by busi- 
nesses which successfully have assimilate<l mi- 
nority groups. 

Introduced on the screen are .Negroes of in- 
ternational fame in many activities, ranging 
from world diplomacy to science to concert 
platform. 

Difficult Tbenie K SkillfiilK Done 

While the film lacks the rounding out that 
motion could have provided, the return to the 
central characters is skillfully integralejl to ef- 
fect continuitv. and tactful handling of the 
theme is consistently evidenced. Martha Wood 
of Francisco Films di<l the script ami ri'cnrd- 
ing. Jerome Straus was the photographer ami 
as-sembled the production. 

The 2t prints are available to local Cham- 
bers, other business groups and civic organi- 
zations. While s<-enes are from Illinois com- 
panies and the personalities are for the most 
part Illinoisans, the theme is of general pur- 
port and interest, .\ddress the I'ersonnel and 
I-abor llelations DeparlmenI, Illinois Slate 
Chamber of Commerce, 2t> N. Wacker Drive, 
Chicago (t. III. 

The overall plan of the Kniplo\meiil Oppor- 
tunities F^<lucalional Program of the Chamlwr 
also calls for a series of regional conferences, 
the first Febriiarv 9 at the F'almer House in 
Chicago: a school for key |M-rs<.nnel and indus- 
trial relation" executives, expert cnunsrling 
service and assistance in placing ininorilv group 
employes. HriK-hures defining objectives arc 
provided with the prints. • 



YOUR ATTENTION, PLEASE! 

In line with our 1951 policy of introducing 
new wiuipment to the motion picture and 
television producer, we are proud to pre.sent 
the following: 

CAMART TV CAMERA CAR 
A four wheel dolly light enough to be lifted 
by two men. 27 inch width to go through a 
standard doorway. Boom arm has double 
and triple action balance to support a camera 
weight of 150 pounds and go through a 90 
degree swoop from a low of 26" to a height 
of seven feet. Can be taken apart into three 
sections for transportation in your car. 

CAMART OPTICAL FX UNIT 
Now in rc^ruiur usi- by many TV stations 
and producers. Available in two, three, four, 
five, and six surface prisms. Will reproduce 
multiple images in still or circular motion. 
Adapters for use with 35mm Mitchell 
cameras. 

NEW ZOOM MIKE ROOM 
Telescopes from 7'-j feet to Itj':: feet, with 
automatic counter-balance, directional mike 
control, self-enclosed cables, on roller stand. 

Price: $750.00. F.O.B. C;il. 
Also available with perambulator stand. 

NEW COLORTRAN CONVERTER 
Will boost a 2000 watt studio spotlight to 
the equivalent of 5000 watts of color-bal- 
anced light and draws less than 30 amps. 
Price: $59.50 
ROUND UP YOUR USED EQUIPMENT 
FOR TOUR lEST IfSI TRADE-IN 
VALUES NOW! 
NEW IfSI MART MESSAGE. 
ITS BETTER THAN EVER. 
All 1i-35min Prodiictieii •qvipmcat 
available for rentals. 



THE CAMERA • MART inc. 

70 WEST 4Slh ST 

NEW YORK 19. N Y 

CABLE ADDRESS -CAMER AM ART 

WORLDWIDE SERVICE 



^1 HERE'S THE RIALLY 
'f^lSy VERSATILE VIEWER — 



More Economical, Too! 



VIBSATILI SLID! VIIWIB 

for 35mm lo 2'. slid'-* -^ 



tUJS 




V*'H>i<>*. ow'evioKcaMr c««l«<* •■! UttfM ffW 
]]»»i. lo 31.' ■ J'.' (Uclatflaf »o«l«"). 
Sko»l btiltidnllT .lUMinot*^. •«IO'*«4 *i*«i 
Ihrovth o Ana o«ti(oMf S'OwAd o«d p«lilh«d I***. 
C««p)**« with b«>b. •« off iwlHh VAd 4 *••• 
!•««- All tf**! coiHlfwciieM. lioa< n «l l T ft*<ib«4 
In at*«»4ti«« «i*i ■•.Ahi* •««*«l. 

S:1225 Viewer $5.95 

Um t'WMb*«»*« Sl'tf* 9. it lo' Hl*« a«d tftl* 
»0»>< lto*Ot« •' 'OlwObt* lO^M. M««Ml tK«« U 
ttw«b^««« AH S»Ml $'•*• * - '- ■ - "• ■ ■"• 



wttm im Mff caraioo 



24 Thirty-FoiirHt St.. Ulyn. 32. N. V. 



NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 12 • 1951 



45 



A NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF VISUAL EDUCATION DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 



• roNNKCTiriT • 

Rockui-ll Film X I'rojcc-lioii 

S.T»irf. l!'.2lli^liSl.. liartfor.l .'.. 

Eaolrrn Film I.ihrurios. 148 Grand 
Street, Vt aterbury 5. 

• DISTKICT OF COLUMBIA • 



Jnm Ilaniiy Or<;:iiiizati«>n. Inr.. 

rraM-|uirtati<>n l)lil'i..\\ usliing- 
ton 6. 

Tlie Film Center. 91, t 12th St. 
N.W .. \\ ashirifiloti. 

The ^'aleott-Tavlor Companv. 
Inc., 501 Mills' Bidg.. Washing- 
ton, 6. D. C. 



• MARYLAND • 



Robert L. Davis. P. 0. Box 572, 
Cumberland. 

Howard E. Thompson. Box 204, 
Mt. Airv. 



• MASSACHUSETTS • 



Bailev Film Service, 59 Chandler 
Street, Tel. 4-0214, Worcester 8. 



• NEW HAMPSHIRE • 



A. H. Rice Co., Inc., 78 West Cen- 
tral Street, Manchester. 



• PfEW JERSEY • 

Slidecrafl Co., South Orange, N. J. 

• NEW YORK • 



.'Vssociation Films, Inc., .35 West 
45th Street, New York 19. 

liurhan Pirtures, 79 Allen St., 
Hufl.il... 

Charles J. Ciegcrich, 42-20 Kis- 
■ sena Blvd., Flushing. 

Comprehensive Service Co., 245 
W. 55th St., New York 19. 

Council Films, Inc., 50 N. Main 
St., Homir, N. Y. 

Crawford & Immig, Inc., 265 W. 

14th St., .New York City 11. 



The Jam lianily Orpinization. 
inc.. I77.'> Bniadwuv. Nrw ^ ork. 

Ken Killian Sd. & Vis. Pdls. 
P. O. Box MA Hempstead. N. \. 

Miimill. Film and Camera (^om- 
l.anv. 112-11 I W. Wlh ."^t., New 
York 19. 

Panmiel ("<>.. KM!! .\sloria Blvd.. 
■^iiiilli. l.dii;; l?-lan<i (jlj .'?. 

Jack Patent. 13 East 37th Street, 
New York 16. 

S. O. S. Cinema Suppiv Corp., 

602 W. 52nd St., New York 19. 

Sp'-cializejl Sound Products Co., 

551 Fifth Ave.. New York 17. 

United Specialists, Inc., Pawling. 

Visual Sciences, 599BS Suffern. 

V^ ilher Msual Service, 119 State 
St., Albany. Also 28 Genesee St., 
New Berlin, New York. 



• PENNSYLVANIA • 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

917 Liberty Ave.. Pittsburgh 22. 

J. P. Lilley & Son, 277 Boas St., 
Harri^burg. 

Lippincott Pictures, Inc., 4729 
Ludlow St.. Philadelphia 39. 

• RHODE ISLAND • 

W eslcott, Slade & Balcom Co., 

95-99 Empire St., Providence 3. 

• W EST VIRGINIA • 

J. G. Haley, P. 0. Box 703, 
Charleston 23. 

Pavis, Inc., 427 W. Washington St., 
Phone 2-5311, Box 6095, Station 
A, Charleston 2. 

United Specialties, 816 W. Vir- 
ginia St., Charleston 2. 

Theatre Service & Suppiv Co., 

Phone 24043, Box 1389. lluiuing- 
ton. 



SOUTHERN STATES 



• ALABAMA • 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 506 Eight- 
eenth St., IVorlh, Birmingham. 

• FLORIDA • 

Norman Laboratories & Studio, 

Arlington Suburb, Jacksonville. 



Orben Pictures. 1615 Hendricks 
Ave. IVl. 9-19()(). Jacksonville. 

Southern Photo and News, 608 

K. LaFayettc .St., Tampa. 

• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 1118 W. Peachtree 
St., N.W.. ATwood 7.588, Atlanta. 

Stevens Pictures, Inc.. 101 Walton 
St.. N. W .. Atlanta 3. 

• LOUISIANA • 

Stanley Projection Company, 

2111,4 Murray St.. Alexandria. 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 1307 Tu- 
lane Ave., New Orleans. 

Stirling Visual Education Co., 

1052 Florida St., Baton Rouge. 

Delta Visual Service, Inc., 815 

Poydras St.. New Orleans 13. 

HarFilms, Inc., 600 Baronne St., 
New Orleans. Since 1915. 



• MISSISSIPPI • 

Herschel Smith Company, 119 

Roach St., Jackson 110. 

Jasper Ewing & Sons, 227 S. State 
St., Jackson 2. 

• TENNESSEE • 

Southern Visual Films, 687 

Shrine Bldg., Memphis. 

Tennessee Visual Education 
Service, 416 A. Broad St., Nash- 
ville. 



• VIRGINIA • 

Capitol Film & Radio Co., Inc., 

19 W. Main St., Richmond 20. 

National Film Service, 202 E. 

Carv St., Richmond. 



• ARKANSAS • 

Democrat Printing and Litho- 
graphing Co., Liltle Rock. 
Grimm-Williams Co., 115 W. 

Sixth Street, Little Rock. 



MIDWESTERN STATES 



• ILLINOIS • 

American F'ilni Rj'gistry, 24, E. 

Kiglith Street, (ihicago 5. 

Association Films, Inc., 206 S. 

Michigan Ave., Chicago 5. 



Jam Handy Organization, Inc., i 

230 \. .Michigan Ave., Chicago 1. 

Midwest Visual Equipment Co., 

6961 N. Clark St.. Chicago 26. 

Swank Motion Pictures, 614 N. 

Skinkcr Blvd.. St. Loui.s 5, Mo. 



• INDIANA • 



Burke's Motion Picture Co., 4.34 
LiiK oin Way \\ est. South Bend 5. 



• low A • 

I 

Pratt Sound Films, Inc., 720 3rd ( 

Ave.. S.E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Ryan Visual Aids Service, 409-11 
Harrison St.. Davenport. 

• K.4NSAS-MISSOURI • 



Kansas City Sound Service, 1402 
Locust St., Kansas City 6, Mo. 

Erker Bros. Optical Co., 610 

Olive St.. St. Louis 1. 

Swank Motion Pictures, 614 N. 
Skinker Blvd., St. Louis 5. 



• MICHIGAN • 



Engleman Visual Education 
Service, 4754-56 Woodward Ave., 
Detroit 1. 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

2821 E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 11. 

Capital Film Service, 224 Abbott 
Road, East Lansing, Michigan. 



• MINNESOTA • 

National Camera Exchange, 86 S. 

Sixth St.. New Farmers Mechanics 
Bank Bldg., Minneapolis 2. 

• OHIO • 



Ralph V. Haile & Associates, 

215 Vt'alnut St.. Cincinnati. 

Manse Film Library, 2514 Clifton 
Ave. Cincinnati 10. 

.4cademy Film Service Inc., 2300 
Payne Ave., Cleveland 14. 

Carpenter Visual Service, Inc., 

13902 Euclid Ave., East Cleveland 
12, Ohio. 



USE THIS DIRECTORY TO LOCATE THE BEST IN EQUIPMENT, FILMS AND PROJECTION SERVICE 



46 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Il 



LOCAL AUDIO-VISUAL SUPPLIERS 



Fryan Film Serrice, 3228 Euclid 
Ave., Cleveland 15. 

Snnray Filiiin. Ino., 2108 Payne 
Ave.. C!fvclaii(l 11. 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

.310 Talbott Building, Dayton 2. 

Twyman Filnin Inc., 400 West 

Kirst Stii-it. l)a\ton. 

M. II. Martin Company, 50 

Charles Ave., S. E. Massillon. 



• WISCONSIN • 



R. H. Flath Company, 2410 N. 3d 
St., .Milwaukee 12. 



WESTERN STATES 



• C.\LIFORNI.\ • 

Donald J. Clau8onthu«, 1829 N. 
Craig .Ave., .Mtadcna. 

Coast Visual Education Co., 5620 
Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28. 

Hollywood Camera Exchange, 

1600 N. Cahuenga Blvd., Holly- 
wood 28. 

Jam Handv Organization, Inc.. 

7046 Holivwood Blvd., Los An- 
geles 28. 

Ralke Company, 829 S. Flower St., 
l.os .Angeles 17. 

Spindler & Sauppe, 2201 Beverly 
Blvd., Los Angeles 4. 

Association Films. Inc.. 3.^1 Turk 
St.. ."^an Francisio 2. 

C. R. Skinner Manufacturing 
Co., 292-294 Turk St., San Fran- 
cist-o 2. 



• C<)I.OKM><» • 

Home .Movie ."^alett .Agency, 28 E. 
Ninth Ave., Denver 3. 



• OKI.AIIOMV • 

Vasoco, 2301 Clss»en, Oklahoma, 
City 6. 

II. O. Davis, ,522 N. Broadway, 
Oklahdma City 2. 

Kirkpalrirk. Inc., 1634 S. Boston 
Aviv, Tulsa .'>. 



• OREGON • 

Audio-Visual Supply Company, 

12') S. W . 12th Aw..'B.ac..n 3703. 
Portland 5. 

Moore's Motion Picture Ser>iee, 

.306 S. Vi . .Ninth Ave.. Portland .5. 



• TEXAS • 

Association Films. Inc., 1915 Live 

Oak.^t., Dallas 1. 

Audio Video, Inc., 4000 Ross Ave., 
Dallas 4; 1702 Austin Ave., 

Houston. 

George H. Mitchell Co., 712 N. 

Haskell, Dallas 1. 

Capitol Photo Supplies, 2428 
Guadalupe St., Phone 8-5717, 
Austin. 



• UTAH • 

Deseret Book Company, 44 E. So. 

Temple St., Salt Lake City 10. 



CANADA 



.\udio-Visual Supply Company, 

Toronto General Trusts Building, 
Winnipeg, Man. 



FOREIGN 



Distribuidora Filmica Venezo- 
lana, Du 1(>MM . .■>. A., Apartado 
706 Caracas, Venezuela, S.A. 



Qiialififd Dealers Invited 
to .\ppear in This Listing 

♦ If you are a s()erializiiig audio- 
visual di-aler or distrihulor. you arc 
invited to apply for listings in the 
National Directory pages of BUSI- 
NESS Screen. A nominal service 
c-harge is made for each acceptable 
listing. 

/Vppliratioii form M-nt on recpiest. 
Listings in tlies*- pages are subject 
to i-ancellation if products or serv- 
ires are Im-|ow the minimum stand- 
ard set |i\ the K.ditors and reported 
l>v UM-rs in this fielil. \X r in\ite 
rc.i.liT (i.irlii ipatiofi ami (lalri'ii.icr. 



A BUSINESS SCREEN READER SERVICE 



Script Orgonization Serves Field 
From Wide Range of Experience 

♦ l'araplira.-!ing Shakespiari- a bit, 
the script's the thing in the produc- 
tion of business films. The story 
not only incorporates the message 
to be put over but sets the style of 
treatment for nia\inunn iiiti-rcst and 
provides continuity and coherence. 
The newly formed Stu Abel organ- 
ization in Washington emphasizes 
a fresh approach to script problems, 
and the wide variety of his .services 
in the field provide the organiza- 
tion with experience in handling 
many types of production. 

With a stafT that include^!, besides 
the owner, an associate writer and 
an artist who prepares slorN boards, 
the organization currentiv is work- 
ing on V liter Horizon for the Ara- 
bian-.\nierican Uil Company, and 
scripts for the National Rifle Asso- 
ciation of America, Great l^kes- 
St. Lawrence Seaway Association, 
Gulf Coast Films of Hou.ston. Texas, 
the Economic Cooperation Associa- 
tion, Veterans Administration, Air 
Force and Navy. 

Familiar With I'. S. Prohlenis 

As an .Army enlisted man in 
World War II .Abel wrote training 
films for several years, and after he 
received his commission he was 
placed in charge of creating a civil- 
ian morale visual aid program for 
depots of ihi- .Army Service Forces. 
On (li.scluirge he became a project 
film supervisor for the State De- 
|>arlmenl, and wrote and helped 
produce International Conference, 
Security oj Information and The 
I'nited Sations Site. 

Next came the formation of Acail- 
emy Films with Richard L\ford in 
1947. They wrote and produced 
Crossroails for America, for the Re- 
search Institute of .America. 

I'Drnier I SDV .'^cript Chief 

In 19-18 .Al>el joine<l the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture as chief uf the 
s4'ripl department. In the |)eriod 
until he started his own organiza- 
tion last fall he turned out twenty 
hlni scripts. Among thus*- releuM-d 
or s<'heduled for early distribution 
were : (futhreah The Story of Hoof 
anil Mouth Disease: Deail Out, for 
the I . .S. Fore.Ht .S-rvicr: Journey 
liiirk and Seizure The Medical 

Treatment anil Social I'rohlems of 
Epilepsy, Veteran.s .Administration : 




hllM .SioHV (;o.SMl... ..'1 "Sfrak 

tng of Safety" seria at Sana Studioi 
(I. to r.) above are Or. Ining J. l.rr, 
Sorthwestrrn I'niiersity f technical ad- 
visor J ; Glenn Cnffin, Iniluslrial KJura 
tion director of .\arional Safety f.ouncil; 
Joseph G. Helzer. Sarra; Kent y ranees, 
.V.SC industrial editor; t seated) John 
Bancroft, writer: George DeDeclier, art 
director; and Helen A. Krupka, scenario 
iupervtsor, of the Sarra staff. 

The Triple Threat of Brucellosis; 
Your Enemy — Grasshopper : Only a 
Bunch of Tools and Building the 
Fire Line, Forest Service, and 
Week-end Paratrooper, for the U. S. 
.Air Force. 

The Sid Al«l studio is at 18.30 
Ji'flerson Place. \. W.. Washington 

United Productions Reelects 
Bosustow for His Sixth Term 
♦ Reelection of SteI'IIEV BosLS- 
TOW marks his sixth term as presi- 
dent of I'MTED PRODIC.TIONS OF 

America, maker of animated films 
for commercial companies and the 
U. S. Army and Navv and cartoons 
for Columbia Pictures Corp. 

John Hubley and .Ade Woolery 
■ 'otitinue as \ ice presidents and 
Maxine Da\ is as s,.<-retary-treasurer. 
Robert Cannon was advanced to a 
vice presidency. 

Besides Bosustow. HuMey and 
Canncm the board of directors in- 
cludes \jeit Rosen. VA Gershani, 
Alie Liss and Phil Eastman. 



' WRITER WANTED 

I Establtshed commeicial film producvr 
I d*«ir«i wTilai lor indiuuial and 

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■lotus, txickqtound and salaty it- 

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NUMBER 1 • VOLUME 12 



I 9S I 



47 




ff jr rot iviitr foioiNc chaik ruKfosn 

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• COMFORTABLE, wide, deep seats, backs 

• FOLD QUIETLY, quickly, snugly 

• LONG-LIFE replaceable rubber shoes 

• THREE SEAT STYLES— formed steel; 
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OVER • MILLION IN USCI 

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ftronch OfTic*! ond Diirribvlofi in Principal Citiei 



THK "BLIE CHIPS" IN AIDIO-VISUAL 
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Protect your films 
Ship in FIBERBILT CASES 

Sold af leading d««Urs 




Dealers' Town Moeling: 

(continued from pace twenty-seven) 
rhandising and selling films, from othi-r indus- 
Irirs and associations, Tlie two on inaTKipfim-nl 
|ir('si'tili'«l new prohlcms. After fominiltcfs luiil 
swi>aled out tiic wriliiif; and rovisiiiiis of m ripls. 
trained nien went to the field for huddles with 
distributors and dealers. Establishing that the 
program was recognized as vitally necessary and 
would be welcomed, producers were given the 
go-ahead, and the meetings were organized. 

Distributors representing the seventeen manu- 
facturers were to handle the sessions and meet 
Kical expenses. The films were to be shown in 
the sixty cities having television stations. There 
was to be no selling of sets; every dealer was 
invited to attend at no cost to him. 

R. C. ."^prague had charge of the shaping of 
the project. When he was elected president of 
the association Harry A. Ehle took over as chair- 
man of the Town Meetings Committee. Ehle had 
handled the radio technicians program. 

Nobodv tells the distributors or dealers what 
to do. Ehle explained. "The job is not one of 
telling people but of pointing out that in some 
instances, in some cities, some of our ideas may 
work. We are asking dealers to see these slide- 
films and adapt what they will to their own op- 
erations. We have many ideas; some will fit 
in some places, others elsewhere. If our slide- 
films are better in their conception than dealers' 
practices, we shall be repaid amply if they cause 
dealers to check and recheck their operations in 
order to stay in business longer." 

The active support of the television stations 
was had from the start, with realization that the 
sale of sets builds up audiences, and programs 
sell sets. 

Here's Content of Four Slidefilms 

Continuity for the series of films is estab- 
lished by the meeting of two radio-television 
shop owners at a convention: Andy successful. 
Don not so good, having trouble with credit. In 
the first film. One for the Money, on better 
financial management, among the subjects cov- 
ered are the best ratio of current assets to cur- 
rent liabilities, short and long-lerni loan uses 
contrasted, installment credit and liquid capital, 
relation of shop work tickets to service charges, 
cash basis for service, standard pricing, finance 
companies. 

Tiio for the Shoiv, the merchandising film, 
takes up store exterior, sign, interior, displays, 
cleanliness, arrangement. |)rice tags, bargain 
counter, advertising budget, mailing pieces, pub- 
lic relations, shows for youngsters, prizes, etc. 
More profitable service, taken up in Three for 
the Money, gives suggestions on limiting serv- 
ice area, contracts with local independent servic- 
ing organizations, checking of service reports, 
separate accounting, incentive compensation, 
rules for employe's personal a|>pearanie and con- 
duct. 

In the fourth film, t our to Co, are incorporat- 
ed many suggestions to improve salesmanship, 
such as immediate attention to customers, in- 
teresting them, closing deals, and merchandis- 
ing gifts for leads that pay off. 

.\fter each lliree-hour Town Meeting the print 
remains in the < ily indefinitelv. for showings at 
schools, to dealer meetings and other groups. 



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if Price $l6.'..nn ncl F. O. W ChicaK" 

EDL COMPANY 

MILLER STATION, GARY, INDIANA 



II 



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> quality still unexcelled 



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skilled Delivery 

of Sales Ammunition 




ining 
the Trainer 

The born salesman exists. But most often 
the high-scoring salesman is made, through 
experience controlled by a sales training 
program set up by a progressive company. 

The man who trains the salesman prob- 
ably isn't a born teacher. He needs to be 
trained for skillful transfer of his know-how. 

To distill the collective sales experience 
of leading salesmen, to be certain this 
"know-how" is translated and presented to 
others effectively, The Aluminum Cooking 
Utensil Co. uses the new "Training the 
Trainer" program which is keystoned by a 
sound motion picture, "You're Going Some- 
where," produced by 




JAM HANDY 



UALIZATIONS • TRAINING ASSISTANCE • SLIDEFILMS • TELEVISUALS • MOTION PICTURl 
YORK 19 WASHINGTON D. C. 6 PITTSBURGH 22 DETROIT 11 DAYTON 2 CHICAGO 7 LOS ANGELES 




report on 
production 





AN ANNUAL BUYER S GUIDE AND REVIEW 
OF QUALIFIED FILM PRODUCERS SERVING 
ADVERTISING • INDUSTRY • GOVERNMENT 




Mi»... 




Issue Two • Volume Twelve • 1951 




CONCEPT PANEL IN ACTION 



ATLAS SERVE 

Austin-Western Company 
Bowman Dairy Company 
J. I. Case Company 
E. I. duPont de Nemours & 
Encyclopaedia Brittannlco fi 
Froedtert Grain & Malting C 
Hotpoint, Inc. 
Inland Steel Company 
Link-Belt Company 
Marathon Corporation 
The Mengel Company 
National Bowling Council 
Phelps Dodge Corporation 
Sinclair Refining Company 
Sunbeam Corporation 
— and many others 



A, ,he crossroads of An-e-- ^^^ 

conveniently located " P-^^^JtlTnd TV comnterca.s. 
--'-'- ^""": I oU-.u-ed..e.enence 

.— i^::rr:;re...-etn.c,..es. 



-,.« CORPOBATIOM 

FILM VW OokPork.l 



ttlinois 



. AOslin 7S650 




eRT FIL-.' EDITING 




IS KMOWN 
BY THE COIVIPANY HE KEEPS 

We could fill many pages with commendatory letters from Caravel clients. The 
following excerpts, from just a few of these letters, tell their own story . . . 



AMERICAN CAN COMPANY: "VITAMIN 
Rl\ KRS in color. Ihc Ihmm show you made 
for us last Near, hids fair to set an all-limc 

hiph in school demand." 

ASSOCIATED MERCHANDISING CORPORA- 
TION; \Ne found Ihc pevipic al Caravel lo 
he c\tremel\ cooperative al all limes, gentle- 
men of their word, and sticklers for detail. 
Of equal importance. the\ never lost interest 
in our complicated prohlems and put considcr- 
ahlv more time and cfTort in our production 
than their contract called for." 

AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COM- 
PANY, lONC LINES DEPARTMENT: I el nic 

express to \ou person. ill\ Ihc appreciation of 
us all for the craftsmanship, patience and un- 
derstanding which vou have displaved ever 
since thai first distant meeting." 

GODFREY L. CAtOT, INC.: "I am really very 
happv ahoul our two new films. A STUDN' 
IN Bl.ACK and GOOD COMPANY, which 
Caravel produced fi'r us. The superior qual- 
ity v^hich \our competent staff huilt into 
these two productions is in a great way rc- 
sponsihle for their success as sales and public 
relations activities " 

FULLER BRUSH COMPANY: "I can't think of 
anv thing which would express more siitis- 
faction than the fact thai we have jusl con- 
tracted with vini to do a second picture " 

CLINTON FOODS, INC. (AGENCY - MAXON. 
INC.): "It has hcen Ihc general consensus of 
opinion that this industrial motion picture. 
GROW! H INDl'STRY. is one of the finest 
its viewers have ever seen ... I w.mt lo ex- 
lend mv. thanks lo you for a very superior joh 
of ciHipcralion by a group of people who 



have demonstrated thai thev know the busi- 
ness of making color motion pictures from 
A to Z." 

CLUETT, PEABODY A CO., INC.: "Wc are 

mighlilv pleased lo h.ive been honored with 
first pri/e for the best 16mm motion picture. 
KNIRRPRISE. which your organiution 
helped us produce . . . Congratulations to 
Caravel!" 

THE GENERAL FIREPROOFING CO.: "You will 
undoiiblediv K- };l.id lo kno« that our latest 
film . . IS being excellently received in the 
field. During the first sixlv days wc .irc able 
lo trace a hirge number of direct orders to 
the film." 

NATIONAL LUTHERAN COUNCIL: "Wc have 

been pic.iscd with t .ir.ivcl I ilms for the 
understanding manner in which they have 
assisted and cooperated with us in the prep- 
aration of ti.e script, the filming of the stories 
and diKTumcntaries and the final production. 
Wc have been aided in Ihcsc film priHiuctions 
by the stimulus of vour artistic imagination 
and vour sensitivity lo Ihc particular religious 
needs of our appeal. We have been complctelv 
satisfied with vour cooperation in ihcsc films 
and unhesitatingly recommend vour work for 
consideration of other religious groups." 

NEW YORK TELEPHONE COMPANVl "The Iwo 

films h.ive been shown lo mans thousands of 
our people, and their reactions seem lo con- 
firm our high hopes Thev have been favor- 
ably received and very favorably commented 
upon." 

THE PURE OIL COMPANY: 'Today WC showed 

our new color sound motion picture. TO- 
MORROW RICilNS lODAY. lo the Ch.iir- 



man of our Fxeculive Commiltee. Chairman 
of the Board. President of the Company, 
three vice presidents and a half do/cn more 
assistant vice presidents. Without exception 
they are extremely enthusiastic about the film, 
and feel it is the best thing the company has 
ever had along this line." 

RAYBiSTOS-MANHATTAN, INC.: "It is a rare 

thing these d.ivs to have your business ap- 
preciated, and lo gel such willingness and co- 
operation in exchange is indeed a great satis- 
faction and pleasure. We do wani lo ihank 
you all for the fine Caravel service." 

•OYAL TYPEWRITER COMPANY, INC.: We 

want to express our appreciation lo each sijff 
member of C aravel lilms who assisted in the 
development of our movie RICiHT AT THE 
.SI.\RT for their excellent cooperation and 
personal interest displayed during and since 
production. Reports from various p,irls of 
the country indicate that the film is being w«ll 
received bv typing edllCator^ ' 

SOCONY-VACUUM OIL COMPANY. INC.: 

"Many verbal comments from directors, man- 
agers, salesmen, dealers, and consumers as- 
sure us of another hit. Once again Caravel 
came through. Of course, after eighteen yean 
and about fifty pictures, we should be accus- 
tomed lo this sort of thing." 

TOWLE MANUFACTURING COMPANVl "The 

sound slidctiirn whuh vitu tr.ivc )iist civm- 
pleted for us. ONI- I OR THI" BtK)K. has 
been very well received by our management 
and sales organization. The entire produc- 
tion is a top-s^ualily ;i<b and wc arc proud lo 
show It lo our dealers as a lowie and Cara- 
vel PrixliKlion." 



The people responsible for the foregoing statements (names on request) speak 
from personal experience. We are immensely grofefui for their confidence — 
and for their generous appreciation of Caravel service and Caravel teamwork. 



CARAVEL FILMS 



730 FIFTH AVENUE 



INCORPORATED 

NEW YORK 



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ANSCO TYPE 238. Authorize your labora- 
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the color duplicating film you're now using. 
You'll be convinced, it's the finest color du- 
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ANSCO, BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK. A DIVISION OF GENERAL ANILINE 8. FILM CORPORATION. "FHOM RESEARCH TO REALITY.". 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




..Jielps A/nericrm Air/i/ies lead //w icorfd m passengers carrfef/f 

"The Bell & Howell equipment has contributed greatly to our rec- 
ord of carrying more passengers than any other airlines in the 
world," says Mr. James Dearborn, Director of Advertising, Ameri- 
can Airlines. "America's leading airline has always been keenly 
aware of the sales ability of Filmosound . . . and because of the 
dep«'ndnbility of these Bell & Howell projectors . . . the quality and 

You hiiv for lifr 

irhrii you huv 

Bell f Howell 



availability of servicing in each of the 77 cities the 'Flagship' Fleet 
serves . . . we arc planning even greater future use of Filmosound." 
Bell & Howell Filmosound proJ€?ctors can sell as succe.ssfully 
for you. You can show people exactly what they are buying. And 
you can def)cnd on Filmo.s<jund projectors to give your sales films 
an effective, flawless showing! 



16mm Single-Case Filmosound. Precision built for the finest 
tioublc-frcc performiinco — Runrnntccd for life. Full, natural 
sound, light weight, fast thrcndinK, complete film protection. 
New Super Proval lens gives brighter, clearer pictures. 




Gvof«ftt*«d *•» !■*• Durlfix lt(» ol Ih* produrt any drftcu 
m »i'rki: .,r. I ;i. or matrrlals will b* mnrdt«<l frr* i»m 

crpi lr.4r. i-..:i,.-i..n». 



'TrMt mit and «rnd today) 

••n t Hawaii Campaay 

TIM MiCarmkh Im^. Cki<a«* 4S 

Plrjv mtkI mc (rtT of rhari* your hvlpful bookWt. 
Movir. Go to Work." 



City 



ZaM« llal* 



N U M R F. R : 



VOIVMK i; 



1 ■> .•. I 




AN EDITORIAL FOREVi ORD 

■^ I'lic film tillc iiliovf. from a I nilril Slates 
Steel Corporation picture of reeent date, pro- 
vides both a syinbolie ehallenge and a "fore- 
word witlioiit u<)rd>" to tlie iiiinnislied liiisi- 
ness of prodiiciiif; better iiiisine^-s. fui'ttial and 
rdueational fibns to which every qualified 
producer reportiii': in flood faitli to tliis first 
annual |{u^ine>> Screen National Production 
Survev most emphatically subscribes. 

To be goinl pirliirfs. there must first be 
good idi'as, and >ucii film- are born of mu- 
tual understandinfi between informrd spon- 
sors and cajmhir firodiicers. I pon this foun- 
dation professionals alone can raise the 
strui-ture with elTiciency and the technical 
jjorfection at once obvious to the audiences 
for whom they are intended. 

Directories of all kinris. local an<l national, 
have listed without restraint all those who 
claim these abilities. This Business Screen 
report is a first attempt to put forth the mini- 
mum facts which a prospective film buyer 
should have to guide his procurement activ- 
ities. That is whv hundreds of mail inquiries 
were ilirected In all Usti'il ronipanifs of ftrry 
description throughout the U. S. askin*; for 
the essential facts presented in the twenty 
soliil pa;;e« which befiin on pajje 37. To each 
concern, where necessary, we sent four con- 
secutive requests, followed in many cases by 
furllier correspondence and telegrams. 

A complete report in each case will include 
the listing of at least five recent productions 
and sponsors. These films are, in a sense, the 
producer"- referenie-. Tliev inilicale the kind 
of work he does, the kind of companies or 
groups he serves, and their projection by the 
pr<i-pecli\e -ponsor will provide a minimum 
guide lo till- producer - creative and li'clinical 
qualifications. 

101 I .S. film producers have furiiisheil 
complete fai'lual clala to this national rcpnrl. 
Only four faileil to supply the titles of re- 
cently-produced films. The inevitable omis- 
sions and a few extravagances in this first 
eflort will be swiftly corrected as they are 
maale known in future issues of this pub- 
lication. -OHC 



BUSINESS SCF{EEN MAGAZINE 

'The Mnlioiial Huniiios.s jitiinuil of \itdio-Visiial Coniiniiniratitms' 

AnNI'AI. i'llolH ( I ion RkVIKW NlMBKR 



l*rovi4'l%' 4»f 4'«»lll«'llf»i 

Standards for the Factual Film Huy'r 

The ANA Films Conuniltee Checklist of Responsibilities 
Government Standards for iilrri Procurement 



2.5 
26 
27 



A Review of Sponsored Film Awarils 

The International Festivals at Kdinburgh and Venice 28 

The Freedoms Foundation Awards: 19.50 and 1049 Selections 2<) 

Film Festivals Provide Award Juries: Cleveland's Film Festivals. 

The Cleveland Management Clinic. Boston and Chicago Festivals 31 

Public Relations. Public Utility and Financial "Oscars" 33 

National Committee Honors Safety Films & Slidefilms 34 

The National Safety Awards From 1942 to 1951 

Geographical Index to Production Resources 

Business Screen Surveys Our Film Production Resources 37 

New England Region: Connecticut, Massachusetts 38 

Metropolitan New York City .38 

Middle Atlantic Region: New Jersey, New York State 43 

Pennsylvania and Washington, D. C .44 

Southeastern Region: Georgia 44 

Kentucky. Louisiana. North Carolina, Tennessee 45 

East Central Region: Indiana, Ohio 45 

Detroit, Michigan ; 46 

Metropolitan Chicago Area 47 

West Central Region: Illinois. Iowa 49 

Minnesota. Missouri. Wisconsin 50 

Southwestern Region: Texas 50 

Mountain States Region : Colorado 51 

West Coast Region: Northern California 51 

Metropolitan Los Angeles Area 52 

Pacific Northwest Region :' Oregon, Washington 55 

Canadian Film Producers 55 



58 



Editorial Features anil Departments 

lAVA Holds Fourth Amiual Meeting: Picture Story 

Business Screen Camera: Public Relations Society Stages 

First Annual Audio-Visual Clinic 62 

The DuPont Story: Film Review 63 

In the Picture Parade: Notes About New Films 66 

Business Screen Executive: Personalities 68 

New Products: Audio-Visual E(]uipnient & Accessories 70 

On the Production Line: Men Who Make Pictures 72 

Plus: The National Directory of Visual 
Education Dealers and nisTKiiu'TORs 



Issue Two of ^ oliime Twelve • March-April 



iy.->i 



Issut Two. \'olunic ThcIvo ot Business Screen Man.izine piililislirfl M.irch 2H, l'>51. Issiucl ."^ limes 
annually al six-week intervals al 1511 l%asl SiiiK-riiir .^treel. (^'liiiami 11. Illiiiois l)v Business Screen MaRa- 
zines. Inc I'lione \\ lliiehall 4-0807. O. H. Coelln. Jr., Editor and Publisher. In New York City: Rob- 
ert Seymour, Jr.. 48'' l"iitli Avenue. Teleiihone Riverside 9-0215 or ML'rray Hill 2-2492. In Los An- 
geles: Edmund Kerr, (i'i05 Hollywood Blvd. Teleiihone HKnipstead .?I71. Siihscription $3.0(1 a year; 
$5.00 iwo years Idonieslie); $4.(K1 and $7.00 loreign. Knlered as second class matter May 2, 194(1. at the 
post office al Chicago. Illinois, under .'\ct of March .i. 1879. Kniirc contents Copyright 1951 by Business 
Screen Magazines, Inc. Trademark registered U. S. Patent Office, .\ddrcss advertising and subscriiitioii 
inquiries to the Chicago office of publication. 



B I SI NESS SCREEN M A C A Z I N E 



FOR OUTSTANDING 

ACHIEVEMENT IN 

BRINGING ABOUT A 

BETTER UNDERSTANDING 

OF THE 

AMERICAN 
WAY OF LIFE 



1950 

"A LETTER FROM AMERICA' 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 

"IN BALANCE" 
Burroughs Adding Machine Co. 

•OUR AMERICA" 
Dodge Division, Chrysler Corp. 



Freedoms Foundation was chartered in 19(9 
for the specific purpose of conferring annual 
awards on Americans who make outstanding 
contributions to a better understanding of 
freedom b\' the things they write and say and do. 

Twenty-seven such awards have been made to 
public-minded organizations that have s|x>n- 
sored motion pictures dedicated to the ideals 
of our country. 

It has been our privilege to write and prcxluce 
the pictures that merited seven of these awards. 
We are proud to be associated with clients whose 
projects bear witness to their vision and their 
devotion to the concept of American freedom. 



CHICAGO- 

1345 Argylc Street 

NEW YORK 

385 Madison Ave. 



DETROIT- 

4925 Cadieux Rd. 



CLEVELAND 

310 Swctland Bldg. 



HOLLYWOOI 

598 1 Venice Blvd. 



1951 

"IN OUR HANDS" 
Borg-W'arner and Inland Steel 

"PROOF THROUGH THE NIGHT" 

Sash Motor Division. Sash Kehinator 

"A CLOSE D BOOK" 
Farm Bureau Insurance Companies 

"UNSEEN HORIZONS" 
Ohio Oil Company 




ST. LOLLS 

4053 Lindell Blvd. 



CINCINNATI 

Enquirer Bldi:. 
'Studio Facilities 



WILDING 

PICTURE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



T" r-i i-»rit'i^-vx.T fii xtt^ 





COMBINATION SLIDE, SINGLE and DOUBLE FRAME STRIP FILM PROJECTOR 



It's so easy fo use, too! Designed for extreme simplicity of operation 
combined with maximum efficiency. Finger tip tilt control, instantaneous 
framing and clear, needle-sharp focusing all combine to moke Viewlex top 
choice for slide or filmstrip projection before sizeable audiences. The quiet 
and powerful, motor-fan model gives utmost protection end safeguards the 
life of valuable films and slides. 



[%tM 




INC. • 35-01 QUEENS BOULEVARD • LONG ISLAND CITY 1, N. Y.( 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 





. . . make sure your slide film 
SOUNDS like a million! 



Contact an RCA Victor Custom Record 

Solti Studio, Dept. 3E: 

NEW YORK: 120 Eati 23rd Street 

New York 1 0, New York 
ORegon 7-8000 

CHICAGO: 445 North Lake Shore Dr!v« 
Chicago I I, lllinoit 
Whitehall 4-3215 

HOllYWOOD: 1016 North Sycamore Avenue 
Hollywood 38, California 
HilUide 5171 

Write for our Custom Record Brochure lodoy! 



Give it the benefit of RCA VICTOR engineering I 

First-rate visual presentation must have ttie support of frue-to-life 
ear-appeal to do its job most efPectively. That's why America's 
major slide film producers rely on RCA Victor for a thoroughly 
engineered record. RCA Victor's 50 years of experience and 
advanced electronic techniques assure you unbeatable service in... 

RECORDING PROCESSING PRESSING 

• The mojt modern sound-reproducing equipment ond facilities . . . loJesf 
developments in outomotic fro-ne-progression recording. 

• Engineers wtio specialize in slide film recordings assure the best presentation 
of your slide film story. 

• Pure Vinylite plastic records — both standard and microgroove — packaged 
in special slide film shipping cartons when desired. 

• An extensive music library service. 

• Careful handling and prompt delivery. 




custom 
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Radio Corporation of America 

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COLOR FILM DEVELOPERS, Models 19, 20 

ond 26 completely and oulomolically process Ansco 
Color Film to highest professional standards. 35mm and 
16mm models. Hondle both comera and print stock. En- 
tirely lelfcontoined with refrigeration ond re-circuloting 
systems, oir compressor ond positive temperature controls. 



DOUBLE HEAD PRINTERS, 35mm ond 16mm, 
offer four practical printing procedures: 1. Composite 
print with positive stock ond picture negative threoded 
over one head and sound negotive on the other. 2. 
Double print makes two positive prints from one nega- 
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4. Double print using both heods independently with 
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Top flight photography is only the 
beginning of a fine motion picture. The steps 
between the camera and the screen are equally important 
and make the big difference between mediocrity and 
perfection. For 20 years, the motion picture industry in Hol- 
lywood and throughout the world has relied on Houston- 
Fearless processing equipment to produce the finest results 
while assuring maximum 
efficiency, speed, economy 
and dependability. 





COLOR AND DENSITY SCENE TESTER and Sen.;- 

tometer Combination accompli»kes single frame print tests with 
15 combinotions of print filters. Provides a quick, eosy ond ac- 
curate method of determining the proper fiher pock to be used 
in color printing. Valuable in balancing two print stock emul- 
sions, indicating voriations in overoll speed and individuol layer 
speed and in determining the proper processing techniques to 
control voriobles of contrasts. 



Write for information on specially-built 
equipment for your specific needs. 

• DEVELOPING MACHINES • COLOR PRINTERS • FRICTION HEADS 

• COLOR DEVELOPERS • DOLLIES • TRIPODS • PRINTERS • CRANES 



11801 W. OLYMPIC BLVD • LOS ANGELES 64, CALIF. 

WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF MOTION PICTURE PROCESSING EQUIPMENT" 



REPORT ALL NEW TECHNICAL AND TRAINING FILMS TO BUSINESS SCREEN 



i 



♦ A complete regi.slry of all existing terhnieal and 
training inolion pirtures prodiiii-d hy and for busi- 
ness and industrial purposes is maintained liy the 
Editors of Business .Scree:n. Please notify us of 



any new pictures completed, whether for internal 
or external use. so this listing can lie maintained 
for the Itenefil of all. \<ldress all notices to: Index 
of Training Films. 150 K. Superior. Chicago 11, III. 



SMPTE Convention Will Open 
April 3; SO Papers on Agenda 

♦ .More than lifl\ ti-< liiiii;ii reports 
on new developments in equipment i 
and techniques, with emphasis on 
motion pictures and television for 
industrial, medical and military 
uses, will he heard liy memhers of 
the SociKTV OK Motion I'utlkk 
AND Tklkvision Kncineeks at the 
69th semiannual convention April 
.30 through May 4. with headquar- 
ters at the Hotel ."<tatler in .New 
York. 

With scientists, engineers and 
tecliniciuns from all branches in at- 
tendance, the opening session will 
be marked with a presentation of 
papers chosen to cover a wide field 
of activities, according to William 
C. Kuiizmaiiii. convention vice pres- 
ident of the Society. 

Three sessions will l)e held daily 
after opening day. with the ban- 
quet-dance May 2nd. 

W. H. Rivers of the Eastman 
Kodak Company is program chair- 
man. Heading the papers commit- 
tee is E. S. Seeley. of the Altec 
Service Company, New York. 

Advertising in Mobilization Era 

Is A.A.A.A. Theme on April 19-21 

♦ Ad\ertisiiig in a mobilized econ- 
omy is the central subject of the 
33rd annual meeting of the .Ameri- 
can A.s.SOCIATION OF AdVERTISINi. 

Agencies April 19 through 21 at 
the Greenbrier hotel, White .Sul- 
phur Springs. \^ .Va. Because the 
reservation list must be limited !(■ 
400, only key officers of media and 
advertising organizations are being 
invited. 

Senator Paul H. Douglas of Ilfi- 
nois will speak at the annual din- 
ner. Among other convention speak- 
ers will be Ur. Richard Glenn Get- 
tell, chief economist. Time, Inc.: 
Ralph W. Hardv. director. Govern- 
ment relations department. National 
Association of Broadcasters: and 
Dr. Ernest Dichter, psychological 
consultant. 

Castle Announces Defense Film 
"Survival Under Atomic Attack" 

♦ For home, school and factory 
showing is the new 16mm sound or 
silent Castle film. Survival under 
Atomic Attack!, available in three 
editions from United World 
Films. Inc.. 144."; Park Ave., New 
York City 29. .An 8inm version and 
a 33mm lilmstrip also may be had. 



BARGAINS in brand new 
16mm sound ENTERTAIN- 
MENT FEATURES. S75.00 to 
S125.00 per print, outright sale. 
Send for free list. EDWIN 
SCHNATZ, Route 4, Xenia. O. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGA/INt 








K 



merica 




" The Magic Key " 



CARNATION COMPAJ 



U. S. CHAMBER OF COMMEF 

SHELL OIL COMPAl 

CATERPILLAR TRACTOR COMPA] 

GENERAL ELECTF 

E. I. duPONT de NEMOURS & ( 

RIE ADVERTISING AND SALES CL 

SURFACE COMBUSTION CO 

SYRACUSE UNIVERSI 



AMERICAN ASSN. OF ADV. AGENC 
CHICAGO TRIBU 



THE BORDEN COMPAi 



BURNS & COMPANY. L' 

THE BOISE AD Ci 

J. WALTER THOMPSON COMPA 

SERVEL, U 

AUSTRALIAN ASSN. ADV. AGENC 



GANNETT COMPA 



J^ess than a year ago, the dramatic story of advertising and free 
enterprise was first told to America in "The Magic Key," a 
l6nim sound-color film, produced as a public service by the 

Raphael G. Wolff Studios. Civic, educational, and business 
leaders have acclaimed the film . . . and bought copies for 

showing to management, employee and consumer groups. 
Today it is more important than ever that every American 

understands and appreciates this great heritage . . .The Magic Key 
to the highest standards of living the world has ever known. 



THE GRAND RAPIDS PR 



THE MILWAUKEE SENTIP 
ADV. CLUB OF NEW ORLE/ 



ADV. FEDERATION OF AMERI 



PUTMAN PUBLISHING COMPA 

SEAGRAM DISTILLERS CORPORATl 

JOHN DONNELLY & SC 

CLEVELAND ADVERTISING a 

BROWN-FORMAN DISTILLERS CO 




BROWN SHOE COMPA 



THE SEVENUP COMPA 
SCOTT PAPER COMPA 



UFE MAGAZI 



THE NEWBURGH NE 
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMEI 




"Meet Outstate 
Michigan" 



A 30 minute Sound 
Color Motion Picture, 
Covering Industrial, 
Agricultural and 
Recreational Facilities 
of Michigan outside 
Detroit. 

Sponsored by 

Consumers Power Company 

Jackson, Michigan 



This production is currently being 
released to Civic Clubs, Educa- 
tional and Industrial Groups. 



Our clients include Pan American World Airways, Atlantic Division; 
Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company: Mary Grey Hosiery Mills; 
Presbyterian Church in the U. S.; The Southern Company, and Subsidiaries: 
Georgio Power Company, Alabama Power Company, Mississippi Power 
Company, Gulf Power Company; Deere & Company: Central and South 
West Corporation, Jefferson Mills and others. 



Serving American Industry for 14 Years 



CHARLES 


D. 


BEELAND 


COMPANY 




Motion Picture Production 
I6MM...35MM...Te/ev;sua/s 


Walton Building 






1 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Scott Fletcher Leaves EB Films 
to Join the Ford Foundation 

♦ (.'.. Si. ,11 Mil, h.r, «lin ha- rv 
sigiii-(l llic |(rfsi(lfiK y of KiicNcIn 
|mc(iiu lirituiinicu Films, Iiir., efTec 
live next nuinth, to join the staff o 
thf Ford FiiuiiilalioM, liritifis to th< 
t'ouiiilation's cilucatiijiial |iri>gran 
in the field <if human welfare u idc 
ex|)erieiiee in the husinessi and pro 
fessional world. 

In World War II he was an ex 
ecutive dirertor of the (^oniniitte* 
for Kconomic Development, ol 
which he now is a trustee. Hi 
served the Studehaker Corporation 
in many parts <jf the world before 
becoming KBF's president in 1946, 
was chairiiian of the finance com- 
mittee of the Film (iouncil of Amer 
ica for two years, is a trustee of 
the China Institute of America, 
member of the Board of Editors of 
Encyclopaedia Rritannica and di- 
rector in charge of the original pub- 
lication iif the (ireat Books of the 
World. 

As EBF president he established 
five regional managerships with dis- 
trict managers in practically all 
states. The company's operations 
have expanded to the production of 
KM) filinstrips. a library of KtO 
classroom pictures with a distribu- 
tion increase of 25 per cent, and 
the making of films in new fields of 
adult education. 

Film Featured In Heart Drive 
Now Available to All Groups 

* Now available generally is (riiard 
Your Heart, the American Heart 
AssociATlo.N motion picture which 
features the current campaign of 
the organization and its local aflil- 
iates. The production story has as 
its central character a middleaged 
worrier who returns to a normal 
pace of living after a sound warn- 
ing from within. 

The picture, indorsed by a jiirv 
of heart specialists of the .American 
Medical .Association, and by Indi- 
ana I niversity's .Audio-Visual Kdu 
cation (!enter for its "interesting 
plot framework and excellent ani- 
mated sequences." may be pur- 
chased from Bray Studios, Inc.. 72'> 
Broadway. New York 19. 



You can buy titles for less than 
KNIGHT QUALITY sells for, but 
you cannot get greater value at 
any price. That's why our titles 
cost less in the long run. 

THE KNIGHT STUDIO 

341 E. Ohio Street, Chicago It, Illinois 



10 



BUSINESS SCR KEN M.4G.\ZINE 



Il 



RCA 



snevf 



400 Junior 



iavAXa^^la\\t (Complete Single-Case Portable) 

16mm Sound Movie Projector 



The new "400" Junior has all the features 
you have looked for in a I6mm sound 
projector. It is compact and portable. 
Speaker in lift-oflf cover, projector, and 
connecting cables are all contained in an 
attractive lightweight, single-case unit. 
Easy and quick to set up. So simple to 



thread, even a child can do it. Pictures at 
(heir best in brilliance and contrast. 
Sound reproduced with dramatic realism 
and full tonal range. Meets every require- 
ment of fully professional quality. Priced 
within limited budget requirements of 
schools, churches, business and industry. 




So light In w*lght 
• ichoMlltirl un piik It 
up to pUtr on a uhlr. 



11 rile Dept. O-1 7 for complete hijornialion. 



VISUAL RKODUCTS 

RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 



M MBF. R 2 • \ t)I I M K 12 • 195 I 



II 



They see 
better and 

remember 
longer... 



.^' 



with the new 
4-way Better 

RADIANT 

SCREEN 

Every member of your audience — 
from a class or meeting room to a 
big auditorium — will pay more at- 
tention to projected pictures when 
they are shown on Radiant's amaz- 
ing "Vyna-Flect" screen surface. 
All pictures are more brilliant. 
Black and whites or colors are 
clearer, sharper, truer. That's why 
interest doesn't lag. That's why 
your message sinks in more deeply 
— and is remembered longer. 

A Really Improved Screen Fabric 
The new "Vyna-Flect" screen fab- I 
ric is made by an exclusive Radiant 
process. Millions of tiny mirror- 
like beads reflect the light instead 
of absorbing it — which assures you 
the brightest, clearest pictures. 
This surface is mildew-proof and 
Kvi.vhab/e— so that you can always 
have a perfect projection surface. 
Finally — the surface is flame-proof 
— i>r ovidmK .'idded safety. 

Sendfor FREE BOOK 
"More Brilliont Projection" 

crammed wtlh piocli- 
col inf ormalion on 
how to gat the boit 
proi*clion under all 
condiliont. At the 
tame lime we will 
send you o lomple of 
the new Rodionl 
.|^>l1 1 "Vyrto-Flect" tcreeit 
fabfk to rou con «ee 
how much better your 
on thii miracle fobric. 

RADIANT MFG. CORP. 
1232 So Tolman, Chicago 6 



RADIANT 



S C I I I N • 



[lie Business Film Year 



♦ 1050 was a good year fur llir liu>iiics> tiliii 
industry. TIhtc witc. in ficiuTjil. nmrc piclurfs. 
better pictures and iiiort' |)('()|)li' to .see tlietii than 
in any other year before. 

Writers and directors strove mightily for the 
human elleet. More effort was made to under- 
stanil the audience and to create fihns that would 
get inside minds, not just talk at thetn. In many 
cases this showed effectiveness, in others, un- 
fortunately, the result was merely a spurious 
folksincss. Under the best direction, non-profes- 
sionals walked away with the best portrayal of 
believable characters. Script writers, with nota- 
ble exceptions, followed story formulas that have 
l)een familiar for years. In truth, many script 
formulas were concocted by writers reluctantly 
through sponsor insistence, but the result was 
the same. There needs to be much more willing- 
ness all around to use more imagination and to 
try new storv telling methods. 

Better Color and More of It 
Color was used more in 19.50 and it was al- 
most always better color. This was due not onl\ 
to improved film stock but also to more experi- 
mentation and greater knowledge of what can 
be done with color. Cameramen seemed less 
satisfied with producing garish displays of the 
primary colors, succeeded in showing scenes 
with normal, realistic, more believable tints. 
Some of the best examples were, indeed, se- 
quences in fog. rain, nighttime and dust, proving 
for sure that the old axioms on color restricting 
its use to the best conditions are not true. 

Art directors showed a few new ideas that 
were interesting. Model animation gained new 
impetus. In slidefilm work new techniques of 
wash and stick drawings and cut-outs showed 
an ingenious treatment of cut and dried stuff. 
Many large corporations still relied on non- 
specialized, often uninformed film procurement 
and supervision officers. This is a hard nut to 
crack because many firms will always be "once- 
in-awhile"' film users, have no opportunity to 
develop experience. The accumulated know-how 
of specializing film executives such as members 
of the Industrial Audio Visual Association could 
do wonders if applied to the problems of many 
companies not now meml)ers. With constantly 
expanding membership and greater interest in 
the semi-annual workshop sessions, the I.A.V..\. 
is doing much to alleviate this problem. 

Film Executives in Responsible Role 
Responsible and intelligent executives in charge 
of sponsored film programs are important in 
counterbalancing the conflicting interests of two 
widely divergent prip|»onents of the non-theatrical 
film: the rabid aficionadi)S sitting around in 
avant garde art film groups, and the hardfaced 
tycoons who insist on eking out as much com- 
mercialism as possible in each reel. 

Advertising agencies were even less of a factor 
in the business film field in 1950. Actually the 
great majority of commercial films arc not "'ad- 
vertising" in any sense, cannot be handled 
easily on a \W/l commission basis, and most 
agencies are not equippeil to provide adeijuate 
service on a fee basis. There was wider recog- 
nition that although television subjei-ts. short 
or long, are "commercial" and on film, they are 



a distincllv ilifTerent medium from the business \ 
lilm f<ir >|)e(iali/.e<l audieni'es. 1 

Not many, but a few new business film pro- ; 
ducers of real stature gained recognition during 
the year. For the most part, a process of attri- 
tion continued to eliminate the enthusiastic scmi- 
pros will) limited uar-liiiie experience, anil the 
cippnrlunisls who set up shop to capitalize on 
W films with a U-v, business films per year for 
gravy. 

Egi'ii'MENT Co.vn.MES IN Good Siim'I.v 
Equipment continued in excellent supply in 
1950. Few outstanding improvements were made, 
however, and the complications of the motion 
picture and slidefilm projc-clion process continue 
to be a problem to thi' field. Film users will 
never be satisfieil until an automatic, self-thread- 
ing, fool-proof projector is developed that will 
eliminate split sprocket holes, sound failure or 
distortion and fficker — problems that happen 
iiflen enough, even in major showings before 
iiiipiirtant audiences, to give a poor impression 
of the medium to prospective users. 

Proof of the business film pudding, of course. 
is the state of its audiences. The experience of 
all distributors, in 1950, showed that industry's 
problem was not in finding audiences so much 
as in supplying film to an ever increasing num- 
ber of influence groups requesting them. It was 
nol unusual for a good subject with one or two 
hundred prints available to be booked solid for 
6 to 12 months in advance. It was recognized 
that much research was necessary to find out 
what audiences thought of films. Several proj- 
ects along this line were undertaken which 
showed that films contitme to hold a first posi- 
tion as a communicator of ideas. • 



"CAUTION AT THE CROSSROADS" 

(Sponsor: Not'!. Assn. of Automotive Mutual Ins. Cos.) 




WINS 
liiT AWARD 



For Sound Slidefilms 
as Judged by 

NATIONAL COMMITTEE ON 
FILMS FOR SAFETY 

Produced by 



n STUDIO* I 



(iicnoc».".< to*. 



317 EAST ONTAIIO STint. CHICAGO II. lUMOIS 



rilfViSION- MOTION PICTUIIS-SIIM nui-T( 



12 



B I .S I N E S S SCREEN M .\ G .-^ Z I N E 










Iii.ii4^ 




D 





TAPE R ECOR D E R 



It's no wonder that the Revere Recorder is so 
popular with teachers and students everywhere! 
No other educational aid adds so much efficiency 
and interest to a class — allows students to profit 
so readily by hearing their own and their class- 
mates' mistakes. 

School boards appreciate the economy of 
Revere, too. Priced considerably lower than other 
recorders of comparable quality. Revere offers 
such outstanding features as simplified controls 
. . . true-as-life sound . . . full hour's listening on 
every reel . . . erasable, re-usable tape . . . and 
powerful, constant speed motor. 

You owe it to the welfare of your school to in- 
vestigate this remarkable equipment. See your 
Revere dealer, or write for further information. 



REVERE CAMERA COMPANY 



CHICAGO 16, ILL. 



MODflT-lOO 



n69' 



REVERE RECORDER IS INVALUABLE FOR: 

foreign language classes * stenography- 
practice dictation * band and orchestra 
rehearsals • speech correction • choral 
group study • dramatic presentations • 
debating • preserving important lectures 
• on-the-spot interviews. 



REVERE 16mm SOUND 
MOVIE PROJECTOR 

Show* educational filnu at 

' ■ r brat! Bright, clrar 

-) image, and finrat 

I : ■ -Iter Tonr" sound. 

ytyt wlpnt movm. too. Ki* 

'rfm*.Iv «imp!<. to act up 

i>ovi^ car- 




li-.iii.i.-H n^ v)p..afci>r. C^Om- 

pletv unit weigh* <>nlv 

""*co«rtm»299»° 



NUMBER 



\ ( 1 1 1 M K I .' 



I '> '. I 



1.^ 




GREAT PICTURES 
SERVE A GREATER AUDIENCE 

Today's Ever-Widening Audience for good sponsored motion pictures is a trib- 
ute to the high standards of production quality and the popular interest in the 
useful subject matter provided by sponsors and achieved for them by the ex- 
perienced producers in this field. 

A single color motion picture, currently showing, has already reached more 
than 30.000.000 Americans, young and old. Other films are rapidly accumulating 
similar evidence of their appeal and establishing proof of the potent force of 
this COMPLETE medium of idea communication. 

Modern is proud to be a member of the sponsor-producer-distributor team 
in which our nationwide network of 27 regional film exchanges completes the 
cycle from "script to screen". More than that. Modern's unequalled and exclusive 
system of controls has changed the entire ai^pect of I6min distribution into an 
economical, efficient, and certified pattern of measurable results for the sponsor. 

Because it is less expensive to reach more people via this efficient film dis- 
tribution network. to[>-flight producers unhesitatingly recommend Modern Talk- 
ing Picture .Service to their client*. W e will continue to merit such good faith 
by keeping pace with the quality of their product and the scope of its potential 
;mil <'<iii<tantly increasing audience. 

A Modern Talkinn Picture Service representative is 
conveniently located near you for consultation 
and assistance on your sponsored film program. 




MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, me 

4S lOCKEFEllEI PIAZA • NEW YORK CITY 2 0. NY ■ CIrtIa 6-0910 
141 EAST ONTAIIO STREET • CHICAGO 11. ILLINOIS • SUptrior 7-0S8S 
611 SOUTH FLOWER STREET • LOS ANGELES 17, CALIF • MAiJIion 9-1121 



Labor Shortage Points Film Use 

* Willi sliiirlugcs i<( iiiTUptitioii; 
persoMMcl in many sections iidtc 
b\ the Miircau of KmpioN merit S< 
curity of the I . S. I)i-|iarliii<-nt <i 
Labor, the news and reviews of ski. 
training and "attitude" films uliici 
appear in each issue of Bl'sines 
ScHKK.N take on added significanci 

Job openings in the [irofessional 
skilleil unil semi-skilled (ields lia\ 
led recent increases in local de 
mands, says the Bureau, and espe 
cialiv needed are mechanical am 
electrical engineers, vocatioiia 
training teaeliers. draftsinen. nia 
chinists. tool and die makers, skillec 
aircraft as.semblers, pattern an< 
model makers, carpenters, lumber 
men. raftsmen and woodchoppers. 

As of January 1(1 the opening" 
listed for skilled personnel totaled 
12,243: .semi-skilled. 11.552. an.) 
professional and managerial. 6.677 
Training films for workers in these 
three groups constitute a large part 
of the data in the recently issued 
Index of Training Films, another 
Business Screen reference addition 
to its growing Film Guide Librar\ 
The 92 -page Index lists and il' 
scribes more than 2'XM) availai'l 
training motion pictures and slide 
films, many of them on a free-loan 
basis. 

Copies can be obtained for *■■-' ' ' 
from Business Scree.n, 150 I ~ 
perior St.. Chicago 11. 

Drive-ins Built in 1950 Double 
Total and Add 1,458,000 Seats 

♦ The drive-in theater, which li.i- 
proved to be an increasingly iinpcir 
tant outlet for sponsored films, mm' 
than doubled its number in I'ASi 
adding 567.146 car capacity to tln- 
industry-within-industry. 

Exhibitors last vear placed in op- 
eration 9.i5 new theaters and had 
219 more under construction at 
year-end. a total of 1,154. compared 
with the estimated 1.000 nationwiil' 
figure in use in 1949. 

From the audience standpoint, a 
750-car drive-in theater is equiva- 
lent to a 2,000-seat indoor. .Manv 
drive-ins can serve 1.000 cars and 
are investments of S300,0tK) ..r 
more. At an average of SSO.tXMi. 
the new drive-in houses at a col 
of S92.3I6.(HM) added l,4S8,(HHl 
seats, a healthful market for indus- 
trial productions. 



EXECl TIVF. SECRETARY, non. 
iheiilrif-al hooker, several year* 
experient-e »eekin(i liimilar posi- 
tion Ihnini field. Responfilile 
offire m;ina|ier. free lo Iravel. 
availalile Inimedialelv. Write Box 
3B, Bl SINES.S SCREEN. l.iO E. 
Soperior Si., Chicago 11. 



14 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAG.AZINE 





^Vierevef « 



fCO* 



lbi»** 






,o««A»Vie^--; 



ri\««* 



ofe 









kv»«^*' 



r-^ 



^. 



\ 







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^^JV-S***" 










Af/^cAe// CctHfe^a corporatiomIH 

666 WIST HARVARD STRUT* OLINDALI 4, CALirORNIA • CAILI ADORISSt "MITCAMCO" 



•5% •! th« n«ti«a piclvrat ikvmm ia thaalrtt tlir««|b»«l lb« warld ar* f ilaiad with a Mil«li«ll 



^', ^ •^•' •'?:i:;2-::5^£i i>r«:"'"^f^ 





Feed-O-Motic* Conveyor 




Vocumatic Platen* 



All need for pointing with a conventional 
pointer is eliminated when >ou put the new 
Beseler VU-LYTE Opaque Projector to work 
for jou. 

When delivering >our talk. >ou do not even 
have to stand near the screen, ^ou can actu- 
ally operate the projector yourself and, in7/i- 
oiil leinliif! the insliiiimnt. indicate accurately 
any detail of your illustration material by 
simply turning a knob. 

The knob, conveniently located near the 
front of the VL-L>TF.. controls the Beseler 
POINTEX' PROJECTION POINTER, a 
built-in device which throws a lighted arrow 
onto <j(i.v part of the screen, and just e.\actly 
where vou want it. 

"Pointing out" details in this way proves 
extremely easy and convenient for the lecturer 
or demonstrator, since projected material is 
seen at all times in proper perspective — and 
not distorted, as when a speaker is obliged to 
stand close to the image. 

The POINTEX PROJECTION POINTER 

is but one of the valuable Beseler innovations 
and refinements which put the VL-I->TE at 
"the head of the class" — make it the most 



modern and versatile visual teaching tool 
available. Many other outstanding V'L'-LVTE 
features team to help you get top-notch re- 
sults with maximum ease and economy of 
operation. For example: 

1. YOU CAN use the VU-IYTE in o pDrliolly- 
lighled room. Tofol darkness is not necessory in 
order to obtain clear, sharp images and brilliant 
tolors — because VU-LYTE provides e«lro 

illumination. 

2. YOU CAN feed mixed or continuous copy 
through smoothly, without light flashes, by means 
of the Beseler FEED-O-MATIC metol belt CON- 
VEYOR. As new copy is fed in at the left side of 
the projector, preceding copy is ejected from the 
right side. 

3. YOU CAN use copy "as .s " — without 
mounting or inserting into holders. The unique 
Beseler VACUMATIC PLATEN* holds all copy ob- 
soJutefy f\af during projection. A full 8V]x11 page 
letter or a postoge stamp can be proiected with 
equol ease, without curl or flutter. 

4. YOU CAN use VU-LYTE on on uneven 
surface — project on smoll or large screens. In 
addition, VU-LYTE is an amaiingly quiet and 
cool-operating opoque projector. 



THE NEW 



■ OPAQUE PROJECTOR 



These jJtjuceJ. exclutiie features, plus others, 
are incorporaltJ in j ftrofalor th.tt tteighs only 55 tbs, 

^n,l ,1 RiDUCED IN PRICE, -iit lor Ittt 
Jemouttratiou of the [nfcision-built I'L'-LYTE in your own 
Projection room. And for more information regarJing this truly 
new concept in opaque projection, ask for booklet^ y 



•Pat. Ptnd. 




CHARLES 



(S<5kf&&^ 



60 Badger Avenue, Newark 



COMPANY 

8 , N . J . 



The Wor/d's Lorg«if Monufocfurer of Opoque Projection Equipment 



16 



B L s 1 .^ K > ■ 



. ( R K K N M .A C A Z I N E 



ilereiourcdseonQmi 



k al-iinpor+ant dIj^b [e^u(e d 



COLUMBIA 

SLIDEe9)FILM 

TRANSCRIPTIONS 




COLUMBIA TRANSCRIPTIONS. A DIVISION OF COLUMBIA RECORDS. INC. ei> 



New York: 799 Seventh Avenue, Circle 5-7300 

Los Angeles: 8723 Alden Drive, BRodshow 2-5411 

Chicago: Wrigley Building, 410 Michigan Avenue, WHiteholl 6000 



NUMBER 2 • \ Ol.l M K \l • 1 ■> '• I 



S»'v 



'»■, "^ V»j»-r»i Mm^» 



17 



! 




■■ TaiifilewoiHl" 

I MTKI) STATKS INFORM VTION 
SKRVICK OVKRSKAS I'R()(;RAM 



Daciitiii'ntnry nn thf lifrkshire 
^lusit• f-'t'Atiral. 




"Willis to Hawaii"' 



PAN AMERICAN \\<)RIJ> AIRVt AYS 



Documfiittiry iravvtttfine lo 
ftrotniilv tifkvt stitcs. 




"Steeiiiit: With Slaiidaids" 



FORD MOTOR COMPW^ 



llliliiilr film /»r 6600 
f'tirti ftimuvti. 




"The American Cowboy 

FORI) >10'r0R COMPANY 
AMERICANS AT HOME SERIES 

f'uhlir Hflnliims. 





MOTION PICTLRES FOR SALES 
PROMOTION, PUBLIC. RELATIONS. 
TRAINING & INFORMATION PURPOSES 



"Kcscuieli-I'altfiii lor Pro^resf 



THE TEXAS COMPANT 



Einptoyef In/orniation, 






'Fishin}' in Alaska" 



NASH M<noRS 



Siilrn itnttuntiitn tn mnkf unlrt fnr Hrnivrn 
at thf runttttiinily frrft. 



••Tarh.-el Wildlife" 

N<)RTII CAROLINA WILDLIFE 
RESOIRCES COM^IISSION 

hducntinn im ( ttitsfrrntitm. 



"The Doiihle-Deckcd (ilipiier" 

P\N \MFRI( \N WORLD MRW \\S 
A RECORD OF ACHIEN EMENT 



thttc thr tmrhl's tarfirnt pnsnfuprr 
xhift Iran lutrtt. 



18 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



The Film Producer's 
Qi¥ii lOmin Projector! 





I lirrliiliirr. in tlir uloi'iii <■ iif |>ii-< i.->l<>n-litiill. |ii <>fr>Miiiial 
i|Uiilil\ jinijiM lion ri|iii|>iiiftil. it ha> Im-<mi iiii|>iissilili- tn 
rr|>r(i<linf the Irui- i|uiilitii-> nf piclun- and »<iuiiil wliicli 
Kniiin (irmlucrrs an- imw urhir\ing. Tin- l><A'r\ "I'lttC 
is till- idi-ntical J \N ijiiinl Ariii> -Nav) I l(>iiiiii fi|iii|i 
incnt <lc\fli>|ir(l li\ l)i-Vr\ In mcfl |iri-viiiu!tl\ unattaiiialilr 
staiiilartU of |HTfiirinaiu-c IM.I s timlianiral <lrcii)!tli and 
ili-|irndal>ilil\. Allhnufili our rnlirc output i?- alloratitl to 
ihc govi-rnnicnt. <>|Mf'ial authorization inakf>» snnit* cijuii)- 
nirnt ax ailalilr to r\\ iliaii prodintT-* (or thrir rrvirw rooino. 
Tlic [icrfnrrnancr cliart provi-M ronclu-ix rl\ tlial tllr 
I)cVr> "I'MO" i* till- ('i|ui|iin<-nt \ou should have In ninlrh 
ri^id govcrnnirnt fihn print spcrifirations. 

Thr pictures Irfl flop to bollom) ihow ihr romplrle porlabililt at 
thr ihrer separair lighlurifhl iinils nl ihr Itrt'ry "I'm" Hi 
sound pmirrlor : I'Ji JOu-atI iim;i/i(Srf ; 11) J.iiirall InuihfKakrr. 
Mounting hasr ataththle tor hooth inhtallntion n\ shown ahotr. 



f.ibovrt Onr of thr driuir revieK rooms ot 
Tildinf I'ictutt Prodtictiorts. list. C.hirafo «■-.<■.•• 
Khrrr the Ptl'ty "PRO" ii on romndthr 
duts. Similar imslmllaliont art in rrfular »4-.';..< 
among olhtr quality film produrrrt. 

Writ* today <or FREE 70 p«9* boot 
>itK compl««« date on Iha OaVry PRO " 



a 



lli'^ r> (iir|iiiraii iiiii 

111) ARMITAGE AVENUE • CHICAGO 14 

Bronchos in Naw York ond Hollywood DiHributort in pimtipol crfwi ol tha worW. 



■ m. 



PERFORMANCE CHi 

Hova Your Own Tachnicioi 
Checli The<a Key Point 

Performance factors inhe 
In DeVry Armed Forces Eq 
ment (JAN) and the D< 
"PRO" 16mm Sound Projei 

lUUMINATION IN TERMS OF LI 

OUTPUT IN LUMENS 
lOOaW, 10 kr Moldo Lomp SOC 
7S0-W, 25 hr. Moldo Lamp 33C 

rilM LIFE IN TERMS OF NUM6EI 
CIRCUITS OF TEST LOOPS Ol 
FILM WITHOUT DAMAGE 
3000 cl>cu>>i 

FILM LIFE IN TERMS OF AVERACI 
CF 10 MACHINE-MADE SPIICI 

7000 citciiili 

PROJECTED PICTURE STEADINES 
TERMS OF % OF PICTURE WIC 
AFTER SOO-HR LIFE RUN. WITH 

V»ft.col Jwmp 2^ 

Side W.oy» 7')k 

ADEQUACY OF VENTILATION IN T 

OF AVERAGE LIFE OF TEN LAM 

1000 wan. 10 Kr lomp 14 hi 

7S0 won 23 hr lamp 3} hi 

OPERATION OVER VARIATIOI 
N LINE VOLTAGE IN TERMS 
MAINTENANCE OF PROJECTC 
SPEED TO PLUS OR MINUS 1 
105 177 .ollt- 35 43 crcUi 

SOUND REPRODUCTIO 

Sound Konning>uni'ormily oF Ki 

orao in tarmt of dacibal yoriot»oi 

)0t. Tolol 

$l«odin«tt of Aim motion <n lafmt 
davtotion from tK« maon »p#«d 
faal par minvta .2% ta 

Frvquancy rvtpont* from film m 
of conformity with racommandotK 
S.M.P.T.E. coaimtn«« on townd 
ducfion for 16«lHl film canf 

Fraquancy r»ipon»« voriotion 
•ithsr Bida of f Im -«daqwola d^t 
focwi It* von 

NOISE LEVEL OF COMPLETE E< 
MENT IN TERMS OF OECIRELS t- 
FULL POWER OUTPUT OF PROJI 
AND AMPLIFIER 

60 oa 

OVERALL DISTORTION AS MEAS 
USING VARIAKIE AREA 400 I 
FILM AS TEST SIGNAL SOURCE . 
WAHS AMPtlFKR OUTPUT 
3*« Mai 

MECHANICAL NOISE OF PROJI 
OPERATING WITH FILM—] FIET 
PROJECTOR OPERATING SIDI 
TERMS OF OECIIILS AiOVI . 
STANDARD INTENSITY LEVH . . 
540* 

POWER OUTPUT OF AMPIIFIIR A 
DISTORTION— 100 TO 7000 CYa 

20 Wortt of l*t» tKo" 2'H D'iroi 

LOUDSPEAKER FREQUENCY RISP 
IN TERMS OF REPRODUCTION i 
100 TO 7000 CYCLES 
Confo'mi 

LOUDSPEAKER POWER HAND 
CAPACITY IN TERMS OF WARMI 
QUENCY INPUT SIGNALS— 700- 
CYCIIS 

35 -»"> 

LOUDSPEAKER DISTRIiUTION 45' 
AXIS- REFERRED TO ON-AXIS II 
SITY LEVEL — 700-1)00 CYCLE Wi 
SIONAl AS SOURCE 

- 3 01 




uiMisn-SH™* 



■ ■•I 



-■J- 




ONE COMPARISON PROVES BRILLIANT PREMIER 30 
AMERICA'S OUTSTANDING PROJECTOR ON 3 COUNTS 

. . . better pictures, better sound, quieter run- 
ningl Yes, compare this amazing new projector 
with them all — you, too, will discover what 
teachers, clergymen and businessmen are en- 
thused about. 

Super screen illumination now gives 30% more 
light for brilliant color projection to larger 
audiences— new Dyna-Tone Sound gives studio- 
like fidelity— and micro-mesh gears make this 
I6mm sensation the quietest on the market- 
bar Qone! 

Add to these 3 vital advantages such Ampro 
extras as new simplified threading — quick, easy 
set-up— centralized lubrication — film-saving 3 
tooth claw — feather-light tension- and you've 
got the greatest projector value ever offered! 
Mail coupon now! 

Complete with 12" Separate Speaker 
and Carrying Case 

PIAMPRO ' 

AMPRO CORPORATION Ger>*,o(Pr«,„onfqM.pm»nf Corp Subi.d.oryJ | 

8mm Cameras ond Projtctors • Slide Projectors j 

16mm 5ound-on-film • Tope Recorders | 

I 
I 



$54900 



Feature for Feature . . . Your Best Buy! 

• BRIGHTER, CLEARER PICTURES ihanks to new. faster 
imc-rniittcni — more- efficient shutter and lens. 

• QUICK, EASY SET-UP . . . Simply lift oflf lid— no ma- 
chine 10 handle or lift out of case. 

• NEW, SIMPLE TILT . . . Handy control knoh on op- 
erator's siile — <|uick!y, accurately centers picture with- 
out backlash effects. 

• IMPROVED SOUND . . . re-dcsign places lower reel arm 
on housinf; instead of sound head — eliminates reel 
disturbances from sound svstem. 



Ampro Corporation 

2835 N. Western Ave.. Chicago 18, IMinois 




Rush me FRKE illustrated literature on the new I'remier 
30 Projector with Dyna-Tone sound. BS-3-51 




SlJWC. . . 

AJdrea. 
City 



.Zone, 



. Stair 



A BUSINESS FILM REFERENCE AND RESEARCH LIBRARY AT YOl R SERVICE 

Write today for complete tletaiN on the Film Guide servitc-.^ haxe now been improved to meet >our needs. 

Library and the Business Film Bookshelf Services Addn-ss: Film Guide Library, Business Screen, 150 

available to subscribers. These economical reference E. Superior, Chicago 11. Write today— don't delay! 



N. C. F. S. Chairman McCullougl 
Long Active in Safety Fields 

♦ JlillN lildl Kit Mt.i^l I.I.OUCH 

new cliairmaii of the Natio.nai 

(;<)MMITTEE ON FiLMS FOR SaKKTY 

whiih recently announced th< 
auaril-u iiitiiiig productions of I'^.V) 
is us uid(-l\ known for his aircrafl 
engineering service to the U. S 
.\uv) and his motion picture liaison 
work f<ir the Army as he is for hie 
directorship of the technical service 
and conservation departments of 
the Vlolion Picture Association of 
.Atiicrica. 

(^)nlriliuti<iiis to safety have been 
McCulloughs forte from his Navy 
days, when he helped develop air- 
crafl e(|uipment. dynamic flight 
stabilization, engine cut-off safety 
devices, early parachute apparatus, 
and fire control in aircraft and 
ground installations. Commissioned 
a lieutenant in the Army in 1920. 
lie worked on visual aids for air- 
craft identification and was Arinv 
contact with the industry in further- 
ing a military motion picture pro- 
gram. 

He also found time in those da\- 
lo organize a system of film di.stri- 
liution li\ motor, and set up a per- 
sonnel training program for audi- 
ince safety while he was supervisor 
(if theatres for a New York circuit 

The NCFS chairman, who niaki - 
Ills home at Scarsdale, New York 
is a niemher of the SMPTE. the 
National Fire Protection Associa- 
tion and the American Legion. 

(;ee Awards Section this issue) 

Carbon Arc Supply Held Adequate 

♦ An a(l(i|uatc supph of carbons is 
assured for the foreseeable future, 
and overstocking by theaters ami 
suppliers is not justified, according: 
lo an announcement by the Na- 
noNAL Carb(»n Co.mpaxy, confirm- 
ing its statement to that effect last 
I lecember. at the time of the issu- 
ance of Copper Con.servation Order 
M-12. The new announcement was 
I'fompted by a recent news report 
of a shortage of monazite sand a^ .i 
raw material essential in the pr.- 
iluction of carbons for projectors. 
>pot lamps and other motion pit - 
ture equipment. 



AVAILABLE SOON! 

FILM PRODUCTION MANAGER 
TV or Training Films 
Background: 12 yrs. Training Films, 
still & motion picture photography, ad- 
vertising, art, public lelatioiu. and 
industrial work. 
Age 31. Draft exempt, married. 

Box 3A 

BUSINESS SCREEN 

150 E. Sufjerior St. 

Chicago 11, IlL 



20 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINK 



PROBiEMS! ^ 



btK^V^ 



osv^ 



^V^^^"''-'^ .OUa^^HG COHSUtAE^^ ^-^ Oe,,,,^ 



ATTRACTING 
DESIRABLE WORKERS 



/MP4C/- 









Si/// 



'^* SALfsMfN 



'''"y Gf>'/Vo 



ff^i 



'''^CA 






"Un, 



ce 



%/,t:^ 



f "^'N'Ns m ,„p,o.„j '"'""'"'' ''^'"'» 



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4 ADVERTISING \ 
MANA6E>? \ 



/SAIES MANAGfRh 




Remember SOUND MASTERS .... 

not only has the KNOW-HOW but also the Lnrl UU 

11 CrC S V\ VW , . . Wc are now better prepared than ever to create and produce outstanding 

motion pictures, TV shorts and slide films in the modern manner. 

Our creative staff consists of versatile specialists— our production crews, sound department, art 
department and cutting room people have a long list of outstanding film productions to their credit. 
We have done repeat business with many important clients over a long period of time. 

WHATEVER YOUR PROBLEMS MAY BE, LET US COUNSEL WITH YOU 



^m. 



Souna Jlasiciis, unc. 



165 WEST 46TH STREET — NEW YORK 19 



PHONE PLAZA 7-6600 



MOTION PICTURES 
SLIDE FILMS 
TV SHORTS AND 
COMMERCIALS 



NUMBER 2 • V O I, r M K 12 • MSI 



21 



PRODUCTION LINES 



% 



THK T\ rt»l(H( rONTRO- 
\ KRS> . anil tlu- iifWi. llial 
K.c^liiijn ix iJi-roDliiiiiint: thr 
iii.tniifji'turc t>( |>r4>frx-iuiiiil rul- 
tiliii KtMl.irlironif* hoth tn*l u>i 
1o I li i II k i I) fE aliiiul iiur own 
II 11 i (( u t* ••i*lu|i fur iinMliiriiifC 
rit I o r >li4lftilni>> and ni o I i ti n 
pii'liire>. 



On ihr T\ I iilur ar^iiiiirnl. v,v ha\f no >[ifrial a\i* lo 
grind- but ihf qiieMinn <>( KiKtai-limini* v>. Kkucliromc 
i«i onr wi-^r ktckril around u Innji lime* - in fart, wf'vc 
com*' up HJlh »onir prrlty solid tonrliisions. 



Threr* and onr-liulf )far> a^o wlicn Kktarlironu' t%a> 
a ronipiirali\ rl> nrv* prorrsN wf ^aw in it the po>- 
»ibility of '•predinfE up our optralion -- a4lniittint!, at 
ihal lintf. that it- rolor ridflit> ua^ not alt it >>l)iiiild ht>. 
TliritU):li niinifroU" tf>l-. \%t' found ur wrrv ahlf In 
UM* Kktat'hronit* for >oiiu* prod nil ion r> \% itii }:4mmI ri** 
suh!>. v*liilc nilirr lilnis, ^u^ll a^ lho!.e for SU IFT and 
COMPANY and the NATIONAI, ASSOCIATION OF 
RKTAII. (;K<M KRS. -till re.iuire-d Kodarlirom.'. be- 
raUH** of ihfir I'niplia-i" on food pluilo^rapli\ . 



9'e ttmtinufd I'ur experiments — Iryinf; lo jmd the 
proper lighting haltince. correct makeup, filter effects, 
and processing — in order lo meet the demands and al- 
low for the shortcomings of available duplicating proc- 
esses . . . and giic us desirable results in the 3Smm 

prints. 

• • * 

And \%r found llir an>H«T!». We are ready and able 
to rope with the disappearance of sheet Kodachrome 
— because we've been Ui^ing Ektachrome exclusively 
since Elasiman made it^ big improvement. In fact, we 
are convinced of the superiority of Ektachrome — 
when it i« shot and proceti^ed properly. 



.\nd wf an- also convinced of the superiority of color 
over black-and-white, for most slidehlm presentations. 
There's the factor of "ai dience identification" — in 
training films of all kinds. Your audience is more likely 
lo project them.^elves into the training situation being 
shown, if lUf people on the scr»*en look real — if they 
are photographfil in c<)Ior. 



.And there'- the important 
IDKNTIFHATION." 



factor of "PRODUCT 



Take, for example, our dealer-training slidehlms for 
ihe TEXAS COMPANY The TEXACO people have put 
a lot of thought and mon»-y into thrir redwhite-and-green 
scheme — they use it on their products, inside and out- 
side their ser\ice station-, in all thrir ads. So the>' feel 
that those colors are important in all their visual material 
to keep identification with their company and products. 



Even a pure, glos-\ white product, like the INTER- 
NATIONAL HXRVESTER refrigerators we've been 
fthooting. i- many morf lime- efffrtive in color photog- 
raphy. It'- like di-playing brilliant pearU against red 
velvet. 

• • • 

Our staff is particularly qualified for color production 
and photofcraphy and even our writrrs — because of the 
continuing and increasing demand for color slidehlms — 
think in terms of color, and urite for color. 



And hrrr'n the payofl for yon who are contemplating 
ftlidefilm programt: Oar rolor prodactions cost oar 
clients no more than black-and-white prodactionn of 
the ftame nubjert* would coi^t. 

CALL LS, AND WrLL BE HAPPY TO 



A ) DALLAS JONES 

II. 



PRODUCTIONS 
1725 North Wells Street 

Chicago 14, Illinois 



Armed Forces Communications 
Forum at Chicago's Drake Hotel 

■¥■ Aijiliii-\ i^iuil I iiMlriluiliiiM- In |iir|)iiei(liir.s9 
in till- firld^i iif |iliiitii^ra|iliv. flcclroMics iind 
win- ('i>iiiiiiiiiii<'atiiiii> uill liriii^ tuclvi' industrial 
Iriidcrs Id llic |iliil((iiiii in |iun('l diM'ii>si<ins at 
the iialiiinal ciiiivfritii>n of the Aumki) Kokces 
Co.MMl NICATIONS ASSOCIATION' at the Drake ho- 
tel in Chieago April 19 through 21. 

The aniiounreineni was made \t\ TllKolxiKE 
S. G\K^. ('(>Ti\enliiin cliuirniaii and pn-sideiil of 
the assoeiation. which is a nationwide inendier- 
ship organization of leaders of thought on pre- 
paredness in science and industry. 

The three panels will he held on the opening 
afternoon, and will I'xplore the avenues of serv- 
ice to the defense ellorl. The moderators of 
the forums are Chicago manufacturers active 
in asMH-ialion allairs. 

Special Session on Visi ai. Tkaimng 

Top-rank militarN persomiel from all the 
Services and executives of national defense 
agencies will he in attendance when President 
William C. UeVry of the DeVry Corporation as 
moderator opens the forum on photography. 
Presenting various aspects of the suhject will be 
Otto H. Coelln, Jr.. editor and publisher of 
Business Screen Magazine: Capt. William C. 
Eddy. LSN I ret.), president of Television As- 
sociates. Inc.. of Chicago: and Vere (). .Smith, 
civilian training aids specialist for the Ninth 
Naval District. 

Association members and convention guests 
will hear James H. Kellogg, president of the 
Kellogg .Switchboard and Sufiply Company, in- 
troduce the wire communications discussion. 
The speakers are Lt. Col. Kenneth M. Gonseth, 
Industrial Mobilization Rranch. Office of the 
(]hief .Signal Officer. U.S. Armv: William C. 
Henry, president and general manager of the 
Northern Ohio Telephone Company. Bellevue. 
Ohio: and M. E. Strieby, executive assistant of 
the long lines department of the American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company. 

Electronics a Key Slbject 

\n interesting and informative presentation 
of the electronics topics is assured, w ith W illiam 
J. Halligan, St., presiding. Participating will 
be Capt. Henry E. Bernstein. USN, Navy Liaison 
Officer stationed at the Signal Corps Engineer- 
ing Laboratories at Fort Monmouth. N. J.: 
Fleming W. Johnson, director of manufacturing 
of the J. P. Seeburg Corporation. Chicago; and 
John M. Sanabria. vice president of American 
Television, Inc., also of Chicago. 

Other widelv known industrialists will speak 
at the general gatherings of the convention, 
starting with the opening luncheon. Leslie F. 
Muter, past president of the Kadio Manufactur- 
ers Association, will be the chief speaker at this 
event. The annual banquet the night of April 
20 will be topped off with an address by Robert 
C. Sprague. chairman of the Kadio and Tele- 
vision Manufacturers Association. 

Conducted tours of nine ("hicago manufactur- 
ing planLs and the .Stale Civil Defense Center 
activities will be the order of the day April 20, 
and on Saturdav morning. April 21. communi- 
cations ini'luding radar and sonar, will be viewed 
in action aboard the Daniel \. Joy. I'.S. Navv 
destrover escort vessel. • 



A dull screen 

robt pictures 

of detai 




A Do'Lile screen 

makes pictures 

bright and clear 



K 



Oe Lux« 
ChallengsfS^ 



^^-^ 


/ You Improve 


'MH W^S 


• BRILLIANCE 


• DETAIL 


• CONTRAST 



when you change to 



DA-LITE 



® 



CRYSTAL-BEADED SCREENS 

If your screens are streaked, yellow with 
age, or do not hang smooth, your pic- 
tures will be dull, blurred and distorted. 
To insure perfect theatre-quality projec- 
tion, change to DaLile Crystal-Beaded 
Screens! 

Thev can make every scene 200 to .S00% 
brighter, clearer and richer in detail. 
Thev are made bv the same company 
that has been making screens for the 
finest theatres since 1909. Compare! You 
will choose DA-LITE for belter pictures 
and longer, more dependable service. 

Why Da-Li«e Screens Are Better 

A. Three opoque coo'mgi 

B. Strong non-croching, non- 
toggmg fabr« 

C. Higheit quoiity Pyroxylin 
facing 

D. Cootirtg fuiei bcadi to 
Pycosylin 

I. Do-Lit* Crystol B«odi for 
moKimwm brightnvtt 

Your Dealer Has Da-Lite Screens 
for Every Need 

Urite lor fRU. 

lompls of Dalits Cryttol-Kocdod 
icr»«rt fobric and 6-pog« brochur* 
Pronning for Eff*ctiv» Proj*ctlon" 
wKich aniw«fi many 
qu«itioni on pro- 
ieclion. 





DA-LITE SCREEN COMPANY, Inc. 

2703 N. Pulaski Road, Chicago 39, Illinois 

V\rA*r •rn<) FREE Minplr of 0«-Lite CrrMal Br«drd Mrr«oa 
Ubrir jml 6-p«gr brorhurr "PUnniDf Inr EHeciive Projpciioo." 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN M.AG.AZINE 



S^ MMt imi iim lllms 
Mm THIS sif/m 



171 MISSILES 




GUIDED lllm MISSILES are (loiiijr so m;iii\ j<»h> m» 
well, because the protlueers are specialists in 

Market iiialvsis 
Internal Relations 
Publie Relations 
Manpouer l)erelo/)/nent 

IMI Till*] NIIIJTIIh to |.n>i>lr..... ii. tl.r>.- lirl.l. thr<.u<:i. 
the vi.Mial tin(li;i . . . iimiion |iirtiiit -. -lidcfilm-. t(|f\ i«i(>n 




6108 SANTA MONICA B LV D • HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIF . GRANITE 7131 



\ 1 M lu R : • V o I. L >! t; 1 : • i « j i 



23 



^yi^, m^i. Stea^^^^ 









texAco 



p£TBC 






jaivuarV 



2$. 



195"^ 



Si;' 



Send for ti 
"A Feic Facts 
About Audio^' 






XntrodJ-^ first y ^enef^^^ 



ins 



Sfderstandatole __ ^^^^ -^lltandinS..°i^%or t 



X thii^^ ta ^g^ter un ^^^^^ can 



done . 



g and t^>J Ti on a 3°" 

^^^ ^' ,ons to yo^ ^^^ 

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ALDIO PRODUCTIOIMS, I IM C 

PRODI CERS OK MOTION PICT I RES 
630 MNTH AVENUE • IIIM CENTER H I I I. D I N G • NEV YORK. N.Y. 



24 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINK 



A SPECIAL REVIEW OF FILM PRODUCTION RESOURCES AND ACHIEVEMENT IN SPON SORED FILMS 

kk Vmm lor llic Film Itiivcr 

THIS MKHIl M'S (;R()WIN(; STATIRE AND VI DIKNCE IS SAFEGUARDED HV IM{CiJ)l CTIO.N STANDAHDS 



TIIK I II.M ITSK.I^K is llif miasuri- 1)> 
uliii'li uli phases of this (actual iihn in- 
I dustry must inevitably be judged. Great 

achievement in terms of original concepts, well- 
conceixeil and <apal>l\ execuled pictures, grow- 
ing leihnical perfection in color, lighting, and 
camera effects . . . these are the solid funda- 
mentals on which the medium of sponsored 
motion pictures, whether for Governmental ob- 
jectives or prixate industrv. is achieving greater 
stature among its audiences. These, the people 
who nntch our /ilrns ami benefit from them, are 
our real judges and juries. 

Their phenomenal growth in the I . S. must 
be recorded first and foremost. The sobering 
fact that a single sponsored motion picture cur- 
rentU showing llnfinished Kiiiiihoits) has ap- 
proximated .■?().()( )(!.()( to \iewers to date is of 
the utmost immediati- importance. At the 2().- 
0()().(HKJ audience mark, the lale Douglas B. 
Hoblis of the Alumirmm Companv of America 
rep<>rle<l of this film: 

Co.MPARE This With Other Media 
"To date, including production cost, print 
cost, distribution cost, and all other expenses 
which can be charged directiv against this pii- 
ture . . . we have spent more than 8250.1MKI. 
On a cost-per-person-seeing basis the picture's 
cost has been between one anil one-half cents 
and one ami three-quarters cents. We consider 
this a very low figure when we know thai we 
have had the undivided attention of each person 
seeing the picture for thirty-seven minutes." 

Within a few re<ent months, this industry has 
wilnesseil ihc premieres of new sponsored fdms 
anil film shoiiinii terhnii/urs. uilli boundless 
audience potetilialilics. that millions upon mil- 
lions of Americans will invite into their churches, 
clubs, lodge and grange halls, labor temples, 
communit) forums an<l sthoids. Titles such as 
Hi/: I lieu. This Is Life, .■tmeriran ('ouho\. and 
//I Our Hands, to name just a few. ari' the real 
instruments of our destiny. 

TiiinsvMis «>K \e« Ai i)IKn< ks Mkntmi.y 
So this medium widens its place in the Ameri- 
can s<'ene, nurtured by and nurturinf; the con- 
stant flow of thousands of new 16nun sound 
motion picture projectors which mo\e out of 
I . S. pr<-cision plants each fi'w months into ihc 
hands of olher thousands of thus "sj-lf-eipiippeir 
audienci-s in communities. The extravagant esti- 
mate of 2IM).IMM) Ifimm sound proji-ctors in the 
hands of such grou|>s and institutions grows 
modest inileed as indiistr\ il«elf eijuips its rufe- 
lerias and recreation renliTs for nocm-hour 
Worker showings of llie«e fdms: as thousand* 
upon thousands of chur<'he> of all denominations 
and creeds increase their own parlieipniion in 



the audi<i-visual field: as state legislatures enact 
las in California) million-dollar budgets for 
the statewide equalization of audio-visual fa- 
cilities in their schools. 

rill- liny seed id professional status for the 
au<liii'\ isual cxecutixe within industrs becomes 
a sturdy, growing plant as the membership of 
the Industrial Audio-Visual Association steadily 
increases. National and regiimal attention to the 
sponsored film is drawn bv the growing number 
of voluntary and often un-anticipated judgings 
and awards. Film festivals, the Freeilom 
Awards, the FiNANcui. Wori.k "Oscars." public 
relations honors and screenings, and the annual 
selections of the National Committee on Films 
for Safety give both stature and in<enlive to 
better sponsored films. 

I'KIM I'l HCHA.SE.S F{eflect Growtii 
We measure progress in solid facts like the 
cash-b>r-prints expendituri-s laid down by com- 
peting companies for a sponsor's far-sighted 
and meritorious contribution in the film Miracle 
in I'aradise I alley. Or bv the thousands of 
prints purchased of the simple but highly essen- 
tial training film The Micrometer. Take note, 
IIoIIn wiiod. of the growing stature of this un- 
heralded and unsung cousin which now has 
numerous subjects in circulation with five hun- 
dred or more prints in dailv us«'I 

The iharacter id the induslr\ which s|iocializes 
in the creation and crafting <d these most useful 
tools of communiiation is the point of this Re- 
port on Production, which we have lalu'lled this 
first annual review id I'riiim ( thin Kesoi rc e.s. 



r« 


9 s ' 






1 'mA 


\y^ 


i! 







What are it.s attribule». its physical characterin- 
lics, its geography? And what of its reputation? 
From pages .ST to .56 of this issue you can 
di-rive lhes«- basic facts: 

1. Though there are literals hundreds o( 
pro<lucer "names" listed in the telephone and 
city directories of metroptditan I . S. cities, the 
most thorough survey of all known concerns so 
listed has returned minimum essential data on 
just till production compani)-« in the etitirc 
I . S. Four others filed incomplete returns. 

2. This is b\ no means a reflation on the 
unlisted or incompletely listed companies. We 
are not the Internal Revenue Department and 
the return of these information forms is entirely 
a democratic and voluntary gesture on the part 
of lhos4- who did so. 

.H. Some abs«-ni-es. however, have made a 
neat pile of cancelled survey envelopes marked 
in that final and conclusive Post Office r«'d which 
states "Moved I^ft No Addri-ss" or "I nknown 
At This Address" or even "Fraudulent Mail to 
This Address Keturne<l by Order of Postmaster 
General." 

Listings Indicate Estabusiied Firms 
1"he "weeding out" of thos<- who infest the 
fringes of this growing and fruitful field of en- 
deavor is an editorial responsibility and an un- 
<Iuestioned s«'rvice both to the sponsor and to 
the i|ualified producer. By keeping an open 
mind, fed bv <l«vp wells of ex|wrience through 
more than two deiades of |M-rsonal and profes- 
sional experience dire<tlv within this ine»lium. 
we pledge the improvement of this admittedly 
crude and incomplete Itrginning on an essen- 
tial task. 

Kill vou cannot take anvthing away from the 
clear ev itience of goiMl faith and fair intention 
which is evideiu-«'il in the fads provideil bv the 
101 I'. S. companies who re|Mirle«i the detail* 
asked of them. To them ami to the nine (Una- 
dian companies whov returns were ri-eriveil in 
time for inclusion we express the giHHiwill and 
gratitude of ihousands «d pri>»|>eitive «|Miii»ors 
who will Im- aide«l by their eoo|>erali»n. 

Iiir VrTRiiiiTts <>» This Imustrv 
Most (ranklv. the assembling of these priMlurer 
re*«ouriTi« has the as|ie«-| of "industry" stature. 
W illi a few exceptions, we feel that there i« gm- 
nine /iniinriW rrsftan.ubilily inherent among the 
majorilv of the«<- ■••m|uiiiie«. 1'hal •ignifiranl 
faci was not oskcii bv u* but it should l>e by 
anv exet-uiive charged with film prtMurenirnl. 

B\ and large, this industry is physirally u-rll- 

rquifi\xd to Ho the l\ pe nf piclurrt iihirh its 

■ml mrmlxn hate Itern domz. n»e«e 

' '<•■ largelv inlerrejaleil in term* of ex|>eri- 

enrr and qualifications. As our own aulhorila- 



NfMBER 



• \ Ol I M K 1 : • 19 5 1 



2S 



A (lu'd-LisI for Prodiurr and Sponsor 
Kes|)(insil)ili(y in \k Prodnclion of \lolion Piclnres 

The coinprehpiiiiivr oulliiip below uas |irr(mriMl li\ a s|)Ciinl Suh-Cointiiiltee on 
Sponsor-I'rodurer l{rs|ioMsiliilities as a projcil of llic Films (lointiiltti'c of the 
Association of Nalional AdviTtisers. The full ('oo|><Tation of i'slal)lislii><l produc- 
ers of business films helped formulate llic curiipiclc report of which il \\a> a p.irt. 



' THE SFH)\S()KS KKSPONSIHII.ITIES 
I. I'i.wmm; 

I. Keco-'Mize Need for a Film. 

2. Define the Objectives. 

3. Determine the Audience. 
\. Define the Content. 

5. Obtain Necessary Hudpet. 

6. Select the Producer. 

II. ScRIlT 

1. (.ontrait for Script or for Scri))! and 
Production. 

2. Centralize Liaison Responsibilitv . 

■'.. Facilitate Working Mclati.niships with 
Producer. 

4. SuppJN Technical and Policy Informa- 
tion. 

5. Establish Internal Approval Machinery. 
(>. Pay for Script. 

III. Prodlction 

1. Contract with Producer for Production. 

2. Supply Liaison Representative. 

3. Supply Technical and Policy Advice. 

4. Approve Production Details. 

5. Provide Special Products and Equip- 
ment. 

6. Make Internal Photographic Arrange- 
ments. 

7. .Adopt Reasonable Schedules and Dead- 
lines. 

8. Arrange Approval Showings. 

9. .Make Progress Payments. 

10. Pay for Extra Services Requested. 

11. Assume Partial Financial Responsibility 
if film is not .Acceptable. 

12. Insure Negative after Delivery. 

IV. Prints 

1. Contract for Printing. 

2. Laboratory Arrangi-nients. 

3. Care of PrinLs. 

\. I)|s|Kllll TIO\ 

1. Arrange for Distribution. 

2. Arrange for Good Proje<-tion. 
.3. Maintain Attendance Rc'c ords. 
I. Prepare Promoticjnal .Material. 

'InlrndufUirr outlln* u> lh» 11 pac» rn»«rt of 
rn>« Ihf AtwrlAllon uT NatlcMUt A'lTTtUvi, 



THE PKODl CER'S RESPO.NSimLITlES 
I. Pi.\\M\<; 

1 . Study Sponsor's Prol)lems. 

2. Offer Professiotial Experienc-e and Ad- 
vice. 

3. Show Samples of Past Work. 

!•. Provide Evidence of Organizational 
(^ompclence and Stability. 

•i. If Requested, Suggest Oullino or Syn- 
opsis. 

6. If Requested. Provide Preliminary Re- 
search. 

7. Make Price Estimates if Requested. 

II. Sclill'T 

1. (.ontracl for Script or for .Script and 
Production. 

2. Develop Basic Film Concept. 

3. Supply Professional Film \^'riler. 

4. Supply Research Personnel. 
.5. Supply Film "Treatment". 

(>. Supply Satisfactory Original Shooting 

Script. 

III. Prodlctiov 

1. Contract with Sponsor for Production. 

2. Assume (iomplctc Production Responsi- 
bility. 

3. Arrange Approval Showings at Desig- 
nated Intervals. 

4. Make Corrections as Necessary. 

5. Absorb Cost of Corrections which are 
Producer's Responsibility. 

6. Deliver Fine Grain Negative and Test 
Print. 

7. Deliver "(Jut-Takes" to Sponsor, if Re- 
quested. 

8. Arrange Copyright for Sponsor. 

9. Advise Spon.sor on Use of Films in Tele- 
vision. 

10. Arrange for Foreign Rights, if Desired. 

11. Deliver Final Recording Script. 

12. Insure Negative During Production. 

IN . Prints 

1. Supply Prints. 

2. Maintain Proper Storage and .Mainte- 
nance of Negative. 

\. DiSTRIBI TION 

1. Provide Distribution Service (or Advise: 
ed. I if Requested. 

2. Provide Supplementar\ Promotional Ma- 
terial, if Requested. 

thr •amc CItIr «vstlal>lr ic SI. 00 per ca%n 

;«,■; Uadliuo Atriuc, .\e« Yu*k 17. N. V. / 



26 



( ( o.NTi.M Ki» moM rm; i-kkcedinc page) 

live sui ation of the .Navy's film procurcmen 

system rcvc-alcd. you do not ask a producei 
without animation experience or animatioi 
i-c|nipmcnt to do a film wholly consisting of ani 
maliciii. Experience, and recent cxpcricnct 
measured b\ the screening of submittc-d lilms 
is a fuiulamcntal factor in the consiclcralion ol 
each procluccr. 

Till- i>rniiaiiriil pcrsunnel available to the pro- 
ducer for the execution of your assignment b 
indicated but not always self-evident in these 
listings. It is not apparent unless we defined 
the complete departments in such sizeable con- 
cerns as Audio. (Caravel. The Jam Handy Or 
ganization. Wilding. Wolff, etc. but these exist 
and their benefits are evident in the broad range 
of services and numbers of films which such 
experienced concc-rns annualK provide. Our own 
advertising j)agc"s further reflect the stature of 
many of thc-se companies, supplementing the in- 
formative data reports. 

There are most certainly great differences in 
the kind and <|ualit\ of the pictures turned out 
l)\ llic.-c companies. These dilfcrc-nces cciunt 
very importantly when product is dcstinc-d for 
national u.sc- and broad public viewing. They 
count less when the material is intended and 
biulfieled for purely regional or internal pur- 
poses. We are satisfied that there is a propor- 
tionately greater number of capable producers 
listed in these twenty pages than in any similar 
lislini: so far in existence in this country. Pro- 
tected by the safeguards of his own careful 
validation (via the basic steps in good film buy- 
nianshij) provided in this issue) of each prospec- 
tive prccduccr's c|ualifications. there is a great 
deal of basic information jirovided here for the 
prospective sjjonsor. 

So.viE Basic Factors of Experience 
All 29 of the companies initially surveyed by 
Business Screen during the latter phases of 
World War II are included in this review. These I 
are the coinjianies who were ri^sponsible for tli' 
production of 3.747 different reels of war train 
ing films by 1945. Twenty-one of these same- 
companies had turned out a total of 1.535 reels 
for the U. S. Navy (and many are still doing 
' sol : the\ were responsible for the production of 
457 training films for the I nitecl States Olhc- 
of Kducalion program: and by 1945 they had 
produced 1.532 reels of essential films for l". S. 
war industries. 

The untold thousands of reels of films turned 
out by these cxpc-ric-iiced hands since that dale 
lend emphasis to the constantK repeated ad- 
vantage of Em'ERIence available- to the prospec- 
tive sponsor. It also reminds us that, for some 
concerns, experience can become a millstone of 
tradition and stodginess. The buver ne<-d not 
fear creative originalitv. freshness of viewpoint, 
and technical brilliance. These are equallv rilal 
to the film: c-\pcrience is the- kind of |)oslti\c- 
forcc- which can make them more dependably 
possible and less expensive. In any event, pres- 
ent financial responsilnlity and recent experi- 
ence remain positive check-points for the bu\c-r. 

Of Geoch^piiv WD Reput.ation 

These twci subjects are unrelated: geography 
and reputation. They are related here only in 
summation, for the I'. S. has a satisfying geo 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




U. S. (,0\EK\MENT STANDARDS 
for Ihr l^rociin'iiK'iil of Motion PicUires 

(;i IDWCK FOK III! I ll.M -^IMiN^oi} IN TIIJ N \ \ '^ "< lU "^INC MMMtOVCII 



phicul ■■spri'ad" i>f experienced companies. 
For ri-fjiona! needs, there are producers in vir- 
tually every populated section of the I . S. and 
in every sifiiilar province of Canada. These pro- 
ducers tiiiiN often provide useful location serv- 
ices, anions one another, and for sjioiisors re- 
(piiring such s|K'cial assistance. In oilier lases. 
there are jiosilive adxantages in entrusting a 
nationwide project to a single national concern. 

AUKQI ATE S(>IR( ES FOR GOVERNMENT NeEDS 

Hut in the F^ast, the South, the Midwest. South- 
west, Mountain States, and on the West Coast, 
a good and sulllcient nund>er of capahic hands 
■re reaii\ to lake on the needs of Government 
and Industry. // is most certainly evident from 
this Reiicu- that there is no need to set up new 
produrtion resources, duplicatinp scarce techni- 
.// personnel, for any national fiovernment pro- 
■ 'lion purpose, with all these concerns avail- 
able to lend their experience, physical plants, 
and proven security reputations to the needs of 
our country in either war or peacetime. 

Reputation is the great intangible, made far 
less so in this Instance by the very "product 
of these studios. "\U their WDrks. \e shall know 
them" is the paraphrase that aptK desirilics the 
business. fa( tual. training and educational film 
production industry "covered" in this first an- 
nual review. It is no coincidence that almost 
ever\ known film of i|ualitv now generally <'ir- 
rulating in the <'ounlr\. the great majority of 
niilitar\ and inilustrial trainitig films and lech- 
nitfues. and the hulk of physical resources and 
manpower in this industry can be traced to one 
or another of the 1(11 companies listed in these 
pages. 

The Film.s They Make Jidce Them 
"By their works" now and in the future, ad- 
vertising, inilustr>. trade groups. Go\criunenl 
and all suih users of thi- factual film will know 
and judge this business, lielter films, made pos- 
sible hy wise sponsors, can enormously increase 
the already great potential of the medium in 
American lifi-. Thes*' companies have the man- 
power to ilo them. I.el us also ho|«- and trust 
(hat they have the willpower to convince spon- 
sors that they should be allowed to do them as 
ihey know Ix-st. In that event, the sponsor will 
profit by an even greater share of the millionfold 
audiencen or more responsive trainees or 
whatever the chosen objective of lii« films may 
be. The extent of the film's contribution to the 
experience or need of its audience is the kcy- 
sl«me of the entire medium. The sponsored film 
has made such contributions in recent months, 
with both honor and profit to sponsors and 
with real .ind hisling U-nefits In the millions who 
have shared lliein. • 



* In the previous volume of HlstNES.s ScREEN 
I Number 7 of Volume II. I'i.Sdl our Washing- 
ton correspondent pri-scntcd the essential fads 
as pro\ided us In the Training Film Division 
of the Department of the .Nav\ on the procure- 
ment of films. Kditorially, we said: 

"In selecting the Navy's procurement system 
to des<ribc ... it appears to be model; its fea- 
tures. howe\er, are enibodli-d in all Govern- 
ment film procurement, and the same steps may 
well be employed in each approach." Here are 
those steps, reprinted for emphasis on the stand- 
ards which are implicit for the producer of 
training films, whether for Government or pri- 
vate industry, or any trade group, or advertis- 
ing agency. They are also to lie noted with 
care as a guide to prospective sponsors of suc- 
cessful films s»-ekiiig similar services in the 
field. I Kd. note: the italics are ours, for just 
such guldan<e. I 

These Are Steps for the Bidder 

In a letter in triplicate, addressed to the Chief. 
Bureau of Aeronautics. Department of the Navy. 
Viasblngton 25. D. C. I Attention Aer-f'h-al. 
state the following: 

1. Give a resume of your organization, in- 
cludinii type and brief history, and state whether 
you are a corporation, a partnership, or sole 
proprietor, 

2. ."state that you an- Interested in iloing 
Navy motion picture work and the type that you 
consider yourself best suited to handle. This In- 
formation givi's the procurement ofliier a bctti-r 
understanding -jf your capabilities and the kind 
of work on which to give you an opportunity 
to bid. 

If \ou are one of hundreds on a list. It isn't 
ver\ prai'llialile to ask \ou to bid on a film 
which will employ tcchnli|ues In which you are 
not experienced. If a film is to consist largely 
of animation, do you have an animation stand ':* 
Ni'ither is it practicable, if \ou are on the ^ est 
Ci>ast, to ask \ou to bid on a small job for which 
Norfolk will be the lination, 

3. List your key personnel and give a brief 
outline of their experience in motion picture 
work. 

4. Stall- the major tyf>es of facililiet and 
equipment tinned or how made available to vour 
conipan\. No one insists that \ou own outright 
a studio capable of produilng (iimr If ilh the 
U ind. No one will look aokance nt your having 
sound recording done in a studio established for 
that piir|M>se. But if the major |M>rtion of your 
eipiipmcnl Is not owned, vou are in effect not 
in the motion picture business. 

FlNAMIAI. St*BIUT\ a KtA F*l.TOH 

5. F.ncjosr a balance sheet listing your assets 
an<l liabilities. The amiable Scot, W. B. Mr- 
Ijtren, who hn« l>rrn in charge of the Navy's 
motion picture procurement desk for the \uut 



eight years, s|>ent five years of his life as a se- 
curity analyst and knows h<iw to read a balance 
sheet. In other words, ilon't show under " \ss«-ls" 
a sole cash item of $-l.lKNI and an ei|uall\ sole 
item under "Liabilities" of "Bank loan, S-L1H)0." 
The .Navy does not pay in advance and the Gov- 
ernment cannot sponsor you in business. 

Neither a maximum nor a minimum is us«-d 
as a criterion. It does mean that the emphasis 
is upon the word "sound." 

Recent Film.s Mu.st Be Sibmitted 

6. Forward samples of pictures recently pro- 
duced by your compam. preferably educational 
or training films. Mere the emphasis is upon 
the word "recently." for this rea.son: let's say 
that you made a film when you were working as 
u producer-director for the LMN Company. 
Maybe it even won an award of some kind. Rut 
while you were working for LMN vou had 
plenty of time in which to Ih- ireative. lacked 
hy a large sales staff, vou didn't have to worry 
about bringing in new business, .\ large admin- 
istrative section looked after all the housekeep- 
ing details, like paying the telephone bill: niayl>e 
you even had two secretaries but they weren't 
on your payndl. The Naw wants to know if 
you can produce a picture of the same quality 
when you are wearing six hats and using your 
own capital. 

A Summary of the Key Points 

In a brief resume of |hes«' points, note that 
the emphasis is on these basic qualities: 1 1 1 ex- 
|>erience I and the kind of experience I ; 1 2 1 key 
personnel anil their exfH-rience: 1,3 1 physical 
facilitii-s, in terms of owned e<|uipment: 1 41 
financial stability: and i.Sl the films you have 
produced and for whom. 

It is no coincidence that the listing of pro- 
ducers in this Review Issue of I'Roni ( TION 
RE.sotR(:(>i follows sui'h an outline to a large 
degrif. It is the s|Minsor's responsibility to fill 
in any ini.ssing portions of especial importance 
to his organization, such as crrdil references In 
establish financial res|ionsibilitv. 

We do not emphasi/c geographical advantages, 
other than to point out. as the Naw does, that 
certain kinds of physical work naturally gravi- 
tate to the most convenient qualified sourre. 
But it is equally important to note, as all pro- 
ducers Would emphatically agnt*. that national 
asslgiimcnts invoUing ■ onsiderable distani'ro 
and lixation work ha\r no such Iwiundaries, that 
Kastcrn, Midwestern, or Western ciim|Minir« »« 
listed. Work over a considerable geographical 
area and. in fact, the largest of them maintain 
excellent service offices to render such service 
more economically and more eHicientlv for such 
client.*, their branch or regional offices. 

The business film s|H>nsor can profit by the 
criteria set forth above l» which thousands of 
films have lieen acquire^l bv the Navy in recent 
years. It's a giHMl safe road. • 



M M H KK 



\ Ol.t M K 1 : • 1 OSl 




First Mkdai. Award: Vknice 
Sponsor: AMU'ri<at\ Caiufr Society 
Producer: Audio Productions. Inc. 



NAVAL 

IN SCIENCE 



First Medai- Award: Venice 
.Sponsor: United States Navy 
Producer: DeFrenes Company 




Internalioiial Feslivals Honor Films 

l\<:i!l \SIN(. IS. PMMICIPMION M K DI.NHlKt.ll \M) \ K.MCK EXHIBITIO.NS 



WOKI.I) l,\ri;i{i:.ST in the fa.lual (ilrri is 
expressed in the increasing nutn- 
liiTs of film festivals held 
aipiiuid each x<-ar. In 1'>.SI af;ain. 
ihi- Fifth inlernalional Kdiii- 
luiii;li I' ilni Festival ttill lake 
place from August 19 to .Sep- 
lemher <>. The XIII Inter- 
national Kxhihition of 
Cinematographic Art will 
he hehl at Venice. Ital\ 
during the same late sum- 
mer period. At both focal 
centers of interest abroad 
in realistic films. United 
States product can and is gain- 
ing greater acceptance. Some ( 
these awards are reproduced on this 
page — others worthy of mention are Louisi- 
ana Story's showing at Edinburgh in 1948: the 
first prize medal award (see inset I given Audio 
I'rcxiuctions for Cancer — The Problem oj Early 
Diagnosis iti the medical and scientific film divi- 
sion of the Venice Festival in 1949. 

Mr. Joseph DeFrenes of the Philadelphia 
studios bearing his name was the proud recipient 
(if two silver medals and an hi>n(iralile mention 
award for three prize-winning films in two suc- 
cessive Venice Festivals. The 194J> first-prize 
winning DeFrenes-produced picture was Naval 
I'hotoiiraphy in Science: the film Endodontia 




Si'ELiAi. Mi.DAi, Award: Vemck 

Sponsor: United States Navy 

Producer: Associated .Screen News. Ltd. 




(Root Canal Therapy) won a gold medal in the 
following vear: the film Periodontia w 
(Warded honorable mention. All 
hree pictures were U. S. Navy 
training films produced under 
the supervision and control 
of the U. S. Naval Photo- 
graphic Center, Anacostia. 
Tanfileuood. a Department 
of State film produced by 
M I'O Productions was 
honored at Kdinburgh last 
year. .Special mention i» 
also due General Mills* 
School Thai Learned to Eat, 
exhibited at Kdinburgh: and 
udge (Crawley's Loon's Secklace, 
which won both a silver medal at 
Venice and an International Award at 
Fdinburgh in the same year. • 




Title: ■•'riie SchonI Thai l.iarncd to Hal" 

Si'EciAi. Mkdai. Aw vud: Kdimu ri.ii 

Sponsor: General Mills. Iri<-. 

Producer: Educational Film I'roduilion Service 



Special Award: Edimuiroh 
Sponsor: I'. S. Information Service 
Producer: MPO Productions, Inc. 

The Canadian Film .4wards 
■*■ A recent innovation are the annual Canadian 
Film Awards in that country. A Crawley Film 
for Molsons Breweries. Ltd.. was cited as the 
best conwncrcialK sponsored film in 1950 ( see 
below I : other Canadian producers and the Na- 
tional Film Board of Canada shared top awards, 
the latter with such titles as The Prufi Addict. 
Feelinii itj Hoslilily. and K ho If ill Teach Your 
Child, Saje Clothing (also a U.S. safety winner I. 



ROOT'CAMAL 




Special Citation: Venice 
Sponsor: United Stales Navy 
Producer: DeFrenes Company 




Special Awards: Venice. Edinburgh 

Producer: Crawlev Films. Limited 

Distributor: Encyclopaedia Britanniea Films. Inc. 




FiR.sT Medal: Canadian Film Awards 
.Sponsor: Molson's Breweries. Ltd. 
Producer: Crawlev Films. Limited 



^ Annual Freedoms Fonndadon Awards 
Are Presented for Sponsored PicUires 

TWELVE ()UTSTAM)IN(; l«>5(l I'K«M;|{\M> lil-CIIXK MIDM.s. (.\v|| v\\ AKDS 



ll 



THE SECOND ANM AL Eree.loms Foun- 
dation Awards were presented on Wash- 
inpton's Hirtliday. Fehruary 22. l')51 at 
Valley Forpc. f'etiiisvivania. General Oniar N. 
Bradley, Chairman of the Joint ("tiiefs of Staff. 
|MTSonalK presented llie highest awards in spe- 
cial ceremonies held on this historic site, honor- 
ing those indiyiduals and companies who had 
made "outstandinp contributions to freedom 
.luring 195(1." TweKe sponsored motion picture 
|iriigrains and six other e<hicational motion pic- 
lures recciyed medals and cash awards at this 
and other Freedoms Award ceremonies which 
fill lowed. 

The co-sponsored Borg-Warner and Irdaiiil 
Sirel Company eeonomii' education program In 
Our Hands was the first place winner in the 
16mm motion picture classification, receiving the 
L'nld medal award and a cash prize of S1.5()0. 
W ilding Picture Productions. Inc. produced this 
ciiiplnyee program. 

In second place was the National Association 
..| Manufacturers" sponsored film Jor Turner. 
Imeriran. produced by Apex Film Corporation, 
sharing third place honors were three Wilding- 
produced films. Proof Throtiiili lite \ii:ltt. [)ro- 
duced for the Nash Motors Diyision of Nash- 
Kelvinator ('or|)oration : ./ Closed Hook, pro- 
duced for the Farm Bureau Insurance Companies 
of Cidumhus. Ohio: and Unseen Horizons, pro- 
duced for the Ohio Oil Company, tf'illi These 
Hands, powerful human documentary produced 
by Promotional Films for the International 
Ladies Cartnent Wdrki-rs I nion was another 
third place witmer. 

Raphael G. Wolff .if lliill\wood receiyed the 
Freedoms Foundation Awards directly in a We-st 
Coast ceremon\ held last month for his self- 
sponsored picture on the fundamental economics 
of advertising titled The Mapic Key. In the 
fourth place categor\ also was C. L. Venarcl's 
production of The Shadow of d Pioneer f«>r the 
Keystone .Steel & Wire ('ompany of Peoria. Illi- 
nois. Another Wolff productiim The Human 
Bridpe earnetl the Ford Motor ('ompanx a medal 



and cash award. Tomorrow's Leaders, a 4-H 
Club subject produced by Allis Chalmers' Tra<'- 
tor Division in cooperation with Chicago Film 
.Studios was the final award winner in this 
classification. Jack Wade of \llis Chalmers 
supervised the program. 

The l'J50 Awards Jury for the films was 
headed by Dr. Milton S. Eisenhower, president 
of Pennsylvania State ('ollege. as chairman. 
Other mend)ers induiled fnur stati- su|)ri'ine c<iurt 
justices, the national commandi'rs of ihc Marine 
Corps League, the .Militar) Order of the Purple 
Heart, the Legion of Guardsmen, the American 
Legion Auxiliary, the American War F^ads. the 
\merican (iold Star Mothers. Inc.. and the Jew- 
ish War Veterans. 1{. K<-lyiii Shivers. (>residcnt 
of Civitan International and Lawrence J. Gib- 
bons, vice-president of Optimist International 
were other members of the Awards Jury. 

The Fifth Freedom, a 33nun theatrical motion 
picture, was the only sponsored film to win hon- 
ors in that classification. Mode Art Pictures of 
Pittsburgh, through its president James Baker. 
received third pla<i- medal and cash awards for 
that contribution. 

Sound slidefilms have no special place in the 
Freedoms Awards but the color sound slidefilm 
serio produced and sjninsored by Boss Koy. jni'. 
of Detroit un<ler the general title Land of the 
Free received highest second place honors in the 
General Awards ilassificati<m. Also re<-eiving 
honors in this classification with an Honor Medal 
\ward was The Fourth Man. another sound 
slidefilm. produced l» Swank Films of Da>ton. 
Ohio. This program was sponsore<l by a Mil- 
waukee manufacturer. 

The "first award" winner of last year's com- 
petition was F.nlerprise. the stor\ of the i-conoinic 
reciiM-lruction nf a small Southi-rn town pro- 
duced by (uiravel Films for (iluett. Peabody. 
Titles of other l")5<) and P)l') award winners 
are reproduced on the following page of this 
issue. Arrangements can In- made to obtain 
nearl\ all of the winni-rs froni sponsors an<l 
their distributors. InVKKI 




AWA R I) S 
SECTION 

Ol lU SI.NESS SCRKF.N'S 
REPORT ON PROUICTION 

if Thousands of our fellow VmiTiians 
have paiil tribute to the sponsored film 
in recent )ears, M-r\ing as mendwrs of 
awards juries for whiih thry were 
chosen as i|ualified exjH'rls or as persons 
with resix-cted judgment. 

More than an> thing els<'. the title 
fratMe> re|iroduced in thes«- nine page» 
reflect the \er> real contribution which 
sponsored films are making in many 
essential fields of human endeavor and 
ni>ed. On iM'half of thoM- sponsors and 
producers whose efforts have U-i-n ac- 
knowledged, and for all who ha\e In-nr- 
fited b\ the raisi-d -tandanU of content 
and technical ijualit) which these com- 
petitions have hel|>ed to bring about, 
we express the di-ep gratitude of the 
industry we si-rve to all tho»«> ri-s|Min- 
sible for and s«'r\ing in the \wards 
Programs mentioneil here. 

To our own indu.Mry »pons«>r» and 
pro«lu<Trs alike we sa\ "stride for 
greater |ierfe«-|ion and the grralrr serv- 
ice which is impli<-d in the great ma- 
jority of films honoreil in thex- |Mige9." 
- The Editor 




FlHST MHIM \» MIO WiNNKK (l').T(ll 

Sponsors: Borg-Warner i <•. ami lidaml Steel ('<>. 
Proilucer: Wilding Picture Produitions, Inc, 




l^iitsT Mnui. \«\ki>Wi>m;h i I'^l'Jt 

.SiHiiiMir: ('luell. PralM>d\ & ('oin|i«n\ 

Prmluifr: C«rn»el Films. Inc. 




MJ) m 



Spf.ci*l Mr.OAi. A«*Ki> Wi>>kh (SSFl 
Sponsor: Rom Hoy. Inc, 
Producer: Hov> Ko>. Inc, 



Spuiisorvtl l-'iliiis l( //; Hkhihs: 




M c ilMl Ml l>M. \u Mill 

S|iiiiiM>i-: NiUional Asr-n. of M.iiiufiu lurcrs 
I'riiclui rr: Vpi-x Film (lorpuralidn 




I'olKTll MlDAl. Aw Altl) 

Spoiisors: All Clubs arul Organizations 

Producer: Ka|>liael G. Wolff Studios 



THROUGH 



TlllHI> Ml.llM. \\\ Mili 

SpoiiMir: Nash I)i\.. Nash-kcK iiialor Ci>r|). 
Producer: Wilding Picture Productions. \\u 



mm^ 



lol Kill Mi;OAI. Aw AKI> 

Sponsor: Ford Motor Company 

Producer: Raphael C WolIT Studios 




I iiiKit Mkkai, AWAHII 

>ponsor: (thio Oil (!oni|ian\ 

Producer: Wilding Picturi- Pnxluclions. Inc 



I- (II urn Mkdal Aw AKi) 
Sponsor: Allis-Chalniers Mfg. Co. ( Tractor Div. I 
('o-l'roihicers: Allis-Chalnwrs & Chicago Film 



Freedom Awards: 



FlHSr SKLKCIIONS l\ IVIV 

if I lie annual Freedoms lounilalion Auards! 
were inaugurated in V)V) f<ir the hroail range 
of cornnninicalion>. in which Kimm and '{.Sinni 
films tti're considered to pla\ a highl) important 
part. Though no .'{5tnm auards were made in 
that year. Cluetl. Peahod) and Company's En- 
tiT prise (see previous page) won first prize 
honors. Seven other pictures represented on 
lliex' jiages shared the generous cash auards 
(uhich uent to their sponsors! and the prized 
medals. General "ike" Eisenhower, as president 
of Columbia University, presided at the first for- 
mal awards ceremony. • 




Skio.M) Mkiim. \w viui 

."sponsor: Harding College 

Producer: John Sutherland Pr<iiluctions. Inc. 



LETTER 
TOABEBQ 



TlllUK MiDM. \w VUI) 

.•sponsor: Natl, .'^mall Hus. Kron. Foundation 
Producer: KkO-Palhe. Inc. 





Title: "With These Hands" 

Third Mkdai. Award 

Sponsor: Intl. Ladies Garment Workers Lnion 

Producer: Promotional Films. Inc. 



FoiRTii Mkdai, Award 

.Spon.sor: Keystone Stei-I & Wire (iompany 

Producer: The Venard Organization 



Spkciai. Mkdai, Awahu 

.Sponsor: Murroughs Adding Machine Co. 

Producer: W ihling Picture Productions. Inc. 



II 



A LETTER 



from 
AMERICA 



Si'KClAI. MkDAI. \\\ \ltl( 

^[lonsor: (ioodvcur Tin- & IIuMmt ( j>iii|iaii\ 
I'mdiiiiT: \\ ililiii" I'ii tun- I'miliK liiiii~. Iiic , 




Si'i.i 1 \i. Mkdai. Aw \iii) 

Sponsor: Dodge I)iv.. Chrysler Cor|i. 

Priidurer: \\ ildiii" I'i<turr I'rixlui limis. Iin 




^i'l c I M \If l>M. \\\ M!ll 

S|iiiiisiir: Natl. Assn. of Mamifai liin-r- 
I'rodiiriT: \|M-\ Film ('.(ir|ii)ratioii 



OF THIS IDE 
ARE PROUD 



.•^I'K I M. Mkdvi. Aw \h\> 

Sponsor' Kelxinalor Div.. i\a.<>h-Krlvinalor Corp. 

I'r...lu.vr: Hapha.-I (",. \\.,\n Siti.li... 



Film Festivals Provide Award Juries 

CLKVKI.AM)- \\M VI. I.\ KM .SKTS A .\«H KWOHTIIV KXAMIM.K 



IN 1'>18. Hi mnkss S< hkkn first ri-pnrii-ii Cleve- 
liuid I'iliM I'i'slivul av\ar(ls tn factual, infor- 
mational and iiiliiT Useful I6nini motion 
pirlures si'lei ted li\ audience juries of Clcve- 
landers from all walks (d lifi'. The Cleveland 
I'ilrri (!ouneil is alxiut t<> present the fourth cd 
lliese annual civic events in June of this vear. 

19511 Cleveland Festival selections, made in 
various special suhject classificalions such as 
jiuhlir relatiiins films. Irainin;; films, religious 




FiK.sr Aw Mill: Mi.MM. lh(.ih;\K I'li.Ms 

Sponsor: Tlie Nail. Inst, of Menial Health 

I'ruducer: Sun Dial Films. Inc. 




'V 



FiHsr Aw vni>: Thvimnc. Fii.ms 

.^piinsor: Ohio Itell Telephone Conipanv 

I'riiducer: Souiul Masters. Inc. 



SILEN 
^PARTNER 



I'H't I .:. . \ WlNMH 

Sponsor: Flasl Ohio (>as Cnm|>anv 
TriHluerr: Rnlwrl Varnnll lliihie I'rmluclicm* 



films, etc. are shouii in title cuts iin this page. 
(.>thers, not pictured or shov»n in other coni|»«"- 
titions include Makf Mine Freedom and The 
Miijiii- Key I see opposite page I: and Hifihuayi 
lo Haiiaii 1 1 nited .Airlini-s) . Three l')V) win- 
ners are also shown bolow and these continue 
on the follow itig page. (Cleveland's handsome 
■■os<ars" are prized l>y lioth spitnsors and pro- 
ducers who have received this puhlic tribute to 
the ciinleni id their pictures. iOvkhi 




I'IKsl \w M<l>: 
Sponsor: Lundn-rmen 



I'rn.li 



Wil.li 



\M. 1^ I'li.Ms 

Mutual Casuallv Co. 
I'iiture I'fodurlinn-. !m . 




I'U'» "Fills r IN ( J.\ss" \\ INMK 

.'^piiiisor: .Naticinal Lutheran Cnuni il 

Priiducir: (.it.i\>l I dm-. Im 




l'M9 "First in Ci.ws " Winnik 

S|M>niH>r: Hell Telephone Coin|Minv 

I'riHlucrr: Wilding Picture I'riHiuetions. Inc. 



\iv 



ntervlew 



I'H') •FlKST IN ("USS" \X INNKK 

S|Miiis<>r: (ii'iifral Molors CorporatiDM 
Producer: The Jam llaii(l\ Organization. Inc. 



DIAGNOSIS 



1949 "First in Cl.\ss" Winnkh 

Sponsor: St. Paul .Mercury IndtTMiiiU Co. 

Producer: Chicago Film Studios 

CLFAEl.XM) MVNAGEMENT CLINIC 



^^■■'l 



nESEINIIDf 



)um 



FiK.sT .Am \Kii; NUkkktinc F11..MS 

Sponsor: Kraft Foods Conipanv 

Producer: Wilding I'icture Productions. Inc. 




hlK.ST .\\\ \Kll: hl.N,\N(.IAl. KKI'OHT FIL.M.S 

Sponsor: (k-neral Klectric Company 
Producer: Kaphael G. Wolff Studios 



Business Awards 

CLEVELA.ND MA.N.XGKiMKNT CLIMC 

•k The (".levelaiul Chapter of the Society for ihi' 
\d\ancemeiit of Management made screening 
arrangements at the national gathering of its 
mendiers in that city last year. Films were voted 
upon for "firsts" in various classifications such 
as industrial relations I /Vice 0/ Firi'ilam \ . mar- 
keting il^hff.sr Family III111111): plant films ( .-/ 
Fair />(/>".« If iirk. produced li\ Films for liidus- 
lr\ for Procter & (;and)lel: and production 
films [The Human Bridji,e\ produced l)> H. G. 
Wolff for the Ford Motor Company. 

Another film selected hy this business jury 
«as Hell III Make a (iooil Impression. 





F1K.ST Award Medal Winnkr 
Spon.sor: General Electric Company 
Producer: Raphael (;. Wolff Studios 



First \« \ri): Mosto.n IMvkrsitv. \')V<'> 
Mkkit Aw Alto: National Cr)MMiTTKK 

ON Films for Safety. 1949 

"First in Class" Award: Clf.veland 

Film Festival. 194H 

Sponsor: .Sinclair Oil & Refining Company 
Producer: Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

* The critical importance of safety education in 
liie rural field was .s(]uarely met by a motion 
|)iclure that has won universal honors whenever 
factual films are judged. Miracle in I'aradiie 
i alley, sponsored by the Sinclair Oil & Refining 
Company, has earned another tribute — v»ith 
more than a thousand prints now in circulation, 
iiiatu of them purchased by other concerns for 
^iiiiwing throughout rural .\merica. This picture 
exemplifies the public service contribution which 
the creative and technical abilities of the pro- 
ducer can make to the good of all concerned. 



Other Film Festivals Record Audience Totals 



ir Chicago inaugurated the "film festival" idea 
in 1949 when various educational and sponsored 
subjects were screened at the Surf Theatre un- 
der the auspices of the Chicago Film Council. 
Clean If alers. a General Electric picture ( see 
title above I won audience acclaim as did the 
The Slory of Menstruation ( International Cellu- 
cottonl: Lever Age (Shell Oil Co:): Men of 
Gloucester ( Ford I : and Trees and Homes ( We\ - 
crhaeuserl. I'uchio Hoy. another F'ord picture, 
won honorable mention. 

The news that Boston will initiate a similar 
event on Mav 26 when the Boston Film Coun- 
cil holds its first annual festival adds further 
incentive to both producers and sponsors for 
better pictures. 



"k A single current 16min sponsored motion 
picture Unfinished Rainbows, sponsored by the 
Aluminum Comparn of America a good many 
vears ago. illustrates significant differences be- 
tween educational and entertainment films as 
it continues to add to its already tremend- 
ous audience approximating I^O.dOO.tMK) .Ameri- 
cans, voung and old. Kainhous is distributed by 
Modern Talking Picture Service. Inc. and by it- 
sponsor. 

The film library of the I . S. Bureau of Mine- 
has another record breaker in Arizona and //> 
\alural Resources, produced by Atlas (see be- 
low I and sponsored b\ Phelps-Dodge. Arizona 
led all Bureau-distributed films in audiem c 
popularity last >ear. • 




Sl'Kl.lAL ,\U VKD MtDVl. WiNNKR 

Sponsor: Ford Motor Company 
ProduciT: Transfilm. Inc. 



"Ol Tsl \Ml|N(. IN I'Uil.ll \l ( KI'TANCK" 

Sponsor: Phelps-Doilge for I . S. Bur. of Mines 
Producer: .Atlas Film Corporation 



Public lllilily Award 

Ai) m\n\(;kks sklkct films 

it VtiT nian\ M-ars. \\ hciicxcr ■.uital)l«- films in 
ilw ()ul>li<- utililios fit-Id an- ili-fiiird worllu "f 

i^i<lerati<>n, a special comniiltec of the I'uhlii 
I iililii's Advertising Association has included 
|iii Uiri's in its antiiial company advertising 
ivvirds ciimpclitioii. 

/'i/ic «/ I'lftil). piiidiiii'd for the Mirliigan 
( ..Msolirlalcd Gas Company l)> TIk- Jam llandx 
Organization is the latest film to n'cci\c the 
"hfst film" award in the Puhlic Ttilitics pro- 
■jram. Producers and sponsors of films in this 
Im Id arc urged li\ the Association to liring suit- 




Isr \\\ m;ii: I'i Kill I iiiiiii- \i>v. Assn. 
Sponsor Michigan (^onsoiidalid (.as Conipain 
Producer: The Jam Handy Organization, Inc. 

ahle new [iroducl to their attention for consider- 
ation in the < urrent vears sele<tions. 

• • « 

Anu'ricaii Piililic Rchitioiis" "Aiivil.s" 
.Awarded to S|)i)nsorc<l Pi<-tiires 
■*• Anothi-r of the honors accorded l.a.sl Dnir. 
the .National Safety first-prize winner of V)VK 
was the coveted American Puhlic Relations As- 
sociation ■"Anxii" award in 1050. 

To Pathi'scope Productions and llarris-Sey- 
bold (j)mpan\ went another "" Vnvil" award of 
the .\P1{.\ for HoH- lo Make a (,oi)il Impression. 
The Bank of America received an .\ward of 
Merit from the same group for The AVtc Cali- 
fornia, a <locumentarv review of that state pro- 
duced \<\ the Marili of Time. MemU-r inlcre-l 
in films is reflected in the growing altenlicm 
paid this medium at each year's annual conven- 
tion of this puhlic relations group. • 




Si'KciAi. Citation: ,\mkh. Thvok Kxkc. A.ssn. 

.">ponsi>r: Natl. Assn. of Ketail Grocers 

Producer: Dallas Jones Productions 

Trade Associalion Forum 
Preseiils Award of Meril 

it \ handsome ccrlifirale Award of Merit was 
given last \ear lo the National Association of 
IJetail Grocers for the complete audio-visual 
packaged Better Stores Program sponsored by 
ihal national trade group and produced by 
Dallas Jones Productions. Chicago. The Merit 
\ward was nuule l>\ the American Trade A.sso- 
cialion Kxecutives "for having rendered out- 
standing service to the industry which it repre- 
sents as well as to the American Puhlic." 

The N\Ri;rs program consisted of a first series 
of seven color and sound slidefilms. An antici- 
pate<l retailer audience of 2(I.IHM) increased to 
21().(HH) retailers and their staffs. The pa< kaged 
program, deemed readily adaptable in concept 
hv other groups, was selected for national honors 
not onK because of the broad acceptance among 
member groups but be<ausc its usi-rs agreed that 
il had made a <lefinile and important i-ontribu- 
lion to their operational success. 

The ATAF. Awarils are especially created for 
trade as.sociation groups and films of such trade 
bodies are elegible for consideration. 

Rc^ioiKil Piililic Rehiti(iii> Awards 
■k W lu-n the Massat husdts Industries group 
cited The Story of Shell in 1949 as an outstand- 
ing film of its tvpe last year, it echoes similiar 
regional trade group honors to sponsori-il films, 
in Ohio, ihe Ohio Safi-tv (Council gave an in- 
dieation of the national awards made last month, 
when it cited .4 (Hosed Hook as the outstanding 
«afel\ motion picluri- of the year. 







W^^^H 








vM 




■'^ 




i 

mi 


m 


L 


di 



lille; ■■ Assignment (ieneral Mills" 

1st Awako: Financial %'oklo ■Mjscah'* 

Producer: Apex Film Corporation 

Annual llqiorl Films 
Win Financial "Oscars" 

"k Ihe u.-x- 111 nioliwii pii lurc> and Miund slide- 
films as amcdium for annual reports to share- 
holders has been successfully demonslrati-d in 
recent years by General Mills and by such con- 
cerns as I'nited States Steel, the Standard Oil 
Cimipanv of New Jers«'\. Penn Mutual Life In- 
surance Company, and bv the Metropolitan Life 
Insurance (iompany. 

.issifininent General Mills look top honors in 
the annual Financial World magazine competi- 
tion on annual reports in l').SI). winning the 
"Oscar of Industry" for General Mills. A Gen- 
eral Mills picture deneral Mills Totlay was cited 
for similiar honors last year. \\h'\ prmluced 
the latest film: the previous picture wa* an 
RkO-Palhi- production. 

Metropolitan Life Insurance receive*! top 1950 
honors in the same contest for employei- rejM>r1 
films with the pro<luelion \eHsueek Looks At 
l.ijr Insiirante. 

The l'>ii{ award went to General Electric in 
1947 produced for that company by Raphael G. 
Wolff Studios. The impressive ceremonies which 
mark each xear's annual awards event were at- 
tended b\ an average of I..S(IO top leaders in 
busiiu-ss and industry. A distinguished jury of 
educalional and financial authorities assists the 
publication in making these annual srieclions. 

In 1'>17 we n-porleil the Financial World 
award niaile to Penn Mutual Life Insurann* 
Companv for A Century of Security which rr- 
cci\ed till- bron/e "OMar of lndu>lr\." Paul J. 

FfMliell Slmli.iv \% .1., iIh- (irodlli rr • 




1st Avv\Rn: Amk.rkan Pin. Hki_ A.isn. 

Sponsor: Ilarris-Sevbfild Company 

I'roclur-er: The Palhesiii|>e Co. of .Vmerica. Inc. 




Si'lllM \« MIO: \| VNsM Ml s» TTS ImiI sTHirs 

Sponsor: Shell Oil ('ompany 
Producer: Tondin Film Production* 




Isi Vw»Kn: FlN^MMl. UuHlJ» "Os) \k" 

Sponsor: Standard Oil C«>. of New Jersr\ 

Pnidurer: The Pallirsropr Comi»an> of 

America. Inc. 




iJiciv nm 



J 



1st Awaki): Tr-\ffic Smi 11 Class 

Sponsors: General Petroleum and 

Socony-VacuuMi Oil Cos. 

Producer: Roland Reed Productions. Inc. 




1st A« khd: riixn-ic Sakktv (Ilvss 
.SfMinsor: Farm liun-au Insurance Companies 
Produi cr: \\ ililin" l'i( lure I'roiluilions. Inc. 




National Committee Honors Safety Pictures 

TWEM\.r\\0 SI HJKCrs AKL SKLKCIKI) l(»li lv:,(i \\\ \H|)S 



Tin: \\\ \HI)S KVCII VKAK lo out^land• 
iri^ vafelN iiiiitiiin pictures and sound i-lidc- 
lilms |)rc>duc<ii during the previous twelve 
months e\emplif\ a tradition and an iticenli\e 
program uhich has contrihuted much to the 
pulilic recofinition of the value of hims in edu- 
cation ar)d industry. As an incentive the amnial 
awards nuule hy The Connnittee on Films for 
."^afelN have spurred holh producers and sponsors 
to more elTective and original lilms. wortliv of 
these national honors. 

The National Committee is trulv reprcsenta- 
tiM' of a hroad cross-section of those who use 
and those who know these films. Represented 
in tlie present tnendiership are the American 
Assoiialion for Adult Kducation. the American 
Association of Motor Vehicle Atlministrators. 
the American Automoliile Association, the 
American National Red Cross. American l'ui)lic 
lliidth Association. American Society of .Safely 
F.Miiineers. Association of Casualty and Surety 
Companies. Association of Safety Council Ex- 



ecutives, and the \utomoti\e .^afetv Foundation 
Other organi/alions represented on the imn 
mittee are: Internalional Association of Chief> 
of Police. .National Association of .Manufacturers. 
National As.socialion of Mutual Casually Com 
panics. National Commission on .Safety Kduca- < 
lion. National Retail larm Kijuipment Assoc ia- i. 
lion. National .Safety Council. U. S. Junior 
Chandler of (Commerce, l. S. Navy, U. S. Puhlic 
Roads Administration, and I . S. Army. 

John R. Mc(;ullough. director of technical 
.services. Motion Picture Association of America. 
is chairman of the committee. \\ illiam I'.iig- 
lander of the National Safctv Council is its ex- 
ecutive seeretarv . 

Five motion pictures and three sound slide- 
films have been chosen hy the National Com- 
mittee as the outstanding acciclent prevention 
films jiroduccd in l'A5(l. In aildition five other 
films were given honorahle mention and nine 
others were picked for merit awards. The ri.m- 
plete list of 1950 award winners follows: 



The 1930 Motion Picture and Sound Slidefilni .\vvar«l 
Winners of The National Connnittee on Films for Safety 



1>1 ^^1 . < ll ( I |'\ I liiN M >>AFKTV 

Sponsor: Nat. As.sn. Auto. Mull Ins. Cos. 
Producer: Vogue-\^righl Studios Film Div. 



N ()\ -T n K atrk; al Motion Pictikks 

General Class 

Winner: Once Too Often, produced hy U. S. 

Army .Signal Corps for I'. .S. .Armv. 
Honorahle Mention: Shootinp. Safely, produced 

hy Sound Masters. Inc.. for Sporting .Arms 

and Annnunition Manufacturers Institute. 
Award of Merit; The Torch, produced hy Pathe- 

scopc Productions for National Roard of lire 

Underwriters. 

Occupational ("lass 
Wimiir: Malic \o MislaLc. produced in C>ulf 

Coast Films for Geophysical Service. Inc. 
Honorahle Mentions: Before the Blast, produced 

hy Aetna Casualty & ."surety Co. for Aetna 

Life AfTdiated Companies. 
Safely Precautions for Electronics Personnel. 

produced hy Leslie Roush Productions for 

U. S. Navy.' 

Traffic & Transportation Class 

Co-Winners: ./ (.loscil liooL. produced hy Wild- 
ing Piiturc Productions. Inc. for Farm Rurcau 
Insurance Companies. 
Uitl Then There Were Four, produced h\ Ro- 
land Reed Productions for (iencral Petroleum 
Company. 

Honorahle Mention: Your Permit to Drive, pro- 
duced hy General Motors Photographic for 
General Motors Corporation. 

Awards of Merit: LooL- If hat )i>u're Missiiif:. 
produced l)\ Master Vlolion Picture ("o. for 
Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. 

Safe on Tico Wheels, produced hy Aetna for 
Aetna Life Afliliated Companies. 

Serjeant Bruce Kei><irtinfi. produced hv R. R. 
Clard\ for Lundiermens .Mutual Casualty Co. 



We Drivers, produced h\ llie jam Handy Or- 
ganization for (ieiicral Motors Corporation. 

T II K A TRIG A I. M O r I O \ P I C T L R E S 

Winner: It ronii U ay Butch, produced hy Melro- 

GoldwMi Ma\er. 
Honorahle .Mention: Danger Sleuths, produced 

h\ RKO-Pathc. Inc. 

Theatrical Trailers 

Deadly Odds I and others I produced hy Atlas 
Film (iorporation for the National Safet\ 
Council. 

SoiND Slidefilms 

General Class 

VX'irmer: Shocking, Conditions, produced l'\ 
Paragon Pictures for /urich-Ainerican Insur- 
ance (Companies. 

Home Safely Class 

Awards id Merit: Home .S"o/e/y and Health Dc 
parlnienis, produced hv Puhlic Health Serv- 
ice. Federal Security Agency. 

Where's the Fire? — Self-produced h\ Lihertv 
Mutual Fire Insurance (]o. 

Oceiip.il ion.d Class 
Winner: Freinht llandlini:.. pnxluced hy Sarra, 

Inc.. for the National Safetv Council. 
Award of Merit: Sfieakinp of Safety (series of 

six I produced h> Sarra. Inc.. for National 

Safety Council. 

TraflTie anil Transportation 

Winner: Cautiitn al the Crossroads, produced 
hy Vogue-Wright Studios for National As- 
sociation of Aulomotive Mutual Insurance 
Companies. 



Hrize-tt inninii Safety h'ilmn 



<>!•> SAFE'I ^ I MM \\\ \KI)S 



k Last year, the National Committee on Films 
or Safely awartied honors to l.asl Dale, as llii- 
irst 16mrn sound motion picture in the field of 
rallii- and transportation safety and to Safe As 
) 1)11 Think I see iielow I as the hest inotioii |>i(- 
uri- ill thi- field of general safet\. 

Ill addilion to the awards pictured lielou. 
S((/e Clolhinfi. produced by the National Film 
lioard of Canada, was the hest occupational 
■iafel\ iiiotion picture. A sound slidefiliii "firsi" 
Wii> j;i\eii Here's Haw. produced In Paragon 
for the Zurich Insurance Company; honorahlc 
iiieiitioiis went to Yardiiifi Lofis, Fire In Minia- 
ture, and The Ape of Danger. The title frame of 
l.iist Dale appears on another page of this awards 
sc( lion. Three l')W awards are shown helow : 



^< 



M^l 



u Li- 



as WfllNR 



l>r \w\RD: Genkrai. S\kkt\ I m.\i- 

Sponsor: General Motors Corporation 

Producer: The Jam Mand\ Organizalim 



SenJtACUtt 

0% 



PETROLEUM PRODUCTS ON THE FARM 



SpEiiiAi. Citation (SSF): .Sakktv Films 

Sponsor: American I'etroliMim Institute 

Producer: (!ara\cl Films. Inc. 




l<n« SAFK'I "^ I II.M \\\ \K|)- 



'k Safety film award- for subjects produced in 
l'>48 included top honors to The Safest Way 
l|)roduced at Penn State College! for 16inni 
films in the field of Irallie and transportation: 
to 77iM If ay Out. an \mericaii Airlines him: 
and ill the field of sound s|idetiliii>. |o Paragon 
Pictures for Helfiinii flamls. iinuluced for Zurich. 
.\ special citation was giM-n .Sarra. Inc. for the 
series of six sound slidiTilms. Human Factors 
in Safely, produced for the National Safcl\ 
Counc-il. 

Other award winners are pictured on this 
page. Honorable mentions were also given Fall- 
inp Timber, produced by Harig Films of Seattle 
for the Loggers A.ssn.: and to I.el's .'iloj) ami 
Go Safely, produced by Porlafihns. Inc. (Ovkhi 



m^y. 



ASmtUJfUi&uTi^iUltinc 



\<\ \w mid: .{smm Svkf.ty Films 

Sponsor: Ameriian Transit Association 

Producer: Sound Ma-lers. Ini-. 




.M'KCIAL C.CIMML.\D\ril>.\; (.l.M.UVI. .■"lll.n 

Spon.sor: Aetna Life AITiiiated Companies 
Producer: Aetna .Motion Picture |)i-pl. 



SACA OF 

^Awpust $am 



ALMOST CAREFUL HIRED MAN 



•MT i. I C4tl «y ■ 1M« 



M'KllVI. ClT\TI(IN: (;kNKH\L SlKKf^ 

."Sponsor: The J. 1. Cast- Companv 
Producer: .Vilas Film Corporation 




I -I \W \l(|i: (.1 M KM. >\H n 

Sponsor: horeslr\ Service. I . S. DepC. of .\gr. 
I'rodmer: Film- for SafetN. Inc. 




1st \w Mil) iSSFl: Tkxkhc S\fi:t^ 

*>ponsor: Zurich- \mericaii Insurance CoV. 

Producer: Paragon Pictures, Inc. 



l-i \w vHO iSSFi: (>criip*Tio^»i. S*>kt> 

.Sj«>n«or: Zuriih- Xmrricm ln«urnncr C«i'», 

PriMluirr: P.iragon Piitiirrs. Inc. 



Si'KciAL Citation: Genkh^l Saiet\ 
SiMinsor: .Arlna Life \flilinled (lompnnij"* 

Prodiii.-r: Vi-ln.i M..ti..i, PI. tur. I»i ],t 



WHEEL 

SENSE 



<?/TRANSFILMi%JMi^ 

cartMOMT mt IT m stom»au« cwtmutim 

AU unn issntvD 



.>i'K Ml. CiTvTioN: Tm»Kn ^*^^t^ 

Sptinwir: The Sluilrbnkrr Corporation 

Producer: Tiiin«filni Inr. 



Prize-W inning Safely Films 

i«h: SAFKTV I li-M AW A K OS 



1916 SAFETY 1 IL.M \ W \KI)S 



Safettf 

OUR NUMBER ONE 
CROP 



V?i-i'?fa»^ 



lll!>l A«Alil): liKMlKAL S.\Ki:i1 

Sponsor: General Motors Corporation 
Producer: Snuiul Masters. Inc. 



■*■ Pictured in the adjoining eolutnn are award- 
\N inning safety films produced in I'/17, to wliicli 
-ImiiM l)c iid<lcd Didiinosis Dinififr. produced \t\ 
(!liiciini) I' iliii .'^Uiiiiiis and pictured on a prc-\i- 
iius page: alsci l.iir and l.rl l.iiv. pnidiiii-d li\ 
\ctna. 

I'Md productions were headed l»v I'riceless 
(^(11 fill and //',v W anion Murder, both Ifinnn films 
pictured below: Mary Jones Goes Id (.inirt was 
\olcd the liest IrairK- safet\ sound slidelilni. A 
special i'i>Mnn<-ndalii>n was made to (icn<'rai Mo- 
Iciis fcpi Diiiliir In hidiislry. produced \>\ Jam 
Hand). Honorable mentions went to The Gianl 
Story, Time to Stop, Voice of Safely, There's 
No Place Like Home, and to two Sarra sound 
slidefilms. Prevention Is Belter and It's ) Our 
Home — I'hn ll Safely. 






Isr Aw \Ki) iS."^Ki : Gk.neral Safety 

Sponsor: Zurich-American Insurance Go's. 

Producer: Atlas Film Gorporation 



1st Awakd: Trafkk: Safety 

Sponsor: Superior Coach Gorporation 

I'roducpt : The Jam HaiulN Organization, Inc. 



Special Citatio.n kok F.xcellence 

Sponsor: General Motors (Corporation 
I'roduier: The Jam lland\ Organization 



Other Safely Film Awards 

"k Safety film awards date back to 1942 in our 
files when Steps to .Safety produced for the New 
Jersey Dept. of Motor Vehicles was given a fir-t 
jilace plaque. Sculptured trophies of the Amen 
can Automobile Association went in that vear 
to Drive Defensively and Are Your Feet Kill- 
ing You? 

1944 awards were outstanding in terms of im- 
portant films. A' Marks the Spot won the traflic 
safety honors of that year and To Live In Darl.- 
ness, a Navy film, was the best occupational 
safety motion picture. Hoth titles are pictured 
below. • 




HuNdKMii.i Mention: I'hodlction Safei'i 
Sponsor: American Red Cross 
Producer: Ted Nenieth Studios 



1st Award (SSFI: Traffic Safety 

Sponsor: National Safety Council. Inc. 

Producer: Sarra. Inc. 



1st Aw \m>: Traffic Safety 

Sponsor: .New Jersey Dept. of .Motor Vehicles 

Producer: The Jam Handy Organization 




Ho.NORAHI.E MiMIon: ( )i I M'M ion \1. SAtKI\ 

Sponsor: Denver \ Hio (>rande Western Railroad 
Producer: Sonochrome Pictures 



ll<'N(iiiu;i I \liMiiiN: Traffic Safety 

Sponsor: American Transit Association 

Producer: William J. Ganz 



Isi \w vKi): 0( (ii'ATioNti. Safety 

Spcmsor: I . S. Navv ( Bu. Aer.) 

Producer: 2()th Century-Fox Film Corp. 



A GEOGRAPHICAL IM)i:X 
TO PRODUCER LISTINGS 

New England Region 
Connecticut. Massachusetts Page 38 

Metrupulilan .New \ ork. Area 
Listings on Pages 38, 39, 40, 41. 42. 4.1 

Middle Atlantic Re-iion 

New Jersey. New York Slate Page 4^i 

Pennsylvania. Washington. I). C Page A-V 

Southeastern Region 
Georgia Page 44 

Kentucky. Louisiana, North Carolina 

and Tennessee Page 45 

East Central. Region 

Indiana, Ohio Page 45 

Detroit, Michigan Page 46 

Metropolitan Chicago Area 
Listings on Pages 47, 48. 49 

West Central Regi))n 

Illinois, Iowa Page 49 

Minnesota, Missouri, Wisconsin Page 50 

Southwestern Region 
Texas Page 50 

Mountain States Region 
Colorado _ Page 51 

West Coast Region 
Northern California Page 51 

Metropolilan \a» Angeles .Area 
Listings on - Pages 52, 53. SI. 55 

Pacific Northwest Region 
Oregon. Washington Page 55 

Canadian Film Producers Page .'i.'i 




The 1951 

Business 

Screen 

National 

Survey 

of Film 

Production 

Resources 

in the U. S. 

and Canada 



NUMBER 2 • \«ll. IME 12 • 14SI 



NEW EIVULAND 



John A. Haksei.kr 

Ainily Hoiiii 
W uo<ll>riil"c, Connorliinit 



Hoi. Alt Si I DIOS 

aiui Koi.Aii PiioTo-SciKNci: Laboratories 

Suiidy Hook. (A)iiniTti<-iit 

I'lionf: .Npwtowii 581 

Date of Or-iiiiiization: 1928 

Henry Roger. Owner-Director 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefilnis: indus- 
trial, fduialiiinal. ii\ic relations, animated. I'. .S. 
Armed Services. Government agencies. 

Facilities: 1 6mm and .S.inun cameras, zoom and 
follow track, camera truck, portable generator: 
sound sla-ies: M-K Solar spots. Hroads: lOmni 
recorder, disi' recording system, mapnelic tape 
retorder; microscopic laboratory and close-up 
studio: Shadowgraph, lnspectosco|x;: Interlock 
film phonograph: color |>ri[iting: library. 

RECKNT I'RODHTIONS AND SPONSORS 
From the Customer' s I'oiiit of I iew (Connecticut 
Light \ Power Company ) ; Appeal to the Public 
(The Lnitcd Hospital Campaign of Waterbury. 
Conn. I: I'arlial Denture Construction (J. M. 
Ney Companv I : From the Customer's Point 
of lieu- I Hartford Electric Light Company I : 
Telephone Pioneers { Southern New England 
Tele|)hone- Com|)an\ I : Powerhouse (lnitcd Il- 
luminating ('<>mpan\ > . 



Dekko Film Productions, Inc. 

12() Dartnioiitli Street 
|{o-loM. Ma~>acliiisptts 



Depiioire Stidios 

782 (^onirnonwealtb Avenue 

Boston 1.1. ^^a^^aclulsetts 

I'lionc: BKacon 2-.t722 

Date of Organization: 193.1 

OFFICER.S AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Jo.scpli Dephourc. Owner 

Henry J. Hmnnc). Sales Representative 

Edward (jilman Hichard Lewis 

Estelle I). Davis 

Services: Industrial and public relations motion 
pictures and slidefilms; television program films, 
and commercials. 

Facilities: Drive-in sound stage and produc- 
tion c(|uiptnent: autimiatic film |)roressing; syn- 
chronous magnetic recording and sound film 
recording: projection and editing rooms: Koda- 
ehrome printing: art work, atiimalion. script 
writing. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Skilleit Hanils jitr Aviation (Allen .School of 
Aeronautics I ; Mitl Century Fashion Review 
I I. J. F"ox Fur Compan) I : More Power to You 
( Wesliiighou.*e & Edison Light Company): 
Finast Drivinii Traininfi (First National Stores. 
Inc. I : /low to i se a I otinp Machine (('onnnon- 
wi-allh of Mas.'*a(husett» I : A Fella IVeeds a 
Frienil (lnitcd Communitv .Services). 



Master Motion Picti he ('.ompwv 

.">() Piedmont Slrc<l 

Boston l<). Massachusetts 

Phone: HAncock 6-3.W2 

Dale of Organization: 1925 

OKEICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

.Maurice Masler. President and Treasurer 

S. Grace Master. Secretary 

Irving Koss. in Charpe of Production 

Wilbert Hansen. Studio Manager 

Services: Industrial and civic relations motion 
pictures and slidefilms: theatre trailers: tele- 
vision commercials. 

FAf:iLITlES: 16nim and .'JSmm sound recording 
studio: 16mrn and .iSmni processing laboratory: 
Ivpeselters and artists for title-making: anima- 
tion stands, editing and projcctiun rooms. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Fire in Miniature (Lnitcd Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company): Boston, the Shipper's Port (Port of 
Boston Authority): Look What You're Missing 
(Liberty Mutual Insurance Company): Modern- 
ization oj Sewniic Trealmenl Plant I ITavdcn. 
Harding i> liucliaiicii. Kngiiiccrs ) : Amputee Re- 
lutliilitalion (Liberty Mutual Rehabilitation 
Centre). 



Hw State I'iim Piictnt ctions. In( . 

I.')K Bri.lge Street 

Springfield. ^Ia--acllll^ett^ 

Plion<-: l-:il()l 

Date of Organization: 19 It 

Branch: 8(1 BovNton Street. Bo^■lon. M;i 

Phone': llan<'ock ()-89IU. 

oniCKKS AM) DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Morion 11. Ki-ad. President 

Eugene N. Hunting. V.P. (Prod.) 

David Dovlc. y.P. {Sales) 

Milton L. i,evy. y.P. (TV) 

Harold O. Stanton. V.P. {Dist.) 

Services: Documentary, sales training, public 
relations and television motion pictures anc 
slidefilms: tlramatic dialogue presentations. 

Facilities: Camera and lighting; sound stage; 
portabli' generator: .Maurer 16mm recording; 
synchronous magnetic recording: Depue print 
ing e(|uipnient: 16miii black and white develop- 
ing: 15 technicians: art and creative staffs. 



Worcester Film Corporation 

131 (Central Street 

W orcester 8, .Massacliu.setts 

Weld Morgan. President 



METIIOIMILITAX >EW V4MIK 



Affiliated Film Prodccers 

164 East 38tli Street 
New York 16. N. Y. 
Phone: Ml rray Hill 6-9279 
Date of Organization: 1946 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Willard Van Dyke. Secretary 
Irving Jacoby. Treasurer 
Rishard Leacock. Camera Department Head 
Thomas Boyajian. Edilinji Department Chief 
Services: Script to finished film. Specialties: 
documentary and educational films. 
Facilities: Production equipment; editing de- 
partment: directors and script writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
The Photographer (U.S. Department of State) ; 
Mount Vernon in Virginia ( Mount Vernon 
Ladies' Association): Marriage Today (Mc- 
Graw-Hill Text Films): This Charming Couple 
( MiGraH-llil!) : // Takes All Kinds (McGraw- 
Hill): Choosing for Happiness (McGraw-Hill): 
fVho's Boss'::' (McGraw-Hill) ; Angry Boy (Men- 
tal Health Film Board): .Secure the Blessings 
I Natiniuil Kdmaliciii \>sn(iaticiri i . 

American Film Producers 

160(1 Broadway 

New ^ork 19. N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-.59I5 

Dale of Organization: 1916 

OFFICERS AND DEPAUTMENT HEADS 

Robert Gross. Executive Producer 

Lawrence A. Glesnes, Executive Producer 

Lester J. Orlebeck. Editorial Chief 

Julian C. Townsenil. Head Cameriunan 

David Mathews. Script and Creative Chief 

Al Stahl. in Charge of Animation 

Services: Sponsored motion iiicturcs and slide- 



films for theatres, television, education, training, 

sales. 

Facilities: Portable production equipment, 
16mm and 35mm with sound, stage for shooting 
small sets; special effects: animation; storyboard 
persomiel. scri|)t writers. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
International House (U. S. Army Civil Affairs 
Division ) : Ready for Flight ( Department of De- 
fense) ; Civil Air Patrol ( Hcad(|uarters, Civil Air 
Patrol): Look to the Skies (I. S. Air Force): 
doing Places (Air Force Recruiting) ; Yours for 
the Asking ( Armv Recruiting); Mark 63 Gun- 
sight, Theory and Operation ( U. S. Navy) ; Air- 
men in Training ( U. S. Air Force) ; TV Com- 
mercials for Dodge. Rinso. American Safety 
Razor, others. 

\)'E\ Film Coisi'ipk vikin. .!;; K. 57th Street. 
New ^i>rk (jt\. I lull listing on page .52.1 

* * ♦ 

Audio Prodictions. Inc. 

Film Center Ltuilding 

630 Ninth Avenue 

New '^ ork 19. N. Y. 

Phone: COIumbns .5-6771 

Date of Organization: 1933 

Ol !!< ERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Frank K. Spcidell, President 

Herman Roe.ssle. Vice President 

Lawrence W. Fox. Jr.. Treasurer 

P. J. Mooney. Secretary 

Phillips B. Nichols. Sales Manager 

Services: Motion pictures only, all commercial 
categories. S|)ecialties: public relations, sales 
promotion, merchandising, training, medical, 
other technical and educational. 

Facilities: Camera and lighting equipment, 
four K)mm and 35mm cutting rooms; six film 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Audio l'ri>iliiiliims: dnilitiurd 

vaults; two optical printers; 16mm and .HSmm 
Iprojectioii rixitii: iiiacliitif shop: music director 
land several hundred thousand feet of original 
music on film; seven staff writers and seven staff 
ilirectors. 

RKCENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
An Introduction to Meadiille (The Texas (!oni- 
i.iriyl; Clear Track Ahead (Pennsylvania Rail- 
id); Steam for Power ( Babcock & Wilcox 
i..riipanyl: Crimes of Carelessness (The Na- 
Imnal Hoard of Fire I nderw riters ( ; Telephone 
Hilays (American Telephoni- \ Telegraph Coin- 
I'UMV I ; U hat Do ) ou Knon ahoiil .\eif Jersey 
(The Associated Kailroads of New Jersey) ; 
You're the Doctor (Kthyl Corporation); I'sy- 
ilopy in Education Series (McGraw-Hill Hook 
I ■■Mipanv): Breast Cancer: The I'rohlem of 
liirly Diagnosis (National Cancer Institute \ 
V'lierican Cancer): Films for I. S. Navy, Air 
I ..ice. Department of State and others. 

(See mention in film awards section) 



bl{A.N.SB\ I'KOUKTIO.NS 

122 ^ . 55tli Street 

New York 19. .\. Y. 

Phone: Jl.l-on 6.2WM) 



The Bray Srinios. Inc. 

72') Seventh Avenue 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Phone: Circle 5-4582 

Date of Organization: 1914 

OKKICKRS AM) DKPARTMENT HF.ADS 

J. H. Hray. President 

M. Brav. Treasurer 

V. A. Hray. Secly., Asst. Treas., Prod. .l/gr. 

Stewart Otto. Sales Manager 

H. Kline. Distribution Manaper 

Skrnuxs: Industrial sales and jidi training mo- 
tiim pictures and slidefilms; training films for 
I. S. Armed Forces; theatrical: educational: 
animated cartoons and technical suhjccts: tele- 
vision films. Distributor to schools. 

FaciLITIKS: Studio equipment for all kinds of 
motion pictures and slidefilms, sound and color: 
animation department: production crews, artists, 
script writers: film lihrarv. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Principles of Penicillin Therapy ( E. R. .S<|uil>l> 
& Sons Company ) ; Sales Promotion in Action 
(Schenley Industries! ; Parachutes for Safely 
tSwitlik I'araihute Cotnpany I ; Champion of 
('.hnmi>ions ( Scheide\ Industries); Guard ) our 
Heart (American llc.irl \>~iicijili"ii i . 



CaMPI'S FllM I'lKlDl TTIONS 

U)l Hem-en Sireel 

Brooklyn 2, N. '^ . 

Phone: TKianglr 5-6296 

Date of Or^ani/iilion : 19,')l 

OKKKKIO \M) ItH'MOMI-NT IIKVDS 

Nat Campus, Executive Protlucrr 
Leo R. Rohker, Production Manaper 



i.iinipiis I ilni Proiluctioiis: Continiird 

Servicks: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
business, government and wclfan- agencies: also 
various film services separately, including trans- 
lations, sound tracks; finishing service for com- 
pany photographed films. 

F'acii.itie:^: Camera and on-locution lighting 
equipment; editing: sound recording equipment, 
including magnetic and optical recorders, film 
phonographs, sync projectors, playbacks: crea- 
tive staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
There Is A Difference (Amelia Farhart Lug- 
gage): Endurinp Modern (Valley Furniture 
Company I ; Rail Steel in the World of Today 
(Rail Steel Bar Association); Leadership 
Throuph Research (Spanish Standard Oil Com- 
panv of New Jers«-\ I ; Acres of Happiness ( In- 
dustrial Home for the Blind I : A Job Worth 
Doinp (Southern Railway System): Career for 
Tomorrou- d'. S. Coast Guard I : The Deaf Post 
Rubella School Child ( Lexington School for the 
Deaf) ; Beautiful I' pan a Hill (Wagner College! ; 
Paint Is Our Business ( Benjamin Moore and 
Company); Activity Croup Therapy (Child 
Guidance Institute). 



Caravel P^ilms. Inc. 

730 Fifth Avenue 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Phone: Circle 7-6110 

Date of Organization: 1921 

Studio: l.-i2 Prospect Street. Hempsteail. I.. 1. 

Akron Representative: Visual Methods. Inc.. 

.'?;?6 Second National Building. Akron. Ohio. 

David I. Pincus. President 

F. Burnham MacLeary. P'.P. 

Harold M. Manser. /'./'. 

\rtliiir Kreeger. Treas. (Claire V. Barton. Secty. 

Mauri Goldberg. Mpr. Prod. 

David Kreeger. .">/(/</((> Mpr. 

Jack Semple. .Animation .Mpr. 

Arnold Vogelsang, Slidefilm .Upr. 

Charles Moore. Manaper, SliU Photopraphy 

SKHVlf;ES: Sales, dealer and v<Mational training 
motion pictures: public and personnel relations, 
educational. religi<ius films: television commer- 
cials: slidefilms. transparencies, stage presenta- 
tions, field surveys. 

F\< II.ITIKS: Own motion picture studio at Hemp- 
stead. New York ('it\ headi|uarters have sliilc- 
film stu<lio. cutting and screening rooms, art 
and animation departments. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SIHINSORS 
I'ilamin Rivers (American Can ('ompany I : A 
Study in Black (Godfrey L. Cabot, Inc.); too*/ 
(Company (Cabot); Grouth Industry (Clinton 
Foods. Inc. I; Tomorrou Bepins Tmlay (Purr 
Oil Company ) : Proof of Performance i S<«ony- 
Vacuuni Oil Company I . 

(Sec mention in Sim awards iiection; 



Stars over pnxlucer lifting denote 
advertising copy in thi* issue. 



Cornell Film (!omi'\ny 

1501 Broadua\ 

New ^ork 1». N. Y. 

Phone: Wisconsin 7-6651 

Date of Organization: 19.50 

OKH( ERS AM) DEPARTMENT HE\ll-» 

Milton J. Salzburg. President 
Herman Boxer. I ice Pres. in Charpe of 
Production 
Skrvices: Motion pictures from script to fin- 
ished product: public service and s<H'ial s<iencc 
films. 

F *(:il.lTlK,s: .Studios, cameras, sound equipment: 
full-time production crew. 

RECENT PRODI (TIONS AND SPONStiRS 
Pattern for Survival (a documentar\ i ; Tnrpel 
l'.S..4. (documentary in production • . 
(New company, organized late in I9.50! 

Cavauadk PicllKKs. !>(.. o75 We>t KniJ \ve- 
nue. New York 25. N.Y. Phone: ACademv 
2 l.7!'.l. (Full listing on page .52.! 

I)l I'H III I llMs. Im . 

254 Vlest 54th Street 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Phone: CObiuibus 5-7621 

Date of Organization: 1942 

OFFICERS AM) DEPARTMENT HEAI)> 

John Hans. President 

Services: Sales training film.«. television com- 
mercials. 

Facilities: Studios, art department, animation, 
editorial rooms. 

RECENT PRODI « TIONS AND SIHJNSORS 
Sales training films for Johns-Manville. Singer 
Sewing Machine (jimpany. Lily -Tulip ("up Cor- 
poration. F. R. S(|uibb i> Sons. Bigelow-Sanford 
Carpet Company; tele\ ision commercials for 
Balantine IWr. Remington Rand. Durkee'<. Mns- 
onnaise. Faslman Kodak and others. 



DlDLE^ Pu.mu.s (.iiiUfiiuviiiiN. .)ill Mailison 
Avenue. New ^ ork Cit\. Phone: FLIorado 
5-1076. (Full li.sting on page 52.) 

I)^ NAMK III Ms. I N( . 

112 W. K<»ih St reel 

New ^ork 21. N. Y. 

Phone: IH.if.ik.ir ^■l,22\ 

Jkrh^ I- mriiwks Proki I tions. 157 K. (i')th 
Street. New \ ork 21. N.Y. TRafalgar 95352. 
Rolirrl IjHren<-r. (Full listing on page 53.1 



P»i'L J. Fenneix Company. 405 K. -lOlh Strert. 
New York 16. N.Y. Mlrrav Hill 9.1268. 

Mirk<-\ DiiI'M- 1 Full li-liii!> 5.1.1 



Films kor Indi strv. Inc. 

135 W . 52n.l Strerl 

New ^ork P). N. Y. 

Phone: PI.,i/a .1-2KIM1 

Dale of Organization: I94<l 



N I M B E R 2 • \ O L I .M E 12 • 1 <» i I 



S9 



XE%v voKK nrv 

Films for Industry: ('.onliniied 
OFFICERS AM) DKP ARTMKNT HKAI)S 
Josf|>h M. M.Call.T), I'resiilrnt 
llyliiii Clii-slrr. > ire president 
David Qiiaid, Olli> Coiiislcdt. Directors- 
Cameramen 

Skrvu:ks: Moliun piiiurcs for business; color: 
iiiarionetle (Irpartinciit. 

F\i;lLITIES: lOmm and .S5miii production: lorn- 
lion trut'iv: rcM-anli and wriliiif; slalT. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 

AAA Road Test iSun Oil Conipain I : Holiday 
Harvest (Frankfort Distilk-rs ('orporation I : Kib- 
itzinsL Canned lieer Sales ( Arnt-riran Can Com- 
pany I : I'arlnership in I'lirehasing (Socony- 
\ aiuuin Oil Conipaiiy) ; 4 Fair Day's Pay 
(Procter & Gamble I : Green Gold (I'nion Bag & 
PajH-r Company I ; Miracle of Time (Gruen 
Vi atch Company t : Doin:: liiisiness on lite Tuo 
Label I'lan (National Distillers Corporation). 

(See mention in film awards section) 



FoRDEL Films Division 

of Fordel Film Laboratories 

1187 Uiiiversitv Avenue 

New York 52. N. Y. 

Phone: LI d low 8-510(1 

Date of Organization: 1941 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

C. F. Potts, Executive Producer 

W. G. Snowden. Assistant to Exec. Prod. 

Henry Traiman. General Manager 

\\ . 1'. liornberger. Production Manager 

U. C. Grant. Office Manager 

Medical and -Surgical Advisers: C. Douglas 
Sawyer. M.D.. F.A.C.A.. and Emil A. Naclerio, 
M.D.. F.C.C.P. 

Services: Medical and surgical, educational, in- 
dustrial, promotional motion pictures and slide- 
films, cidor. sound. 16nmi and 35nim: television 
films. 

Facilities: Sound and color camera and record- 
ing equipment: animation, editing and effects; 
relea.^e printing: projector inspection and ship- 
ping: still photography and enlargements: crea- 
tive stall for scripts and translations. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Mediial Films for E. H. Squibb & Sons: Clinical 
Applications of Muscle Relaxants, Curare in Bar- 
biturate Mitrous Oxide Anesthesia, Endotracheal 
Anesthesia. Proneslyl Hyilrochloride — A .Veic 
Drug for \ entricular Arrhythmias, Malnutrition 
in the Hospital Patient, Nutritional Aspects of 
Tropical Diseases, Principles of Penicillin Ther- 
apy, .Streptomycin Drugs in the Treatment of 
Tuberculosis. For I.«"<lerle Laboratories Division 
of American Cyanainiil (-ompany: Aureomycin, 
the Versatile Antibiotic. 



William J. Ga.nz (Iompany 

40 East 49th Street 

New York 17, .\. Y. 

Phone: Kl.dorailo .5-1H.3 

Date of Or<:ani7.ation: 1919 



/) illiani J. tiiinz: ionliiiitnl 

OFFICERS AN!) DEPARTMENT HEADS 

\^ illiatn J. Ganz. President 

E. J. Spiro. Production Manager 

Ilerbrrl U. Dietz. General Manager 

Jane Page, Comptridler 

Services: Producer and distributor of Kunni 
and .H.Smm motion pictures, filinslrips. sound 
slidefihns. >isual presentations for education, 
advertising and television. 

Facilitiks: Studio e(pii[>(nenl : cameras: creative 
stall. ilcveloptncMl of story ideas and merchandis- 
ing campaigns. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Red Cross Report (American Red Cross) ; jour- 
ney to Banana Land ( I nited Fruit Company); 
From Pictures to Profits ( Dixie Cup Company) : 
Your Surest Selling Job (Radio Corporation of 
America); Screen .Magazines (United States 
State Department). 

(See mention in fdm awards section) 

♦ * * 

Gulf Coast Fil.ms. Inc., ') W. 61st Street, .New 
York 23, N. Y. Phone: Circle 6-0191. 

(See coiniilete lisliim in Texas section I 

Paul Hance Productions, Inc. 

1776 Broadway 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Phone: Circle 5-9140 



The Ja.m Handy Orgamzation. Lnc, 1775 
Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. Phone: JUdson 
2-4060. Herman Goelz, in charge. 
(Complete office facilities and projection room 
with service staff maintained in N. \. For com- 
plete data see Detroit. jMichigan listing) 

Hartley Productions 

20 ^ . 47th Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: JUdson 2-3960 

Herbert Keukow. Lnc. 

480 Lexington Avenue 

New York 17, N. Y. 

Phone: ELdorado 5-0683 

Date of Organization: 1937 

OrnCERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Herbert Kerkow. President. Treasurer 

Rosemond Kerkow, Secretary 

Services: Production from original research to 
finished film. Specialties: Public relations films 
for general audiences, educational films for 
schools. 

Facilities: Sound stage, set building depart- 
ment, jirojection. sound recording and re-record- 
ing: editing. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Supply Department .t float ( I'. S. Navy); Crea- 
lire Incisure ( U. S. Army Orientation Branch); 
Art in Hawaii (U. S. Department of State) : 
Adult Education (U. S. Army Orientation 
Branch): Slay in School (U. S. Navy); Pat- 
terns for Parties ( Towle Silversmiths) ; TV com- 
mercials for Camel Cigarettes. Eastman Kodak, 
Cannon Mills, Inc. 



L UK 1{ (loHI'UltATION 

(Louis de Roi'lieinont I 

35 West I5lli Street 

New ^ork 19, N. V. 

Phone: F,L 2-1110 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Louis de Rocbemont. Executive Producer 

Tliornas (tnliard. .Associate Producer 

Lotliar W ojlT. Associate Producer 
V. Hordi-n Mace. Executive Assistant 
.Martin J. Maloney, General Manager 

Services: Industrial, educational and civic rela- 
tions motion pictures: films for L'. S. Armed 
Forces and (ioM-rnmental agencies; short sub- 
jects in color for theatres; television films. 

Facilities: Sound and color e(|uipment for 
camera work on location; portable generator, 
R.C.A. sound channel on 'chassis and electric 
truck. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Here's Health — The American Way (American 
Medical Association): Tiventy-Four Hours of 
Progress (American Petroleum Institute); The 
Whistle at Eaton Falls: Lost Boundaries. 



LOUCKS AND INORLING StUDIOS. InC. 

245 W. 55th Street 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Phone: COIiindiiis 5-6974 

Date of Organization: 1923 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

J. A. Norling. President 

Wil Marcus. I ice President 

Services: Industrial, job and sales training, 
public relations, educational. Government mo- 
tion pictures and slidefilms. 

Facilities: Studio equipment for 16mm and 
35mm productions: animation camera and art 
departments: three-dimensional still and motion 
pictures; creative staff including artist, photog- 
raphers, writers, film editors, directors. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

New Pouer for America (Combustion Engineer- 
ing-Superheater Company) : Building for the 
Nations (United States .Steel Corporation): Re- 
vere System of Water Piping (Revere Copper 
and Brass, Inc.) ; Educational subjects for En- 
cyclopaedia Britannica Films, Inc.; Training 
films for U. S. Navy. 



The March of Time 
369 Lexington Avenue 

New York 19, N.Y. 

Phone: JUdson 6-1212 

Date of Organization: 1935 

OFFICERS AND DEPXRTMENT HEADS 

Richard de Rocbemont. Producer 

Arthur Tourtellot, D. Y. Bradshaw, Asso. Prods. 

Sam Bryant. Gilbert Comte. .-tsst. Prods. 

Frank Shea. T\ and Commercinl Sales Director 

P. A. Williams, Public Relations Director 

Services: Producer of theatrical and non-the- 
atrical documentary films. 

F^ACiLITIES: Equipment for 16nm) and 35mm 
production, studio and location. 



4U 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



77i<' Miirrli (»/ Tinir: Continued 



I'roniiitiuniil Films: l.ontinufd 



KKCENT PRODUCTIONS AM) SPONSORS 
Miracle of Rubber fF'irestone Tire & Rubber 
Company) ; Special Presentation (Burlington 
Mills); Opportunity (Cleveland Klectric liluni- 
inating Company I : The Sew Calijornia I Hank 
of America I ; OH & Men i Stanilard Oil Com- 
pany of Indiana I: Muney at Work (New \ ork 
Stock Exchange I: /7/>/i/ I'lan ( L nited Stales 
Air Force); Call to Action (American Red 
Cross). 

(See mention in film awards section) 



« ♦ •» 

Ml'O Pkodictions. Inc. 

15 E. 53rd Street 

New York 22, N. Y. 

IMione: Mlrray Hill 8-7830 

Date of Organization: 1916 

OKKICKRS AM) DKPARTMKNT HKADS 

Juild L. Pollock, I'resiitent ami Treasurer 

Lawrence K. .Vladii-on. / ./'. Slaidey Resor. Secty. 

Irene Vi ilson, I'roil. Eil. Krwin Scharf, I'rod. Dir. 

Jean Oser, Associate Producer 

Skrvicks: Sales promolion. training, public re- 
lations, informational motion pictures: color 
films and location work. 

F'acII.itiES: 16mm and .')5nnn cameras, lighting, 
sound truck: 16mm and .iSnnn projection room. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Steering with Standards ( Ford Motor Com- 
pany); American Cowboy (Ford I; Yellowstone 
Park (Ford); Pride of Workmanship (Ford); 
Operation '51 ( Ford I : Taniileuood (Lniled 
States Information .Service I; The Rural Hiph 
School (lniled States Information Service); 
Tar Heel Wild Lije (North Carolina Wildlife Re- 
sources Commission) ; The Double Decked Clip- 
per (Pan American Airways): Fishinp in Alas- 
ka. Ilunlini: lliii Came in Alaska ( both for Nash 
Division, Nasli-Kelvinalor Corjioration I . 

I See mention in film awanl- section) 



Ml KiMn-l.iLLis. Inc. 

59 Park Avenue 
New York 16, N. Y. 

Pholir: Ml rr.ix liill ()-!' I 12 



Tki) Nkmktm Sti dios 

729 Si-ventli Avenue 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Phone: Circle 5-5147 

Dale of Organization: 1935 

OFFICERS AM) DEI'AHTMKNT HEADS 

Ted Nemelli, Producer-Director 

M, E. Bute. Associate Producer-Director 

Skrvices: Motion pi<tures and slidcfdms for 
business, TV and theaters. 

Facilities: l()m and .t5min production ei|uip- 
meni, optical prinler, >tages, sounil truck, 

RECENT I'HODltiTIONS AND .SPONSORS 
Danfier Is Your Companion (American Red 
Cross) ; Atlantic Album (Atlantic Refining Com- 
pany) ; The Aldrirh Family l(>enernl Foods 
(^>rp. I ; TV connnercials for lO clients. 

(Sec mention in fdm award- oci lion) 



TlIK I'aI IIKM.OI'K l,OMI'AN\ 

OK .America. Inc. 

( Pathesfoiie ProdiictiitiiM ) 
58(1 Fiflli \veniie 
New York, N. Y. 

Piionc: PLaza 7..52(M) 

Studio: 121 West 54tll Street. New ^ ork, N. Y. 

Date of Organization: 1914 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HF:ADS 

Kdward J. I^mm, President, Exec. I'rod. 

Henry Strauss, Exec. I'.P. and Exec. Prod. 

Walter Raft, Production Manager 

Rogers Keene, Chief Film Editor 

Krwin M. Solms. Robert W ilmol. Boris Kaplan. 

Thomas V. Hale, Run Roman, Ralph Schoolman. 

Creative Staff Members 

Servicks: Research, produclion. audience. test- 
ing and distribution of industrial altitude moti- 
vation, sales and job training, public and civic 
relations motion pictures and slidefdms; train- 
ing films for V. S. Armed Forces; television. 

Fa<:ilitie.s: Color, camera and lighting r(|uip- 
ment; sound systems including Reeves magnetic 
tape recording: background projection unit and 
process screen; editing and projection rooms for 
16mm and 35nnn animation. Permanent cre- 
ative staff: writers, directors, art directors, film 
editors, producers, scenic artists; sound engi- 
neer and other technical personnel. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 

The Inner Man Steps Out (General Klectric Com- 
pany I : Story without End (American Telephone 
& Telegraph Company ) : This Is My Friend 
(The Coca-Cola Company I ; There Is a Differ- 
ence ( Kthyl Corporation ) ; Remote Control Tur- 
ret System (V. S. Army I : The Plymouth Story 
( Plymouth Cordage Company I : Etiquette (edu- 
cational scries for Mcliraw-llill Book (aim. 
pany I : The Torch (National Board of Fire In- 
derwrilersl : Frank Martin. Dairyman (WCsting- 
house Klectric Corporation I ; Partnership for 
the Future (General Foods Corporation). 
(See mention in film awards section) 



PiiiiMiiiioNAi. liiMs (.(»Ml•\^^, Im;. 

119 W. .-.Ul Street 

New York I"». N.Y. 

I'lione; Pl.a/a 7-3351 

Dale of Organi/ulion: 1917 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Jack .Vrnold, Producer 
Lee CotHlman. Prinlucer 

.Services: Motion pictures for businr^s educa- 
tion, civic relalionv (iovernnietil agencies; s|ie. 
cially: human relations film'>. 

Facilitk^: K(|uipment for motion picture and 
lelev ision priKJuclions. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS \M) Slt)N"M»RS 

Ill/A Thr\r lliintif i I iili-rn.il ional I-i4lii-« liar- 



ment Workers' Union) ; At Our House (State of 
Vermont. Department of Health; ; Chicken of 
Tomorrow (Atlantic & Pacific Tea Cijmpany) ; 
Our Union (Local 91, I. L. C. W. L.); I alley 
of the Shadow (Jewish ('onsuinplives Relief .So- 
ciety) ; TV Series, llandmacher.Vogel, Inc; T\ 
Series, I^mpl, Inc.; and others. 

(Sri- riii-ntion in fibii awards m-i tion^ 



K.K.O. Patiie. Inc. 

(»25 Madison Avenue 
New York 22, N. \. 

Phone: S \crainenlo 2-26(H) 

Studio: 1(15 Ka.l KMnli St.. New York. N. Y. 

Date of Organization: 1931 

OFFICERS AND DEPART.MENT HEADS 

llarrv J. Michalson, President 
Jay Bonaheld, / ice President, Gen. Mf^r. 
Douglas Travers, Studio and Prod. Mgr. 

.Services: Industrial and civic relations motion 
pictures; training fdms for l',S. Armed Forces 
and Governmental agencies; televisiim iilui 
shows and commercials. 

Facilities: ."studio equipment for all produc- 
tion nj-eds, including sound, creative staff. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Mister Bell ( American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company); It's .\ews Because It's .\ew (The 
Texas Companvl : Ceneral Mills Today (General 
Mills, Inc. I : Paintinp with A v/"n (duPonI Com- 
pany I ; Letter to a Pilot ( Trans-\^'orld .\irlinesl ; 
This Gracious Heritage (Gorham Company) ; 
Horizons Unlimited (.-Xutomobile Manufacturers 
.-Xssociation I : .4 for .Achievement (Savings Bank 
.Association of .New York I : The Spud and You 
(National .-Vssocialion of Food Chains i; Heri- 
tage of Service (National S<-li-<-ted Morticians) ; 
Whistle in the .\ight ( .-Xssixriation of American 
Railroads). 

(See mention in film awards section) 



KollKKI ^ \IIN \l I F^ICHIK 

Phiidi ( rioNs, l\«:. 

9 West 61 si Street 
New Y..rk 23. N. Y. 

Phone: Circle «MI1<)1 

Dale of Organization: 1939 

Branch: .30<) Oil and l^a« Building. Houston. 
Texas. Phone: Klackstone St71. 

OFFK ERS AND DEPXRTMENT HEADS 
RolM-rt ^ arnall Richie. Pretitlent 

Mall Farrell, I ice President, Gen. Mgr. 

(amstance Binford. Secretary -Treasurer 
F. \\ . BrvanI, Jr., lice President 

Hugh F. (iage, I ice Piesulenl (Sales I 

Services: Motion pictures, slidefilms and still 
phologrnpln. black and while or color, scripting 
and slorv board treatnienl«. ('ounsel on di<lri. 
bution. 

Fi< |I.ITIE>: Camera. Iigliluig and nliting equip- 
ment. re<-ording set. up. liMalion truck and 
niixlel animation deparlnienl; staff writers and 

dirf^tors i/ji/i/ii: rttntintirti nn next tMii-r-t 



NUMBER 2 • \ O LI M E I J • I 9 .) 1 



41 



XKW VOIIK I ITY 



Robfrt Ynrnall Kic/ii'r; (.niilinind 

RKCENT PRODI nioNS AM) SI'ONSOKS 
.\eptune's (HI Fielils i ki-rr-MclJit- Oil Inclus- 
Irifs, Iiu-.l; Our Silent I'arliier i Kasl Ohin Gas 
Conipanv I : Annual Report (Slu'll Oil llimi- 
paiiy ) ; Linking America ( Peoples Gas l.iplit & 
Coke ('iiiiipaiiv i ; Prohlem. Solution. Result 
(Hercules I'liMtler C'.»iiipaii\ l ; .\atural das Pio- 
neer (Panhandle Eastern Pip«' Line Company I. 

(See riii'niion in film awards seilii>rO 



Leslie Roish Pnooi ctions. Inc. 

333 W . r.2n<l Si reel 

New York 1'). N. V. 

Phone: COlumhus 3-6430 

Date of Organization: 19H 

Studio and Shops: 13(1 Herrieks Koad, 

Miue.da. L. I.. N. Y. 

0FKK:EKS AM) DKI'ARTMENT HKADS 

Leslie M. Housh. President 

Jules K. Sindie. / ./'. Charles I). Elms. Slide films 

Services: .Motion pictures and slidefilnis from 
original idea to finished product. 

Facilitie.s: Equipment and staff for any type 
production, uithout rentals: sound studio in 
Mineola: art. animation, projection room in 
New York. 

RECENT PRODI CTION.S AND SPONSORS 

Institutional and |)ul)lic relations films for large 
industrial clients; L .S. Navy training films; tele- 
vision spots. 



* ♦ ♦ 

Sarra. 1m. 2(H> E. ,S0lh St.. New ^ork 22, 

N. Y. Phone: Ml rray Hill 8-0085. 
Valentino Sarra, President: Morris Behrend. 
General Manager, and full staff for produc- 
tion located at N. \'. studios, (.see listing 
under Chicago. Illinois) 



SkaBOVKI) StIDIOs. 1.N( . 

l.iT E. 69th Street 

New York 2L .\. Y. 

Phone: REgent 7-92(H) 



-Ala.n .Shii.in Pkodi ( tjons 

450 \\ . .i6th Street 

New York 19. N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-1270 



Fi.ET(.iiKK Smith Sti digs. Inc. 

321 E. 4Uh Street 

Ne», "^..rk 17. N. Y. 

J'lion.-: Ml rruN Hill .i-6626 

SCIt.NCE PiCTLKES, l.NC. 

.S E. .i7tli Street 

New York 22. N.Y. 

Phone: PLaza 9-8.i32 

Hranch: 1737 "H" St. NW, Washington 6. 

Phone: EXeciitiv.- 1092 

OFFICERS AM) DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Rene Bras. President 
Francis C. Thayer, I'. P. and Treas. 

Melville F. Wallace, Secretary 
John H. I^wis, Production Supervisor 



Srit-nrr Pirtiirrs: C.oiitiiuiftl 

.Services: Motion pictures and slidefilnis for 
liusiness. education and television. 

Facilities: Two studios, 16mm and 3.Smm cam- 
eras, two animation stands, projection room, twt) 
lulling rooms, art department, machine shop, 
pati'iiled composite unit for magnified first per- 
son photograplu. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Filmslrip series I Life Magazine): Grant Wood 
I Doi umeiilary I : The Market Everybody Wants 
I Dell l'u|p|i<ali(>ns. Inc. I: Annuid Report ( Pit- 
ncN-Uuwes. Inc.) : Patented Paint Brushes (Han- 
Ion & Goodman. Inc.) : Candid Supermarket 
Study (Good Housekeeping Magazine). 



* * * 

Sound Masters. Inc. 

16.5 West 46th Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: PLaza 7-6600 

Date of Organization: 1937 

OKI'ICERS AM) DKI'VHTMENT HEADS 

W. French Githens, Chairman 

Harold E. Wondsel. President 

Francis Carter Wood. Jr.. f ice Pres. and Sect)'. 

Walter Kullberg. Treasurer 

Roy Gibson. Writer-Director 

Harold .McCracken. George C. .Vlaloney. Writers 

Services: Motion pictures and slidefihns. Spe- 
cialties: technical and cartoon animation, loca- 
tion work. 

Facilities: 16mm and 35mm equipment, in- 
cluding sets, sound recording, camera, lighting, 
location trucks. 

RECENT PRODLCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Designs For A Homemaker (International Silver 
Conipanv I : Sporting Arms and Ammunition 
(Oiin Industries): Counted Pieces That Count 
(Western Brass Mills): Shooting Safety (Sport- 
ing Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Insti- 
tute) : Fishing For Fun (Fisher Body Division) ; 
Telephone Cable to Cuba ( American Telephone 
Ji Telegraph Co.) : ^'ational Folk Festival (L. S. 
State Department): An American Father (U.S. 
State Department): Kentile Production (Ken- 
tile, Inc. 1; Customer's Viewpoint (Tide Water 
Associated Oil Company) ; TV commercials. 

I See mention in film awards section i 



Special Plrpose Films, Inc. 

44 West 56tli Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

Phone: Jld.son 6-0020 

Date of Organization: 1946 

nniCERS \ND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

John lo\. President 

William Forest Crouch, Exec. Prod. Dir. 

Douglas Miller. Secretary 

J. .S. K. Hammaim. Sales Manager 

Gladys Brothers. Film Editor 

Mary R. Blake. Stylist 

Services: All tvpes of motion pictures. Special- 



Spriiiil Purpose Films: Continued 

ists in films for television, from 20-second com- 
inereials to one-hour packages. 

HKCENT PRODI ( TIONS AND SPONSORS 
Lutheran Hour (Lutheran Lawmen's U-aguel: 
Metropolis ( Documi-ntary ) ; An open end TV 
package series; TV commercials for Procter & 
Gand)le. Old Golds. Silvercup Bread. Playtex 
Girdles. Bower\ Bank. Sealtest lee Cream, North 
American Phillips, and olhi-rs. 



* •» ♦ 

Stlrgis-Grant Pkodlctio.ns. Inc. 

314 East 46th .Street 

New York 17. N. Y. 

Phone: Mlrray Hill 9-4994 

Date of Organization: 1948 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Warren .Sturgis. President. Prod. Mgr. 

Dwinell Grant. / ice President. Art Dir. 

.M. C. Romilh, .Sec.-7>ea.s., Bus. Mgr. 

Harry A. Hamsel, Chief Animator 

Services: Educational and technical films and 
filnistrips in the medical and scientific fields; 
animation of all types. 

Facilities: Live action and animation camera 
crews trained for medical and surgical work; 
16mm equipment: studio: sets; editing; medi- 
cal and scientific script writing staff. 

RECENT PRODLCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

The Embryology of the Eye ( ,\merican Academy 
of Ophthalmology ) ; The Male Sex Hormone 
( Schering Corp. ) : Migraine — //5 Diagnosis and 
Treatment ( Sandoz Pharmaceuticals) ; From 
One Cell (The American Cancer Society); The 
Bone Bank (New Y'ork Society for the Relief 
of the Ruptured and Crippled) ; Surgical Treat- 
ment for Patent-Ductus Arteriosus (Columbia- 
PresliNterian Medical Center; Pyloromyotomy 
for Infanlile-Pyloric Stenosis ( St. Clare's Hos- 
pital I . 

John Sutheruvnd Prodlctions. Inc., 60 E. 
42nd Street. New York 17. N.Y. Phone: 
Ml rray Hill 7-7815. Ross Sutherland. 

(Coniplete lisliiig in l.os Angeles section) 

ToMLiN Film Prodictions 

480 Lexington Avenue 

New York 17. N.Y. 

Phone: PLaza 8-2827 

I S,.,. inenlion in film awards se<tion) 



Traimnc Films. Inc. 

150 West 54tli Street 

New York 19, N. Y. 

I'hone: COIund.iis 5-3520 

Date of Organization: 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Ralph Bell Fuller. President. Prod. Mgr. 

HoI.erl A. Lighthurn. f. P. (Development) 

Henry Morle\. Nat Zurker: M.P. Div. Chiefs 

Karl lleitz. Office Manager 

Elwood .M. Frye. Art Director 

VS'illiam Leftwich. Dir.. Still Photography 

.'Mlilialed with l)>namic Films. Inc.. 112 West 
89th Street, New York Cil\ 21. Phone: TRafal- 
"ar 3.6221. 



42 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAt;AZINE 



Trainiitf! Films: Cuntinut'd 

Srrvicrs: Visual presentation services, consul- 
lutiiin. visual equipnient. (iistrihution. uil fur 
iiDokli'ts. leader guides, and posters. 

Kaciuties: .Still photography department, proc- 
essing for lilack and uliitc and color: sound 
studios, animation, high speed, time and motion: 
creative department for research and script writ- 
ing; art department: consultation service. 

RECENT PRODI C.TION.S .AND .SPONSORS 
Talk. Talk. Talk i The Horden Clompain I : l'a\ 
Din I I'urolator I'roducts. Inc. I: .South Africa 
I Life Magazine!: From Science. I\ew Beauty 
I James Lees \ Sons Co. I : Control oj Mastitis 
I Lederle Lahoratories) : The Story of Lastex 
( I . S. Kuldier Compain I : Companion Merchan- 
ilisinfi I Personal Products Corporation!: The 
Cariio That I'ay.s Off (Associated Transport, 
Inc. I: Help Ifanteil I Procter 4i (iainlile) : 

{round South America ( Pan .American World 

\irwavs. Inc. I, 

Tra.nshi.m Incokpohatki) 

3.1 W . I.illi Street 

New York l<>. N.^ . 

Phone: LI xeinhurg 2-1 KHJ 

Date of Organization: 1941 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

William Miesegacs. I'resident 

Walter Lowendahl. Executive l ice President 

William Burnham. T. P. (Sales) 

Peter Schlenker. Treas. 

.Sekvicks: Staff of 'X) in departments co\ering 
production of motion pictures, slidciilms and 
still photography. 

Facilities: .Studios, shops and offices all in 
Transfilm Building. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPON.SORS 

///). Zip. Hooray (The Spool Cotton Company) : 
Make Um for \ outh (National .Social Vielfare 
\ssemlily I : U heel Sense ( StudehakiT Cori«»ra- 
tionl: Men of Gloucester (Ford .Motor Com- 
pany I . 

(Sec mridioM in flini awards -ieclloni 

Unifilms 

n\ E. JTth Street 
New York 17. N. Y. 

I'lio,.. : Ml ir.iN III!! H-'»H2-, 

Video Varieties C.ohpoh \ iion 

41 Kast .ittlli Street 

New York 22. \. Y. 

Phone: Ml rrav Mill HI W.2 

(►wniT and (Ipcralor of W c«l ( ioast 

Sound Sludior.. .'>|l) \\ e-l .')Tlh Street, 

Ne« York IV. estaldi-.lied in l')V2 

Date of Organization: 1948 

OFFICERS AM) l)KI'\HT\IFNT IIK\1>^ 

(ieorge \\ . (ioman. Pri'stdcnt 

Martin Henry and A. W. Manchei- 

in Charpe of I'roductii-n 

L<-onar(l Antlerson. Cuttiufi Rooms, Editing 

Otis P. Williams. General Sales Manat^er 

>krv|(:ks: Industrial motion pictures and slide- 
films: tele\i>ion hhn shows and conunercials. 

Fvcii.iTiE.s: Studio ei|uip|M-d with RCA sound; 
lighting and camera e(|uipment; set conslrue- 
lion shops; television shipping, labeling nn<l in- 
sp<Hiion department. 



I iili'o I ariftifs: ('ontiiiiii-d 
RECENT PRODI CTIONS AM) >PONSt»RS 
Containers in the Makinp (Kieckhefcr Container 
Oimpany I : More Time for Livin/; (Westing- 
house Klectric (!orporation I : Hetty Crocker 
((General Mills, hii. I: U hat's Cookinfcy ( Philco 
(.orporalion I : Tehnision commercial-: series 
for (.eneral Klcdric (!onipan\ for Fred Waring 

program and dealers: Schlitz Brewing C! paii\ 

for Pulit/er Prize Pla\house program; Bulo\a 
Watch Company. The Borden (!ompain. (ien- 
cral Foods C!om|ian\ . 



* « * 

\\ ildiiig f'irliire I'rndiiitioii-. Inc. 
WlUJl.Nl, ruilKK PllOUKTlO.Ns. In(... iUo .Madi- 
son Avenue. New York, N.Y. Phone: Pl^za 
8-1727. J. W. Inglefield. vice president. 

(See complete listing under Chicago. III. I 



\\ ll.I.AKI) l'l( 1 I HKS, l.NC. 
!.'> Wot l.^th Street 
New York 19. N. Y. 
Phone: H xendiurg 2-<tl.Sn 
Dal.' of Organization: IV;12 
Brani li Otlice: Fditorial. (.iutling. Projection. Re- 
cording, .Animation: .5.50 Fifth Avenue. 
New Y'ork Cit> 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

T. W. Willard. President 

John .M. S(|uiers. Jr.. lice Pres., Gen. Mfir. 

Services: Industrial, medical, educational, sales 
and joli training motion pictures and slidefdms; 
training fdms for l. S. Armed Forces and Cov- 
ertimciilal agencies; theatricals: television film 
shows and ci>mmercials. 

Facilities: Mitchell NC cameras ami camera- 
top station wagons, portable generators, field 
sound reroriling instruments: pioneer in indus- 
try te<'hni'|ues and e(|uipment; color production 
in Kast and South America for theatrical pri>- 
ducers; animation department; projection and 
cutting rooms: creatixe staff. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS A.M) .sPt)NM»K.s 
Fabrication of a \ylon Creel ( E. I. duPonI de 
NenioursI: /. H. M. (International Business Ma- 
chines); Operation Fast Frrit^ht I Norfolk ^ 
W eslcrn Bailwa) I : .Screen Reiieus ( American 
lelephone & Telegraph (!ompan\ I ; Machine 
Shoemakin/: I Inited Shoe Machinery); That 
Your Children 4/n> Live (('hildren's Medical 
(!enler ( amfiaign \r und I ; Aaculru ( I iiiled Fruit i . 



« « « 

Bu'ii\n C. W«)i.KK Srinnis. |.5.< K. 4,5th Stn-f-l, 

New York 17. NY PI. PI./, -.-.i.-u. 

Dicran Nahigian. 
tConiplrle listing ui Los Angeles sci tion i 



Kmkhhon ^«ikkk Sti III«» 

:\\.\ W. .'.2n.l St reel 
New York 1'). \ V 

Enirrson ^ orke. Prrtidrnt 



>iiiMii.i<: \ii.\.\'Tii 



>«•« .li'rN«*v 

« « * 

The pKi.NCFrroN I iim (Ienter, I.nc. 

Princeton. New JerM»v 
Phone: .3.5.50 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEAD> 

(iordon Knox. President 

L. II. M..lt<>n. Production Manaper 

Alfre<l F. (iaiifano. Business Mananer 

Sumner I.Non. Scenarist 

HoU-rt Wel.h. Film Editor 

Carlo .Arcamone, Film Editor 

.ServicE-S: Production and distrihution of s|h-- 
> ial-pur)Mise spons<ired motion pictures for ten 
\i-ars; films for civic relations organizations, 
medical as.«<M'ialions, universilirs; production in 
I .S. and South America. 

FACILITiE,s: 16mm anil .'iSnnn <an)eras: sound 
stage. Western Kli-ctric sound s>slein. mobile 
sound location Iruck. mobile generator. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
The Story of Ted Mcl.ane ( International Chiro- 
praclors A.s.siM'iation i : Forfiet Sot These Chil- 
dren I Department of institute and Agencii-s of 
Slate of .New Jcrse\ ) ; Quality Mill i Riverside 
Metal Company ) ; Fortress of the Sh\ ( li<M-ing 
.Aircraft Corporation i : The kinp Means Business 
l^ale i. Townc Manufacturing C<>mpan> I ; Op- 
eration Fripid i\a\r \ Townel; Here's Your 
Worksaver i^ali- \ Town.-i. 



.Xt'M I'tirk .Siiii<> 

McI.ARTV PlCTl RE PkoHI CTIONS 

4.5-47 Slanle\ Sir.-et 

Buffalo (>. New ^ork 

Phone: I a> h.r 03.32 

Date of Urgani/ation: 1934 

OFFICERS AM) DFPVKTMFNT HEADS 

Il.nr> D. Mcl^irt\. ihiner and Prixtucer 

M. (iliarli-s Link... l.hiej Cameraman 

ll.'len .\L Bra\man. Editorial Department Chief 

RolH-rt Hit-ske. Chief Electrician 

.ServicE-S: Exclusivel) Ihmni industrial, scien- 
lifi. and i-ducalional rdni- and high tiN^-al re- 
st-arch photograph\ ; Kinun sh.>rt subjecls and 
s|M>ls for television. 

F\ciLiTiKS: F.(|uipmcnt f..r Kinun hims. anima- 
tion and high s|Mvd ph.it. .graph) ; Kunm .Maurer 
recording; mobile unit for rrnioir camera and 
sounil Work. 

RE( ENT PRODMmoNS AND SPtlNSOR.S 
The Story of Ohio Leather (The Ohi.> l>ealher 
l!om|>an>l: The iMmson Story (The Lanison 
('.>r|Hiralion) ; The iMmson Automatic Hallri 
l.imder (The !.amM>n Coqx.ralion I : Gel th> 
Luhrication and ) ou Gel the .Service (The Ken 
liall Berining (!i.mpnn\ I : Informalum at ITork 
' III.' I.l\l"f In-triirnt-iit ("iiliiiMh i.-* "' . 



K111..I I MiilU III M-. 

ilead<|uarliT<: ll.iiid.iirg B3. New ^ ork 

Phone Fl<..nlirr .3K7«. 

Slu.llo: 12 Pearl Slr.el. Biiff.ih. 2. New ^ i.rk 

Ph..ne MOhawk 3312 

Date of Organi«alion: l()tO 

E»eretl K. R.M|uemorr. Director and Manafer 



NI MHFR .' • \OI. I MK i: • 1 ") :. I 



43 



MIIMILK ATLAMir 



R(><lii)'iii<irr Films: I'.imtinuvd 
Servicks: Industrial luulioii piiturcs. Idimii 
color or sound, |msl-narrali'd: television com- 
mercials. 

Faciutifs: M-K stiuiiii rivordcr: portaliji- gen- 
erator: Hollywood lighting: studio floating wails, 
dollies, "mike" liooin; trailer: s<ri|>t writing: 
lilirar\ of recorded music and sound ellects. 

RKl.ENT I'RODl'CTIONS AMI Sl'ONSOHS 
Hirt-'s Hon I Kedfi.rd Pr.>dii(tsl: Ki-rncl Mult 
(Me\er Malt and (iraiii ("oni|>an\ 1 ; Lei's Slop 
Those Leaks ( l.olilau Croielerias. IncJ : Dun- 
kirk at MiilCenliin ( Dunkirk. Cliamber of Com- 
merce) ; Portable Grandstands (Snyder Tank 
Corporation* : Let's Co to Press (Morrison Steel 
Products Company): llercAlloy Chains (Co- 
lumbus Mrkimion Chain Corporation): Cruis- 
ers of Tomorrow (Kichardson lioat Company); 
TV shows and commercials. 

I't'liiiMvlvaiiiii 

* * * 

DkFrKNKS (loMl'ANY 

1909-1 1 ]{iiItonwoo<l Street 

I'liilailelpliia 30. Pen^^\ Ivania 

I'lionc: KIttenliouse 6-1686 

Date of Organization: 1916 

Joseph DeF'renes, President 

General Manager 

Services: Sound films for education, training, 
medical and surgery, employe relations and in- 
centive, public relations, safety, documentary, 
industrial and commercial, including television. 

Facilitiks: 16nmi and .35mm cameras, record- 
ing, editing; sound stage, R.C.A. sound system, 
including 35mm dubbcrs. 35mm tape recorder: 
projectors; film vault; animation equipment and 
staff, technical and cartoon; cutting room; cre- 
ative staff. 

RECEM I'ROULCTIONS AM) SPONSORS 
Fire Upon the Earth (Westminster Press-Pres- 
byterian Church): A Salute to Mother (Esskay 
Company) : The Air Force Flight Surgeon (U.S. 
Army Signal Corps) : Tolserol in the Treatment 
of Rheumatic Diseases (E. R. Squibb & Sons) ; 
Fresh As a Daisy (C. V. Hill & Company) ; Ve- 
hicle Operator Training I and II (U.S. Air 
Force t; The KeaJiiig Full-Fashioned Knitting 
Machine (Textile Machine Works I: training 
films for U.S. Navy: six educational short sub- 
jects for R.C.A. : Giant Voice, Radio at Work, 
Eyes over the World, A'eu' Worlds, Behind the 
Screens. The Magic Carpet; TV commercials. 

(See mention in film awards section) 

llvTIlKN I'iKiUl {.HON-, 

264 .So. Van Pell Street 

Philadelphia. Penn«vl\ania 

News Reel Laboratory 

1733 Sumsom Street 
Philadelphia 3. Pennsylvania 

>\ Ki.su Sti OIOS 

1209-11 K. Chelten Avenue 

Philadrlpliia 3K. Pennsylvania 



* * * 

Moi)k-.\hi PicTi'RES. Inc. 

1022 I'orI.e- Street 
Pilt-liiir^li 19, Pennsylvania 

Phones: Express 1-1816-17-18-19 

Date of Organization: 1938 

(H I IllKKS AM) l)i:i'ARTMK,NT IIKADS 

James L. Baker, President 

Robert I,. Sliiiie. Executive lice President 

Barney B. Riigan. \ ice President 

Florence E. Baker, Secretary-Treasurer 

Skrvices: Producer <if 16mm anil 35mni indus- 
trial, educatiiinal. adM-rtising and television 
(dins, black and whili' and color: 35iniii slide- 
lilms. Also distributer of lOnnn and 35mm 
films. 

Facilitiks: Recording and television studios; 
Mitchell, Maurer. and Akelev single system cam- 
era equipment; RCA 35nHn magnetic sound 
system, 35 and 16mm photographic sound: cut- 
ting rooms with Moviola 35nnn and 16mm. 
RKCF.NT I'RODl CTIONS AM) SPONSORS 
The Fijili Freedom ( Allegheny-Ludlum Steel 
Corporation ) ; High Power Laboratory Testing 
(Westinghouse Electric Corporation) ; Fabulous 
Honduras (Gulf Oil Corporation) ; The Log oj 
the Alvee (Gulf Oil Corporation): The Manu- 
factures of Stainless Bars and W ire I Allegheny- 
Ludlum Steel Corporation). 

(See mention in film awards section) 

Wa!>>liin^l«»ii. it. r. 

* M *. 

Byron. Incorporated 

1226 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. 

Washington 7, D. C. 

Phone: DuPont 1800 

Date of Organization: 1938 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Byron Roudabush, President 

E. M. Russey. Vice President 

Robert Pilgrim. Treasurer 

Peter J, Agnew, Secretary 

Services: 16mm sales promotion motion pic- 
tures for industries, and training films for U.S. 
Armed Forces and Government agencies; tele- 
vision commercials. 

Facilities: Studio and lahoratorv with sound 
stage, magnetic and negative-positive recording 
and dubbing; color printing: art and animation 
departments, script writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Establishing Primary Control (Hydrographic 
Office of the U.S. Navy) : Secondary Control 
and Hydrographic Development (Hydrographic 
Office of the U.S. Navy I ; See Cassidy (Koppers 
Company); Complete Dentures -- Alginate Im- 
pressions I iS'aval Dental School, Bethesda, Md.) ; 
Partial Dentures — Bio-Mechanics ( Naval Dental 
School! ; Complicated Exodonlia — Introduction 
(Naval Dental School); Topside Painting — 
Preparation I Bureau of Ships, U.S. Navy) : Top- 
side Painting — Application (Bureau of Ships). 

« « •► 

Tilt Ja.m IIami^ Ohi.v.mzation, I.nc. .514 
Transportation Building, Washington 6, D.C. 
Phone: District 0611. Harry Watts, in charge. 
(Complete listing under Detroit. Mich.) 



SOI Til K AST 



4M'«»r^iii 

« « -f 

(iiiARi.is i). Hi i;i.\M) (Company 

\\ alton Building 
Atlanta 3, Georgia 

Phone: WMnnI 0892 

Date of Organization: 1938 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

C. D. Beeland. Ouner 

H. L. (Chick) Wilson. Sales Manager 

Kliii., Kills and Bradb.rd Crandall. Jr.. Writers 

C. Ed Bangs. Film Editor 

C. I). Beeland, L. E. McCumber, V. A. Lambert. 

Cameramen 

Elizabeth Beeland. Makeup 

l-'rnest Bangs. Electrical Supervisor 

Phillij) C. Bangs. Sound Engineer 

Services: Motion pictures on sales promotion 
and training, public and civic relations; theatri- 
cal anri television short subjects. 

Facilities: 16mm ami 35mm cameras; light- 
ing; magnetic film, optical film and disc record- 
ing: aerial motion picture photography: creative 
staff, title department, editing and cutting rooms; 
narration, music. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Power of the South (The Southern Company) ; 
The Outslate Story (Consumers Power Com- 
pany of Michigan) ; Presenting the Brock Bust- 
ers (series for Brock Candy Company) : Lnder- 
ground Army (Orkin Exterminating Company) ; 
Responsibility (Jefferson .Mills) : other current 
titles: Highland Heritage. Partners in Progress, 
Potver to Save the World. Story of a .Stocking, 
Christ — The Only Answer, Pattern for Progress, 
Pay-Day — Someday, Wings to New York, 



Strickland Film Company 

220 Pharr Road, N.E. 

Atlanta. (Georgia 

Phone: (Hlerokee 5317 

Date of Organization: 1920 

OFFICERS AND DEPART.MENT HEADS 

Robert B. Strickland, President 

Robert B. Holm. \ ice President 

C. L. Strickland, Secretary -Treasurer 

Eugene Erwin. Sales Manager 
Seymour Black. Laboratory Manager 

Oscar Barber. Sound Engineer 
W. R. Burdette, Production Manager 

Services: Industrial and civic relations motion 
pictures, 16mm and 35mm. sound, color. 

Facilities: Sound stage and lighting; Maurer 
camera, dollies; Maurer sound recording system, 
playback tape recorder, 35mm recording equip- 
ment: 35mm studio camera: 35mm developing 
machine: three I6nnn developing machines; 
Eastman edge numbering machine: Densito- 
metric and Sensitometric controb; color print- 
ing; editing and projection rooms. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Golf Highlights (Women's National Amateur 
(Jolf Tournament): Fifty Years of Refreshment 
(Atlanta Coca-Cola Bottling Company): Green 
Gold (Georgia Power Company) ; From Chips 
to Nuts (Gordon Foods) ; Through Lincoln 
(-(lie (Tuskegee Institute). 



44 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



K«>nlu<-kv 



Buckeye Motion Pictlre Producers 

(Division of (Ihak.-Kv. Prod. Co.) 

I'.o. Box VI 

\\ ilmoro. Ki-iilurkv 

I'liono: 4754 

niito of Or^aiiiziilion: M>IK (iiH)liioi 

l.«»uiNisiiisi 

« ♦ * 

(loMMI-.RCK PlCTl RES 

525-527 ^oy<lra^ Slr«<-I. I'.O. Hox 152 

New Orlraii-. Louisiana 

Phoue: .M Ajiiiolia 5(t26 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Rohert W'icgaiid. President 

Robert N. Wirgarul. Research, Scenarios 

Walter Hack, Production Rohert Lawton, Sound 

G. Maher. Laboratory 

Services: 16tnm industrial, educational and 
travel films: .'^Siiuii theatre short suhjccts, news 
and sports, and advertising films: television ad- 
vertising. 

F"A( II.ITIES: Studios anil sound stages: specializ- 
ing in sound-on-film. double system; projection 
room; laboratory with Bell and Howell printer 
and continuous process developing machine: film 
vault: creative stall. 

recent I'RonrcTioNS and sponsors 

I'an-.im Faces the Future ( I'an-Am Southern 
Corporation I ; The Ship ( Delta Line, New Or- 
leans) : Shield of Our Freedom (Louisiana Civil 
Service league) : Les Jardins de Mouton (Rob- 
ert MoulonI; A Better Way oj Living (Park- 
chester. Inc.). 



HarFii.ms, Inc. 

600 Baronne .'Street 
New Orleans 12, I^<iiiisiaiia 

Phone: Maf:nolia 1741 
OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
A. Harrison, Jr., President 
Frank J. Richard, lice President 
R. Harrison, Secretary-Treasurer 
J. M. Leitlaru'. (.hiej Cameraman 
J. (!. Little, Recording Engineer 
W . Rivet, Laboratory Technician 

.'^^;KVl(.K.s: Industrial. aiUcrtising and educa- 
tional films, sound and <-olor. 

Facilitie.s: 16mm and .35mm cameras: 16mm 
sound recording <-<|uiprnrnt: Idiiim an<l .'{.Smm 
editing and laboratory: limited animation facili- 
ties; titling, color duplicating: laboratory serv- 
ices for own account and other producers; rental 
and sales of ei|uip[nent: C.V.. Mazda lamps; en- 
tertainment rental films library; films for class- 



.\orlli < aroliiiii 

ll<ii.i.\>Mii II I'kiikks. Inc. 

HM) .S>. Clilirrh Sirrel 
(^harlolle. N. C. 

Phone: W^V.Wl, t-ll27 

D.ite of Organi/ation: I'XO 

Holly Smith, President 

Services: 16nun industrial, travel, civic rein- 



Hollysmilh I'lrlitn-s: Continued 

lions, and documentarv motion pictures; color; 
35mm coverage, no titling: sound slidefilms; 
television spots antl entertainment films. 

Facilities: Sound studio, disc, film and tape 
re<ording. including Ranger synchronous; ani- 
mation; \laurer camera and recorder. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Time Is Money an<l Sales Conference, both for 
The American Thread Company: 77iij Peanut 
Business (Lame. Ini. I : Myrtle lieach, S.C. 
• Nhrtle Iteach Chandler of (!-iinnicriet . 

'l'<'IIII«>.<l>N«-<* 

Sam Orlea.ns and Associates. Inc. 

211 \\ . Ciiinberland Avenue 
Knowille 1."), Jerine-see 

Phone-: .3-8098 and 4-1301 

Dale of Organization: l'>46 
Sam P. Orleans. Executive 

Services: Motion pictures for industry and 
.•\rmed Forces: public relations and training 
films; television. 

F"acilities: Studio with production equipment; 
editing and reconling in Chicago or New York. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Engineering for Radio Isotopes i Union Carbide 
and Carbon Corporation) : Share the Fun 
Breakfast ( Inited States Rubber Company): 
Engineering for Economy ( I'nilcd States Wliole- 
sale Grocers Association!: traiiiiiii; film for 
I .S. \ir Fnr.r. 



Iniliaiin 



EAST t K.MItAL 



Galbreath Picture Productions 

2(M).'. Fairfiibl Street 
Fort \\ a\ ne d. Indiana 



(il.VUKNi I II. (>l I HIMI I II 

n(t7 Driirv Lane 
' orl W .i\ lie 'i. liidi:ina 

K \M> S III M-.. Inc. 

50 North W e-l Street 
lndianap(di>. Indiana 

I'iione: RMev .3<)»l 

Date of Orgaiii/alioii: 1946 

OFFICERS \NI) DEPVRTMFNT HEVDS 

Jack R. Rubius, President 

John H. Rabius, /'ire President 

Sehvk Ks: Kimm sound and color industrial and 
training motion pictures. ;ind «lldrfilinv; tele- 
vision commercial.*. 

F'acII.ITIKS: Nfaurer Km '<|uipnient: anima- 
tion department: s<ripl-w riling contracted. 

HKCENT PRODI CTIONS AND .SPONSORS 
Disassembly Cummins Engine ( Cunmiiii.i Knginc 
(^oni|Miny. sli<lefilm I : Assembly Cummins En- 
gine (Cunnnins Lngine (!onipnn\. slidefilm) : 
Welcome Diamond Chainers ( lliamond Chain 
('ompany. slidefilm I : Aircraft Heaters (Stewart- 
\X'arner Conipanv, slidefilm); Suburltanite for 
Easier Living ( Fjiglesfield Tractor Com|>any). 

.Nollllls >MI1II\ I'llnlil < IIONs 

Sliellliorn Ho.id. Route No. 9 

l-'ori W a\ ne, Indiana 



<»hio 

« « « 

Caravel Fil.ms. Inc. .\dilre>,-. \ i-uai Methods, 
Inc., 336 Second National Building. Akron, 
Ohio. (See complete listing on page 39.) 

(^i.M.(.it\i I I'hodi ( ii(>n». Im . 

251.'! Franklin \\eniie 

Cleveland 13. Ohio 

Phone: SLperior l-23INt 

Date of Organization: 1939 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEAD> 

Rav (!ullev. President 

Robert F. Ilavilaiid. M. P. Producer 

Llton Hi-tcher. Slidefilm Producer 

Rol>ert Wclchans, Director 

Harry Horrm'ks, Chief Cameraman 

Paul Culley, Chief Sound Engineer 

Rol>ert Mowrv, Art Director 

Ed I'errv . Stills and Animation 

Cbarli-s Tilth. Stage Director 

Christine Hofstetter, Office .Manager 

Services: Industrial sales and job training mo- 
tion pictures and slidefilms; civic relations films. 

FAril.lTIES: Pioneer in 3.camera le<-hnique with 
own Cini-si-ope for svnchronized sound in color 
and black and whili-: sound stage, blimps, dol- 
lies, .M & R booms; lloating studios for record- 
ing; still and animation departments; art and 
creative staffs. 

RECF;NT PRODI CTIONS AND .M'ON.->t)RS 
Food Is Fun (The American Gas Association); 
Penny-Wise Guy on Mulberry Street ( S«'ilK'rling 
Rubber Company t ; // Didn't lust Happen 
(\Sestinghous<- Maimfacturing ('ompanv ) ; 5eic 
Ip That Sale i Domestic S<-»» ing Machine Com- 
pany); Postscript from Tommy (Y.M.CA.); 
Let's Explore Ohio (Standard Oil Company of 
Ohio I : A Day at the Federal Reserve Bank 
( Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland I ; First 
Ferguson Trarlor ( Harrv Fi-rgu'iml. 

« « « 

EscAH Motion Picti re Service 

7315 ("uriiegie \\cniie 

Cleveland 3, ( Miio 

Phone: Kndieott 1-2707 

Date of Organization: 1912 

Ernest S. CaqH-nter, President 

Services: 16mm and 35nini industrial training 
and promotional, advertising and educational 
filmstrips, Miund. silent: black \ white, color. 

Faciutii-s: 16nini and 35nim sound recording 
studio and prixessing Uboratorv; optical rr<luc- 
lion printing: Idniin and 35nim laci|uer coating: 
color printing: animation; rrrativr stafT. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SI^ONSORS 
The Art of Reaming (Cleveland Twist Drill 
(^ini|Minyl; \orge Bloi-k Parl\ ( Norgc Com- 
panv I ; The L'ses and Abuses of the Tutsi Drill 
tCIeveland Twist Drill Company). 



TiiK JvM il\M>\ om.vM/viiio. Im... .510 Tab 
bolt Kuililing. Davton 2. Ohio. Phone: .\Dams 
6289. ,\. M. SimpMin, in charge. 
(G>m|Jete listing under Detroit, Mich." 



Nl .M HER : • \ ») I I M E 12 • I •» i 1 



4S 



EAST lE.MIKAL 



4»liio 

« « « 

Hkkt Joiinmon I'liom t ri<».N>. 1m;. 

R2M Blue A^li Kou.l 

Ciiiciiinali '.U>. (Hiio 

I'hoiif: S^ canior.- (>KHI 

Duto of ()r*;iiiii/.ution: l')44 

OFFICERS \M> ItKI'AKT.MKNT IIKADS 

IWrt Jnliiistiiii. {'resilient and Treasurer 

G. Girllon Hill. / iVc I'resident 

Mary J. Kenn. Secretary. Chief Director 

Glenn J<ihnslt>n. Director 

oj Camera and Sound DepartmerUs 

Servicks: Industritil and civic relations motion 
pictures. 16inin coKir. sound: sound slidefilnis. 

F\<:il.lTlKS: Maurcr camera c<|iii[)nicnt. figure 
aniniuliiin. Western Kleclric Iclianiiel mixing; 
console; exiensixc castirif; files: sets: editing, art 
and script deparlnienls. 

KKt.ENT PROUICTIONS AND .SPONSOR.S 
) ou Are \t\ \eiiilil)or ( Chamber of Commerce 1 : 
t'rossroads in the Sky I Cliambcr of Commerce ( : 
The I ein Is Rich I Union Central Life Insurance 
Company i ; More Power to You ( Crosley Divi- 
sion. AVCO Corporation I : I'rofils out of Space 
(Procter & Ganddel : plus television commer- 
cials. 

.MoriON I'll I L HI 1'HI(|)L( I lO.NS, l.N(. 

Rockefeller Building 

Sixth and Superior Streets. West 

Clevelan.l IS. Ohio 

Phone: PRo^pecl 1-4900 

Date of (trgani/.ation: 1932 

Incorporation: 1941 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
Donald C. Jones. I'resident 

Claude \. Rakestraw. / ice I'resident 

Sherman Rogers. I ice President, 

Research Director 

M. C. Jones. Secretary 

Robert f{. Carroll. Production Control 

Parker .Meyers. Sta^e Director 
M. A. Coolidge. Music Arrangements 

Services: Industrial, public, labor and civic re- 
lations motion pictures: sales training, television 
commercials. 

Kacilities: Mit<hell. Bell i Howell. Eymo and 
Akeiey .35mm cameras. Cine-Special 16mm 
cameras: simnd stage. 60 lights: R.C.A. 35nmi 
sound recorder. 33';; and ')i^ I!. P.M. scoring 
turntables. \an-t)pe truck for location: two Bell 
& Howell hot splicing tables, two 35mm Movi- 
olas and 16mm viewer, svnchronizers, two 35mm 
carbon arc projectors and 16mm projectors; 
proiessing laboratory, automatic 35mm and 
I6nun develo|M,-r and drying cabinet; art depart- 
ment: music and sound effects librarv; creative 
>tafl. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
l/en nnil Mollis (I,yn<hburg Foundry Corn- 
pan) I ; A Hospital Applies Better Methods 
(Cleveland Clinic Ho!>)>ital ) : Basic Methods of 
Automohile Reftnishinp (Sherwin-Williams Com- 
paiivl: Fruit of Paradise (remade in 1950 for 
Hawaiian Canneries ('otnpany * : Safety First 
and Aluays (Nickel Plate Railroad): Sow the 
Truth ( American Steel and Wire ('ompanyj ; 
School Diiw I Youngstown School Board j. 



« « « 

\\ (i.iiiNc Picture Productions, Inc., Enquirer 
Buililing. Cincituiati. Ohio. Phone: GArfield 
(1477. Jaincs l.aVlarr. branili manager. 

( (!uiii|ili-lr lisliiij; iiriilci ( !liic .i;;ii. Illirmi-i 

« * * 

\\i(.i)(N(. I'k (in(. I'ltoui i.Tio.N.s, Inc., 310 Swct- 
land Ruilding. Cleveland. Ohio. Phone: TOwcr 
1-6-1-Kl. Jack Rliciristrom. vice president. 

(Compli'lc lisliiif; uiiilcr Chicago. Illinois I 

llolroil. .>li«-lii|£]iii 

♦ * « 

1' I OKI/. KcOKI'OliAlll) 

(formerly \ isiial Training Corporation) 

815 Bates Street 

Detroit 26. Michigan 

Phone: WO 2-1920 

Date of Organization: 1931 

OFFICERS AND DEI'ARTMENT MEADS 

Genaro A. Florez. President 

Hans A. Erne. Executive I ice President 

Paul Kelcourse. Secretary-Treasurer, Gen. Mgr. 

J. Raymond Cooper, Gen. Prod. Mgr. 

John K. Kleene. Editorial Director 

Ray B. Helser, Dir. Specialty Services 

Services: Consultants, creators, producers for 
sales and service training, promotion and man- 
agement: product presentation: conventions and 
exhibits: employe and consumer relations: eco- 
nomics information. Planning and [jroducing 
slidefilnis. motion pictures, transparencies, Video- 
graph presentations, charts, recordings, models 
and exhibits, stage presentations, conventions, 
manuals, texts, questionnaires, house organs. 
Offering stock shots, a-v equipment, syndications. 

Facilitie.s: Equipment and personnel for re- 
search, copy. art. photography, animation, color 
duping, typesetting, printing. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
The Trout Fly Fable (Nash Motors) : Magic in 
tlie Air (Motorola) : Peanut Sam, the Business- 
man (syndicated. Arizona Power & Light): A 
Plug for Extra Business ( Champion Spark 
Plug ( : Right in Your Own Back Yard ( Stude- 
baker ) : For the Long Haul ( Gulf Oil ) : Blue- 
print for Action ( S. S. Kresge ) : Your American 
Beauty i \ash ) . 

IlE.N.M.Nt; AM) ClIEAni.E. l.NC. 

1060 W\ Fort Street 

Detroit 26. Micdiigan 

Phone: W Oodward 1-7691 

Branches: 33 E. 60th Street. New York. N. Y. 
Phone: TEmpleton <!-3()70. Charles Behymer. 
branch manager. 1140 So. Michigan Avenue. 
Chicago. Illinois. Phone: WAbash 2-0570. Al 
E. Johnson, branch manager. Coni|)lete photo- 
graphic |irocluc'lion. editorial and distribution 
services in each branch oHice. 
L. H. Henning. President 
George A. Cheadle. Vice President 
Services: Visual cast presentations: soundslide 
films: complete programs. 

Facilities: E(|uipment and stall for black and 
white. Ektachrome and color separation. 

RECENT PRODI (TIONS \NI) SPONSORS 
hour-day sales training program for llotpoint 
Commercial Cooking E(|uipment Division: visual 
cast and Transvuer presentation for Pure Oil. 



* * ♦ 

The Jam Ha.ndy Orcamzatio.n. Inc. 

2821 East (;rand Boulevard 

Detroit I I. Mic lii;:an 

I'honc: IRinity .')-24.iO 

Date of Organization : 1917 

Mkvnches: New York: 1775 Broadwav, New 
York 19. N.Y. Phone: Jldson 2-4060. Her- 
man (ioelz. in charge. Chicago: 230 N. .Michi- 
gan Avenue, Chicago 1, Illinois. Phone: STate 
2-6757. Tom R. Curtis, in charge. Washing- 
ton: .544 Transportation Building. Washington 
6. D.C. Phone: District 0611. llarr\ Walts, in 
charge. Dayton: 310 Talbot Building. Davton 
2. Ohio. Phone: ADams 6289. A. M. Simp- 
son, in charge. Los Angeles: 7046 Hollywood 
Boulevard, Los Angeles 28. California. Phone: 
HEmpstead 5809. (Service office, not sales. I 
Pittsburgh: 9,30-9.32 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh 
22. PciHis\lvania. Phone: EXpress 1-1840. Mac 
Campbell, in (barge. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Jamison Handy. President 

Oliver Horn. Executive Vice President 

John A. Campbell, V.P. (Training) 

Everett F. Schafer, V. P. (Service) 

George B. Finch, V.P. (Sales) 

William G. Luther, V.P. (Auto. Cont.) 

.Avery W^ Kinney, Secty. 

Allan E. Gedelman. Treas. 

Anne .Marie Jioffre. 

Director of Public Impressions 

Services: Motion pictures: commercial: indus- 
trial: sales training: customer, personnel and 
public relations: minute movies, three-minute 
screen advertisements, sponsored shorts, safetv, 
educational, health films: television commercials. 

Slidefilnis: Commercial, industrial, sales and 
shop training, customer and public relations, 
merchandising, record, cartoon, reading, chart, 
discussional. quiz, school study and health, 
safety, first aid. Glass slides, transparencies, 
slide racks, opaque materials. 

Facilities: Complete studio. Sound stage, re- 
cording, set construction, direction, casting, 
scene design, mock ups. miniatures, stage man- 
agement, field reconnaisance, animation studios. 
music direclion and orchestra, rear projection, 
prop de|)artnient. speech and acting coaching, 
slidefilm studio, film processing laboratories, art 
department, location equipment, creative staff. 
Projection sales and service. Special devices: 
.*>uitcase |)rojectors. ."^bopj^'r Stoppers, continu- 
ous loop projection, assessing projectors, syn- 
thetic training devices. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Motion Pk.tikes: W e Drivers (General Mo- 
tors!: Ttvo Guys Named Joe ( Frigidaire) ; 
Waves of Green (Dearborn Motors): Children 
around the World (Pontifical .Association) : The 
Shortest Way ( Doelilcr-Jar\ is ) : The World at 
Your Call ( .American Telephone and Tc-lc-graph 
CompanN I. Si.IDKKII.ms: A Date with Polly and 
Combating Corrosion with the Metal from the 
Sea (both for Dow Chemical Company): Your 
Assistant Salesman (Chevrolet Motors) ; A'o Two 
Alike ( Division of Christian Education, Na- 
tional Council of Churches of Christ). 

(See mention in film awards section) 



46 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



3li4'liiffan 



.>IKIIIOI*OIJTA.\ illlt AOO AltEA 



Klinc Studios. Im .. [')2i: (Juanlian Building, 
nt-lroil. Mich. Stiinl.'v Jack. 

* * * 

Rocket Pictures, Inc., 5809 Harvard Road. 
Detroit. Midi. Ph. mi-: Tl xedo 2-7762. 
George .Netschke. 
((ioiiiplele listing iiruh-r Los .Aiipeles area* 

27.) I I',. JelTci~oii \\)'ii(ie 

Detroit 7. Miilii;:ari 

Date of Organization: 1929 

Rra.NCMKS: Hd.ss Ro\. hie., of California. Holly- 

miod, (lal. Koss l{o\ -Fogarty. Inc.. .'?()7 No. 

.Michigan .Xveniie. Chicago. Illinois. 

OFKICKKS AND UEI'.ARTMtNT HEADS 

Ross Roy, President 

T. G. MeCorniiek. f!\ecitlire I ice Presiilpiil 

E. II. Haas.«. Secly. L. P. Morse. Treas. 

C. F. Sullivan, T. /'. in Charpe of Contact 

J. W . Mutton. / . I', ami Dir. Art, Prod.. Photo. 

K. C. Lovgren. / . P. and Copy Chief 
C. F. LeBolt. r. /'. and Dodpe Truck Acct. Exec. 

J. V. Bernartl. Dir. Photoiiraphic Studio 
I. A. Roche. Rec. Dir. K. W. Foster. Pur. Apent 

"•KKVKJE.s; Production and distrihution of serv- 
ice and sales training sound slidelilni programs; 
more than 2tK).()0U sets of fdnis and records a 
Near to the entire Chrysler Corporation alone. 
Also, for general husincss and educational use. 
|>ri>ducing and distrihuting Land of ihr Free 
program of sound slidefilms in color. 

Facilities: Photographic studio and dejiart- 
ment. art. animation, recording director and 
-lalT. and creative cop> personnel. 

RECENT I'RODl (:TI0N.S AND SI'O.NSOR.S 
/ /((■ Smiths Look Back (Ross Roy, Inc. I; All 
in a Dili's Work ( Chrvsler Corporation. Ply- 
mouth Division I: Your Profit Opiiorlunity with 
\tliis (Alias .'^u|)pl\ Company I : The Excilinp 
\rw Dodjie (Dodge Division I: Be Competitive 
The Texas Company I ; The Wise Way to Sell 
I rucks ( Dodge Truck Division I : Sellinn the 
\<-if Yorker (Chrysler Sales Division!: OTP 
Outlets That Pay I National Biscuit ( jimpan\ I : 
lienefits Point Out the tt inner ( DcSoto Divi- 
-ioni ; sound slidcfilm program for RCA Service 
< 'inipany and others. 

I.Si'p mention in film awards sec-lion t 

« « ♦ 

\\ ildiiig Firtlirr I'mdiicliixi-. Inc. 
\\ ((.IKM. Plcri KK Pltitdl I iiiiNs. Inc.. |(MHI Dime 
Building. l>ctn>it. Michigan. Phone: WOod- 
ward .■i-9,'ni. Ralph Cattell. vice president. 

iStuiiio and '■alc'. ulliii- fai ilitic. inninlain<-<l I . 

« « * 

B WW SKI. (f. W oi.ki- Sri nios, Wl'.\ Fisher Build- 
ing. Detroit 2. Mi.h. Phone: TRinity .H-.'1747. 
Richard Bonds. 
( Coinplrlr lilting under !.<)« Angelex area I 

(.vrnvi. llIM M HVK.t 

221 \l>l>otl Boad 

Kant Lansing, Michigan 



* * * 

AtI.AS FiIM (inlll'OKATION 

I II I South Boulevard 

Oak Park. Illinois 

I'hone: Al .■.tin 7-8(.2(t. Kl .lid ()-;UO(J 

Dale of Orguni/ulioii: I9I.H 

Branch iSuhvi : 22K No. I.aSalle Si.. Chicago 

OKI |(,ER.>> AM) OEI'ARI.MEM HEAUS 

L. P. Mominee, Vice Pres., Secly., Gen. Mpr. 

Albert S. Bradish. lice President, Production 

Frederick K. Barher. I .P., Dir. of Adv. and 

Sales Prom. 

Edward Schager. /./'.. Dir. of Sales 

Norman C. Lindquist. / ./'.. Dir. of TV 

Skkvicks: I6nini and .'{.Smni puhlic relations and 
training ni.>ti.in pictures and slidefilms: col.ir 
and sound: tele\isi.in commercials, short suli- 
jects. 

Facilities: Cameras, 16inm and 35mm R.C.A. 
sound recording: art departnient: tinic-la|>se 
photograph): twci sound stages; laboratory; 
animation: editing: creative staff. 

RECENT I'RODl CTIONS AND SI'ONSORS 
Miracle of the Ruinhoic I Hotp.>inl. Inc.) ; Amer- 
ica Bowls (National Bowling Council I; ICs 
Later Than You Think ( K. I. duPont de Ne- 
mours I : Appointments for Profit (duPonll : To 
Your Good Health I Bowman Dairv Companv I : 
You Be the Judiie (J. I. Case Company I : slide- 
films as follows: People .tre Our Business ( Per- 
fex Corporation I : Blend-.-lir ( The Coleman 
Company I ; Nowhere Else in the World ( Inland 
Steel Company I: Manure Is Like .Money (J. I. 
Case C.inipaii) l : .-Ill-American Game of the 
Week, series of 15, television show. 

I Sec mention in film award* •'••cli..iii 

« « ♦ 

Behi.kt Amikumin Mvhi.in. Inc. 

.>19 \\ . Haiid.dph Street 

Chicago <i. Illinoi- 

Phone: AN.loxer 3-1(127 

Dale of Organization: 1929 

OFFICERS AND DEI'VRTMENT IIFVDS 

Stanli-> B. \n.li'rson. President 

J..scph P. Mariin. I ./'. C. Kveretl Swar.l. / ./'. 

III. Unas I,. Fent.in. \ ./'. 

James Bannister, I ./'., Prod. 

Servh.es: Production of training slidefilms and 
accompanying materials: dealer and sales. |H-r- 
"oniiel. jid> training: public, industrial and |M-r- 
sonnel relations: product information: mnrket 
unaKsis. 

Facilities: Studio ec|uip|>rd to handle six to 
eight complete room sets at one lime; staff of 
6.5: photo InboratofN tc^chnicians. engineering 
drafUmen. cartoonists, artists, directors, retouch- 
ers, cle. tricians. car|M-nters: sound re<-iirdiiig on 
contract with national organization. 

RECENT I'RODl CTIONS AND SPON.MIRs 
Tratlinp for Profit i Molur Irmk Division of 
internatiiiiinl Harvester (!onipniiv i : llou and 
Where In Sell the tarmall Cuh i2 parts i and 
Selling the "C" ( 2 parts l ( pr.Hhicol as package 
for International Harvester i; The TD-I tA, .4 
Star Performer and The \eu TD-IH.i | Interna- 
tional Harvester t ; Heller Paris De\>arlments 



Part I. 77ie ABC's of Parts Inventory Control; 
Part II. 7/ie Physical .-fs/x-c/j of a Parts Depart- 
meni; Part HI, 77ie .ABC's of Parts Merchandis- 
infi, with instructor's manuals (Deere iL Com- 
pany I . 

HciW M VN I IIMs. |n< . 

( Afliliated with I'rainin;:. Inc. i 

36<) No. Miclii(;an Avenue 

Cllieago I. Illinoix 
Phone: DKarl.orn 2-<i292 

offh:ers and dei'vktment meads 

Gordon .''. i.ind. President 

Wesley K. liowman. I'.P.. Treas, 

Clarence F. Dorbv. Slidefilm Prott. 

Services: V'isuul material for business and in- 
duslrv and television: transparencies, glam 
slidc-s; slidefilms. sound and color: motion pic- 
tures, color. 

Facilities: Sound and color for motion pictures 
and slidefilms. 

recent PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 

7"/ie Eternal Trianple and Your Personal Pipe- 
line i Pure Oil Companv I ; Pulling RPM to 
Work (Stewart-Warner Corporation); Every- 
bofly's Reaching (Kraft Foods Company); Ra- 
diant Ray Healing ( Institute of Boiler and Radi- 
ator Manufacturers). 



Chicaco Film Stldhi* 
OF (!hicago Film I.arorathk^. In*:. 

56 K. Siipc-rior ."^Ircd 

Cliica;:o I I. Illiiioi* 

Phone: W Hilcliall l-6<>7l 

Date of Organization: 1928 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

.\. (i. Dunlap. Presiilenl 

R. D. Ca>tc-rlinc-. .We.t Hal .Svor, Script 

(jeorge Jarrelt. in Charge of Production 

Mike Dale. M. P. Aimer Brostrom, .*iUde, 

Maurice Manzoeillo. .4rl and .inimalion 

Howard Sienion. Camera 

Howard .Nhuvler. Sound 

Dick Carver. Editing Harold l.ignell. ImI). 

Services: From initial planning to release 
prints: I6nim and .'{.5miii motion picture's on ad- 
vcrli>ing. >ales promotion and sales .'ind job 
training, educational and travel; slidefilms, col- 
or; television commercials. 

FACiLlTlE.<i: Studios: art and animation; optical 
etfcils: RCA .35nim sound recording on film or 
.i.Snim magnetic ta|ie: pfojct ti.in lIuMtr.-: lab- 
• iralory : creative siafT. 

RECENT PRODI tmONs AND -IMN-MtRs 
Tomorrow's Leaders li-H Club'i ami Alaska 
Holiday ibolh for Allis-Chahiier^ Irni lor Divi- 
sion, co-prcwlucer I : 7/ie I mpire in Baseltall and 
W orld Series of I'K'U) I American and National 
l,eagues of Professional Baseball Clulist ; liol- 
lling Without Bottlenecks and Handling Rolls 
Wilh the Barlel Device (both for (ilark F.>|uip- 
inent Companv. Industrial Truck Division); 
Make the Most of Mittlrrnfold .Newcastle Prcnl- 
urL», Inc.); Sold! and Seighlnirs of the Ijond 
I both for The Oliver Corporation I ; TV films. 
( See mention in film awards section ) 



NUMBER 2 • \ O I. L .\1 E 12 • 1 9 S 1 



47 



I'IIIIA4;0 AIIFA 



jKRin Faikhanks I'kouk iions, 'H'> N. Michi- 
gan Avcnuo. Ciliiiagii. III. I'limif: MOIiiiwk 
4-5450. B. N. DnrliMfi. 

I II WCISCO I'll.MS^ 

222 iSii. Mirliif:uii Ax-mic 

Clii<u;:u I. III. 

Phone: STato 2-0798 

Half of Or;:aniy:iili(iii: l')42 

0KKU;KK.-^ AM) DKl'MMMKNT UKADS 

L. MiTccr Francisco, Owner 

Sekvh.KS: Producer of sound motion pictures, 

sound slidefilnis. filnistrips. 

F\(;ii.lTlKs: coinpli'tc photo<:raphic facilities for 
slidelilin production and auxiliary materials in 
own Chicapo studio, centrally located. F^xperi- 
enced in color reproduction as well as Mack & 
white. 

RKCENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
ll'.t Good Business I Illinois State Chamber of 
(ioinmercel also recent slidehlins for ("onipton's 
I'iclured Kmini iopaedia: I'lmltry & Egg Na- 
tional iioard: Naliimal I.i\csli>ik & Meat Hoard, 
etc. 

■*.■¥■•¥■ 

TiiK Jam 1Iam)\ Dkgamzation, Inc., 230 N. 
Michigan Avenue. Chicago 1, Illinois. Phone: 
STate 2-6757. Tom R. Curtis, in charge. 
Extensive creative and projection services 
maintained for the convenience of clients in 
the Chicago metropolitan area. (See Detroit 
listing for complete data on J HO services and 
facilities!. 

Henm.nc and CiiKADLF.. l\c.. 1140 So. Michigan 
Avenue. Phone WAbash 2-0570. Al E. John- 
son, branch manager. Complete photographic 
service for production: writer; distribution. 

■H ■»< -K 

Dallas Jones Productions 

172.1 No. Wells Street 

Chicago 14. Illinois 

Phone: MOhawk 4-5525 

Date of (^)rgani/,ation: 1947 

Dallas Jones, I'artner .Marilou Jones, Partner 

W. O. Zielke, Production Manager 

Services: Color and black-and-white motion 
pictures and slidefilnis for training, public rela- 
tions, advertising and sales; complete package 
service. 

Facilities: Equipment and personnel for sound 
slidefilni production, including laboratory, ani- 
mation and duplicating: three sets of lights for 
~lidefilm work, one set for motion pictures; new 
>ound recording stuilio: magnetic tajte; I8-piece 
^Iroboscopic as.s«-nd>ly for high-speed photog- 
raphy; three camera crews; stylist, artist, four 
writers. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
NaRCU-S Belter Stores Program (14 sound and 
color .slidefilnis. National Association of Retail 
Grocers!; Befiinninp Sports Series (\6 sound 
and color slidefilms. The Athletic Institute) ; 
Profits in the Balance (The Texas Company) ; 
Beauty Is Your Business (Sears, Roebuck and 
Company I: Mutiny on the Alley (American 
Bowling Congress) ; The Case of the lido Grill 



Ihilliis Joni-s Productions: Continued 

I American Linen SuppI) Compuiiy); ) ciu Can 
Make Music (American Music Conference). 

(See riiciilioii in film :i\\ar(l> -cilion) 

Klinc Studios. Inc. 

601 No. Fairbanks Court 

Chicago I I. Illiiioi.'- 

Phone: DEIaware 7-0400 

Date of Organi/atioii: 1935 

lu'pic«ciilati\es : New ^ork: ."> I K. .51st Street, 
New ^ (irk City. I'lione: El, dorado .")-7336. 
Harry Stevens. Detroit: I92K (iiianiiaii Build- 
ing, Detroit. Mich. StaiilcN Jack. 

OKFICKHS AND l»KI' \HTMi:NT UKADS 

Robert Eirinl)crg. I'rfsiilcnt 

I.ee Bivins, Secty.-Treas. 

Jack Leib. Dir. M.P. Div. 

Fred Niles, Dir. TV Div. 

David Savitt. Cam. Div. Chief 

Thorlund Tlmren. Scenario Div. 

Charles Koch, Animation Div. 

Services: 16nim and 35nim motion pictures, in- 
dustrial training, public and civic relations, edu- 
cational, technical. L .S. Armed Forces training; 
slidefilins: television; animation. 

Facilities: Studio, sound stage, RCA sound, 
color printing. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Lincoln in Illinois (State of Illinois) ; Employ- 
ment Insurance and You (State of New Jersey) ; 
Small Town Library (U.S. Army) ; Refrigera- 
tion Unlimited (Admiral Corporation) ; The 
Heart (G. D. Searle Company). 

Mervin W. La Rue, Inc. 

159 E. Chicago Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 

Phone: SUperior 7-8657 

Specializes exclusively in medical and scientific 

films for professional use. 

Midwest Film Studios 

6808 No. Clark Street 

Chicago 26. Illinois 

Phone: SHeldrake 3-1239 

Alfred K. Lew. Production Manager 

•»t ♦ -X 

Mercury International Pictures, 230 E. Ohio 
Street, Chicago 11. HI. Phone DElaware 
7-3934. Walter B. Wentzcl. 
(see complete listing in Los Angeles area) 

♦ ♦ ■» 

i'\itvGON Pictures, Inc. 

2540 Eastwood Avenue 

Evanston. Illinois 

Phone: DAvis 8-5900 

Date of Organi/.atioii: 1948 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Robert Laughlin. President 

Walter V. llardv. .'^eclY.-Treas. 

James E. Ford. Sides Mgr. 

Homer J. Dietmeier. Production Manager 

Services: Motion pictures, slidefilms and tele- 
vision commercials in sound, color, black and 
white: client planning service; sales and con- 
tact department. 



Paragon Pictures: Continued 

Fa(.II.IT1Ks: Sound on lihii recording; compli:ti' 
photograph\ : editing: animation artists; script 
u ritcrs. 

KEIENT productions AND SPONSORS 

Mr. .Shorthorn, U.S.A. (American Shorthorn 
Breeders' As,sociation) : Sapphire Lake (John- 
ion Motors I Outboard I; Temples of Mercy 
(Shriners' Hospitals for Crippled Children) ; 
Slidefilms for Zurich-American Insurance Com- 
panies: .Slioiking Conditions, Don't lie Liqui- 
dated, Mr. Casey Goes to Town, Trouble in 
Store, Pattern for Tragedy, and Easy Does It. 

(.See iiieiiliiin in film awards sectiiin) 

Pilot Productions 

6419 No. California Avenue 

Chicago 15. Illinois 

Phone: AMbassador 2-^tlH 

Paul T. I)o»ty and C. R. Isely, Partners 

Reid H. Ray Film Imilstries, Inc., 208 S. 
LaSalle St. Phone: Financial 6-0897. Frank 
Balkin. 

(Complete listing in St. Paul area) 

¥ * * 

Rocket Pictures, Inc., 1313 W. Congress 
Street. Chicago 1.3, III. Phone: SEeley 8-1511. 
J. Harry Ebbert. 

(sec complete listing in Ln> Anjielcs area I 

Sarra, Inc. 

16 E. Ontario Street 

Chicago 11, Illinois 

Phone: WHitehall 4-5151 

Date of Organization: 1937 

Branch Office: 200 E. 56th Street 

New York 22. N. Y. 

Phone: Ml rray Hill 8-0085 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

(At New York City Studios) 

Valentino Sarra. President 

Morris Behrend. General Manager 

Robert Jenness. Director: Rex Cox, Director 

John Henderson III. Producer-Director 

Slanlcv Johnson, Director 

George Altman, Editor 

David Fletcher, Art Director 

( At Chicago Studios) 

Harry W. Lange. Production Manager 

Joseph G. Betzer. Director of Film Planning 

Helen Krupka. Scenario Sup. 

Michael Stchney. Director 

Karl Oeser. Director 

George Di'Decker. Art Director 

Marvin Baiiev. Editor 

Services: Creation and production of motion 
pictures, slidefilms and television commercials 
for .sales, sales training, product promotion and 
information, employe training and indoctri- 
nation, safely training and promotion, public 
infornuitioii. ArnH'il Forces training subjects. 

Facii.itiks: 10mm and 35iiim motion picture 
cameras: still photographic equipment and per- 
sonnel: lOinni and .S.Siiim editing: art and ani- 
mation; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODIXTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Big As All Outdoors (General Outdoor Adver- 
tising Company I : For Your Land's Sake and 
Clear Path to Profit (both for Simplicity Manu- 



48 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Surra. Inc.: Cimliiiiti'd 

facturing (]oin|>aM\ I : One Uiince of Salel\ ( In- 
lernatiiitial Slim- Company); <i<)und sliili-filins 
as fdllous: U hill's Your Saji-ly LQ.?, Fnifiht 
Hanillinii. Cduse fur Alarm and Speech Series 
(all for National Safcr\- Council); Clock Up 
Extra Sales (Tclccliron Company); Your Out- 
door \eijihl)or I Outdoor Advertising Associ- 
ates) ; W Oman's Day ( A & I'l : Sealy Orthopedic 
Story (Sealy Mattress Company); Treasure 
Island I Pure Oil Co(npai\y I : Key to Better Liv- 
ing I Household Finance Corporation). 

(See mention in film awards section) 

Viking Picti kes Coki'okation 
1728 Sherman \venue 

Kvall^ton. Illinois 

IMione: DAvis 8-1623 

Chica-io Office: 111."; Howard Street 

FMioii.-: VMha^-sador 2-6513 

Date of Or<:anization: 1947 

OKKICERS AM) DKI'ARTMENT HKADS 

Sullivan C. Richardson, /'resident 

Arnold Whitaker, I .1*. 

Scott Whitaker. V.I'. West Coast Prod. 

Earl B. Brink. Board Member 

John K. Edmunds, Secty.-Treas. 

Services: Industrial, docunientarv. travel, edu- 
cational, animation, medical films. 

Facilities: Story development and script writ- 
ing staff: storylioard: animation: color; repre- 
sentative's olhce on Hal Roach lot iti Hollywood. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Power If agon { Dodge Trucks I ; Dodge Truck- 
Assembly Lines (for use in coo|>eration with 
theatrical showings of MGM's '"King Solomon's 
Mines") ; Sorthuard to Some (Dodge Motors) ; 
Valley oj Triumph (State of Utah) and Dodge 
ver>iiin; Laud oj the ('riiiisim Cliffs I I l;di I . 

« * * 

\o<;i k-\\kh;iit Sn dios 

(Division of Klectro^raplii<' Corporation) 

237 K. Ontario Street 

Chicago I I. illinoi- 

l'luu»>: WHitehall »-(l2H. DKIaware 7-83.50 

Date of Or-iani/alion: l')3l 

OKKICKKS AM) DKl'Mf tMKNT IIKVOS 

Alln-rt W. Dungan. President of Electrographic 

Corporation and Manager of 

I ogue-lf right Studios 

George T. Be<-ker. Mgr. Visual and Trng. Depl., 

I'ogue-K' right 

Services: Motion pictures, motion-slide, slide- 
films, televi-iion commercials and shorts, cliart.s, 
manuals. Iiooklets; tilm> on indu>lrial >alr> and 
|MTsotiMrl training, safety, puhlic and civic rcla- 
tion>. 

Facilities: Motion picture and slidefilni equip- 
ment: sound studios: editing, animation; 2U0 
arli>t.«; creutivi- staff. 

RECENT PRODI r.TIONS AND SPON.SORS 

\ oting does Modern ( Hoar<l of Eleition Com- 
missioners of Citv of ('hicagol ; (.autiim at the 
Crossroads ( molion-slidefihii for Nationnl .Asso- 
ciation of Automotive Mutual Insurance Com- 
panies!; the following slidefilms; four f.fjeclive 
Selling films ( Inlernational Harvt-ster Com- 
pan\ ) ; It's Up to You ( ."^tudehakcr Corptira- 



V'ugup-lT'righl Studios: Continuvd 
tiont; Systrm for Selling ( .Studeliaker i : On 
I line (Goodyear Tire and Rubl>er Company). 

(See mention in film awards section j 



WiLDi.Nc Picture Prodlctio.ns, I.nc. 

13ir> \r^v le Street 
(iliica;:o Id. Illinois 
I'hone: I.On^lieacli l-»tlO 
Date of Or^ani/alioii: l<>l I 
Incorporation: l')27 
BlUMMKs: New York: .385 .Madison Avenue. 
.New York, N.Y. I'hone: Pl^za 8-1727. J. W. 
Inglefield, vice president. Detroit: KMK) Dime 
Building. Detroit. Miih. I'hone: WOodward 
2-'«ll. Ralph Cattell. vice president. Cleve- 
land: 310 l^wi-tland Kuildiii;:. (ileveland, Ohio. 
I'hone: TOwer l-(^l-M). Jack Rlii-instrom. vice 
president. Cincinnati: En(|uirer Building. Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. I'hone: CArfield 0477. James 
LaMarr, l>ran<-h manager. Si. Louis: 4^)5.3 Lin- 
dell Boulevard. St. Louis. Mo. Phoni': LI cas 
0986. James Darst. in charge. Hollvwood: 5'>i;l 
Venice Boulevard. Hollywood. California. Phone: 
WEbster 0183. John Oser. Iiramh manager. 
OFFICERS AND DEPART.MKNT HEADS 
C. H. Bradfield. Jr.. President 
H. W. Fish. Exec. I .P. V. A. Burg. Secty.Tretu. 

J. A. Kellock. / ire President, Production 
(jeorge Schuvler, I ice President, Chicago Sales 
Walter Tinkham, Jerome Diebold. Exec. Assts. 

Harold Kinzle. Laboratory Superintendent 

(iilhert Lee. Art Dir. A. J. Bradford, f.'u.s/. Serv. 

C. H. Cas<Milieiser, Merchandise anil Equipment 

Paul McOsker, Purchasing 

R. E. Husted. Jr.. Adr. and Sales Promotion 

Duncan Taylor, Slide/ilm Department 

Services: Producers of sound motion pictures 

and souiiil sliileliliiis for commercial applica- 
tion and liliMs for television. 

Facilities: 60,000 sq. ft. of floor space in main 

studio, {'hieago; 27.(K)0 ft. given over to three 
stages. 2(HI X 7.5. 100x70 and 100 X .50 ft.; re- 
mainder to administrative and creative offices, 
still and motion laboratories; optical and ani- 
mation departments, art studio, screening rooms, 
sound department, film vaults, carpenter shop 
and other departments. Stage facilities, xreen- 
ing rooms and administrative oihci-s aUo avail- 
able at coinpan\'< Detroit and HoUvwood stutlios. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 

'( Closed Book ( Farm Bureau Insurance Com- 
panies): Big Kitchen (II. J. Hein< ('oinpanv) : 
(Credit. Man's Confidence in Man (Dun & Brad- 
strii-t. Inc. I; Strictly Business (New ^ ork Life 
Insurance Company); The Case of Tommy 
Tucker iPhniouth Division. Chrvsler Corp«ira- 
lion); The House That Faith Built ( Anheuscr- 
Busah. Inc.); Last Date ( Lunilx-rnienV Mutual 
Casualtv Companx ( : I hr Editor's .\olebook 
(Chicago DaiK Ne».i : U nrkhorse of the Farm 
( \\ illvs-OverlamI Motors. Ini'.l. 

(See mention in film award* •n-lion^ 



Baimuel G. Wolei- Stvdios. frU N. Michigan 
\venue. Chicago. III. Phone: MOhawk 4-1780. 
John W. (^arnrirk. 

(See roniplclr listing in L«» Angeles nrc.i 



WKsi ri<:.\iii.\L 



llliiioiN 

« « * 

The \ e.nahi) (Iik.wizvtion 

702 So. Vilam- Street 

Peoria 2. lllinoi> 

Phones: 4-2l<XI an<l 8261 

Date of Organization: 1923 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

C. L. Venard 

Fran<es B. Venard 

Sehvk Es: Production and distribution of indus- 
trial and agricultural films. 
FACILITIES: Studio ei|uipmenl and creative staff. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
7 he Shailou of a Pioneer ( Kev->tone Sti-el & \^ ire 
('onipanv ( ; Willing Acres (Ke\«tone Steel ^ 
Wire Company I ; For the Common Good (Sears- 
Rfx-buck Foundation and The National Grange). 

(See mention in film awards section I 



luwa 

Genkkm I'nTi kks I'ltoni «;tiuns. Inc. 

621 Sixth Vveniie 

Dei- Moine- •). Iowa 

Phone: 3-1553 

Date of Organization: 1945 

I.alioratorv : Keinpton Koad 

l)e- Moines. Iowa. Phone: 3-8275 

OFFICERS AM) DEPARTMENT IIFXDS 

\X'. k. Niemann. President 

Ted Sloane. I ice President 

D. H. Bonine, lire President. Laboratory Chief 

W. H. Schultz, Vice President. Prinluction Chief 

Services: Industrial sales and job training and 
civic relations films; television subjects. 

F.\ciLITll'-S: Sound and color camera and lalnira- 
tory equipment; sound recording and re-record- 
ing, direct-on-fihn, magnetic film. ta|M-; color 
printing; animation; etliting; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND >IH)N>«»RS 
Hy-Line Farm Parade ( Piomvr Hi-Bre<l C^irn 
Company I ; Your Business Begins in the Cus- 
tomer's Basement (Coal Healing S«-ryic-r Divi- 
sion. National Coal .VsiMxialion) ; ) ou and ) our 
Coo\>eralites ( Farmers Grain Dealers \ssocia- 
tion of lowal; Address \ot Knoun (Christian 
Rural Overseas Program) ; Drake Relays of 19^ 
(Ford De.ilero "f ln«.i, .itid Dr.ike I nivrrsitv). 

Tele-Visial Prodictions 

'>I3 \\ .ilniK Street 

!>«•■> Moiiie- '), low a 

Phone: 3-7368 

Dale of Orpiifii/atioii : 1<)|3 

ollliKH.s VMl DKPARTMEM ll».VD> 

Burton B. Jerrel, Ouner and Producer 

Briii-e H. Powell, Slafj Cameraman 

Te<l Husing, Bert U il«<in. Don O'Brien. Sarralors 

'^EHVicr.s: 16min and .HSmni films for indu-olry 
and lhealrr!>; 15 produrlions in 19.50 for na- 
tional sp«ins4>ni. 

V\i II.ITI»: (^iiiera and sludio r<]uipmcnl ex- 
• epl animation: creative staff; laltoratorv in New 
^ork. I Production list not supplied.! 



N 1 M II y K 



\ ( 1 1 I M I I : 



1931 



49 



WKST r^MIIAL 



.>linii«'N(>ia 

American In m a Televad (Iomtan^ 

759 Vi . Srvfiuli Slroct 

St. I'liiil 2. Miiiiii-sota 

I'liono: Dale 1620 

Dulp iif Orfiiiiiiziition: l'J4.'i 



Kill) 11. l{\\ I ll.M l.NUl STKlK.s 

226«) For.l Parkway 

St. I'aul I. Minni'sola 

Phone: K.Meisoii LWi 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Kt'id II. Ray. President 

W illiaiii H. Hingold. \ .P. C. H. N>.|uisl. Treas. 

.■Mice M. Griswold. Secretary 

Skrvices: 16niin and .S5mm motion pictures and 
slidt'filnis: rolnr: tlicatrc siTt-en advertising pro- 
duction and dislriixition: television commer- 
cials created and produced. 

Fv< ll.lTiKs: .^tudio. sound recording, creative 
-talT. Distribution. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Soyheans — 7"^^ Feature Story (The National 
Soybean Crop Improvement Council) : Frozen 
Treasure (International Harvester Company); 
Colli If eallier Seahees ( L .S. iSav) . Bureau of 
^ards and Docks I: Enpine Conilitioninii and 
Pnner Plant Ojieration ( l.S. Air Force): Stra- 
teiiic Air Power ( I'.S. Air Force): On the 
lioanlualk ( The Convention Bureau of Atlantic 
(!it\ I : //I'v Fnlhrr's Choire I Deere & Coinpanvl. 



IUphaki. G. Wolkk .^tldios. 4030 Quentin 
Avenue. Minneapolis 16. Minn. Phone: 
WAInut .-iaWJ. Ernest Clifford. 

( see complete listing under Los Angeles ) 



.>lis.s«>uri 

The Calvin Company 

1 10.1 Triinian hioad 

Kansas City 6, Missouri 

Date of Orfianizalion: 1931 

OFFICERS AM) DKPAKTMKNT HEADS 

F. O. Calvin. President 

Llovd I liompson. I ./'. Larrv Sherwood. ( ./'. 

.\eal Kechn. I)ir. Services 

Frank Barhydt. Dir. Prod. 

B. C. Calvin. Sectv. -Treas. 

I^onard Keck, Oper. Mpr. 

Dick Bulkeley. Prod. Hfpr. 

Ken .Moran. Pus. Mfcr. 
Maxine Covell, Office M/tr. 

Services: 16nim color sales and .sales training 
films: service work for other producers and for 
universities. 

Fac:ii.ities: 8.(K)0 sq. ft. studio spa<e; location 
pijuipment for three crews: laboratorv with out- 
put of 25.()(K(.(K)0 ft. black and white, 20,000.- 
• KXJ ft. color a year; color processing: 12 edit- 



ing rooms; two sound studios with six channels, 
four phono, recording ei|ui|>incnt for film. ta|M\ 
unx. magnetic film: si\ fiill-linie directors: 
ireative staff. 

RECENT PRODI ( IIONS AM) .^PO.\.M)RS 
fFe the Customer (Goodyear Tire and Rubber 
Compaiiv I : The Finishing Touch ( E. I. duPont 
de Nemours & Company ( : 7'/ie (Chosen Career 
(Glolie l!a(lcr\. Inc.): Poiver jar Protection 
( Cii(cr|>illiir Tractor Company): There's Work 
liriii^ Diinr I I iileriialinnal Harvester Company I . 

* « « 

Wilding Picture Pkoductions, Inc., 405.3 Lin- 
dell Boulevard. .'^1. Louis. Missouri. Phone: 
Llcas O'Jiif). James Darsl. in charge, 
(see complete listing under Chicago. 111.) 

Wi.*i«-<>ii.siii 

The Cooley Company 

1327 .\o. Market Street 

Milwaukee 2, Wisconsin 

Elliot W. Cooley, President 

Beatrice Cooley, Vice President 

Film Arts Cokpokmion 

725 W.Wells Street 

Milwaukee 3. Wisconsin 

A. K. Hadley. President 

M. H. Abrani 11. I ice President 



Vernon J. Kraft Film Productions 

840 ?V. Plankinton Avenue 

Milwaukee 3, Wisconsin 

Phone: Marquette 8-6472 

Date of Organization: 1937 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Vernon J. Kraft. Partner 

Frances M. Kraft. Partner 

Services: Industrial, sales and joh training and 
sports enlertainnieiil rrmlidii pirlures and slide- 
films. 

Facilities: Maurer and Bell & Howell cameras: 
lights, stage block and cables for interiors and 
exteriors: anitnalion department: script writing. 
RECENT MOTION PICTl RES AND SLIDEFILMS 
Rex Pumpcrete to tlie Meat Packinji Industry; 
Norfolk & Western Railway l\eiv Elkhorn Tun- 
nel; Ten Killer Ferry Dam ; Tunnel [.ininp icith 
Rex Pumpcrete: .Shotsiiin .S/ioo^iVii anil Hoir: 
Retrievers at Work. 

SOI TIIWK^^r 



T«'xjis 

* ♦ « 

Gllf (ioA-ST FiLM>. Inc. 

309 Oil and Gas Building 

Houston 2. Texas 

Phone: Blaekstone 5471 

Branch: 9 W. 61st Street. New York 2.3, N. Y. 

Phone: Circle 6-0191. 

Date of Organization: \9'iO 

Robert Yarnall Hicliie, President 

Virginia G. Richie, Secretary-Treasurer 



Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms, black 
and white or color. 

F\ni.rriK>: Camera, lights, eipjipment for loca- 
tion work. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Make .\o Mistake (Geophvsical .Service. Inc.); 
Petndfum Pinnrerinfi ( .Superior Oil Company); 
Eleven to Three South Pacific (Alfred C. Glas- 
sell. Jr.). 

(See iiii'iiliori In film ;n\ards si-(ti<in I 

l!c>ni;i<r ^ arnai.i. Ruiiie Productions, Inc., 
.{((9 Oil and Gas Building. Houston 2. Texas. 
Phone: Blaekstone 5471. 

(sec complcli- llsllng unriir \iu ^'nrk Cil\ I 

* ♦ ♦ 

JAMiKsoN Film (Company 

382.') Hrvan Street 
Dalla>. I'exas 

Phone: TKnnison 81,58 

Date of Organization: 1916 

OFFICERS AM) DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Hugh \'. Janiieson. Manager 

Bruce Jaiiiieson. Manager, Sound and f.ahoratory 

Hugh V. Janiieson. Jr.. Production Manager 

Dean Babbitt. Writer-Director 

Robert Alcott, Camera Department 

Hope Lamed, Kodachrome color correction 

Services: Industrial, educational, training and 
sales promotion motion pictures, 16mni and 
35mm; short advertising subjects for theatres 
and television. 

Facilities: Studio and sound stage. RCA 16mni 
and 35mm sound, synchronized sound shooting. 
16min and 35mm: laboratory service; Koda- 
chrome printing with scene-to-scene color cor- 
rection: animation: creative staff. 

RECE.NT PRODICTIONS AND .-iPONSORS 
7V.VO.S and Its Natural Resources (Texas Gulf 
Sulphur Company); Signal X (Texas Police 
Chiefs .Association) ; The Last Few Years (Paris 
Junior College I: A Story of Copper (Phelps 
Dodge Cor|)oration I ; Death on the HiphuaYs 
I I'ulilii .'^afetv l'l(tures Coinpanvl. 

Texas Industrial Film Company 

919 M& M Building 
lloiislon 2. lexas 

Phone: Charter 9371 

Date of Organization: 1945 

N. Don Macon, Owner and Operator 

Services: Industrial training and sales promo- 
tion motion plc(ures. Umiiii sound. <-olor: .35mm 
sound slldelilnis. 

1- vcii.lTlES: 16imn camera and lighting equip- 
ment; disc, magnetic tape and 16mm optical 
sound recording: picture and sound editing: 
printing ecpiipment for 16mm motion pictures 
and 3.5nnn slidefilms. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 

Better liaking for a Better .imerica (National 
Biscuit ('ompan\ I : Doic in Texas (Dow Chem- 
ical Compaii) I : U orkinp Together ( Humble Oil 
\ Keliniiig Company I : Control oj Pink lioll- 
uorm and Other Cotton Insects (Anderson. 
Clapton Co., Inc. I: Modern Gas Heatinji, Mod- 
ern Gas Cooking, Modern Gas Water Heating — • 
three slidefilms in sound and color ( Iniled Gas 
('ompan\ ) . 



30 



BUSINESS SCREEN M \ C \ / I N E 



>IIM .XTAI> STATKS 



C'ol«>ra<l«» 

* * * 

ThOS. J. liAKIlHK 

Motion Picti hi-, Pni>i)i (TIons 

I2IS K. \ ir^iiiia \\cmif 

Denver V. (^oluruilo 

Phono: K Arc 460.". an.l IWK. 
OKKK.KRS AM) DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Tlios. J. Riirhri-. Ownrr. MarutiitT. I'rodiicer 

lliTMiiin I rschcl. Rfronlinii Direrlor 

R. (i. Zcllcrs, Assistant Camera Chief 

SeRVU;F.S: 16Mnn produtlion from S(ri|)t ti> 
screen; e(il<>r: sound: |)ul)lir relations anti sales 
films. 

FAi:il.rnKs: Muurer Cameras and 100.000 watts 
lighting e(|ui|)nient: sound-on-fiirn rerording. 
16inm magnetie. disc: s<putid truck and genera- 
tor: editing; animation and titling e<|ui|>tneiit 
and staff: recorded music library and staff or- 
ganist: edil<irs: script writer. 

RECENT TKODl CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Indian I'aint i ('(dorado Fuel & Iron Corpora- 
lion I ; It's a Fact ( Quickuay Truck Shovel Com- 
pany); Green and Gold (Colorado A. & M. 
College): The Crofi That's Tops and The Beet 
Seed Story ( liotli for Great Western Sugar Com- 
pan\ I : Sli-el's l'arl\ Line. Realork Fence, 
Grader lilades and Chani^inp the Face of the 
Earth (all for Colorado Fuel & Iron Corpora- 
tion); Pay Dirt! (Gardner-Denver Company): 
Watchmen <r/ the Sijihl (Denver Burglar .Marm 
Companv I . 

Jkvn .M. V . I)i HOIS MoTio.N Pictures 
fTiiE Jean Di bois Company y 

221 I Dahlia Street 
Den\er 7, (Colorado 

I'll. me: East 8122 

Date of Organization: 1929 

Branch Office and l.ahoralory : 

927 - 21sl Street. Denver I. Colorado 

I'hone: .Main ."^401 

Jean M. V. Dubois. Ouner 

^KRVICKS: .')5mm and 16mni motion pictures for 
theatres and television: newsreel coverages, gen- 
eral interest and civic relations features and 
short subjects; promotion trailers. 

F\(:lt,lTIKS: .H.Smm e<|uipment for black and 
Hliite motion pictures. Ifimni for black and uliili- 
and (iilor productions. 

RECENT PRODI CTION.- AND .>Pl)N.»((R> 
Newsreels (for Movietone News, Universal News- 
reel. I'athe News. News of the Dav and NBC TV 
Ne»sri-e|i: llandi-C.nmfi (trailer for C'olorado 
Socielv for Cri|iplc<l (ihildrcni: Ihiiiny. Test 
(TV. for Truth and (;i>ns<-(picnces i : lilock I'nrly 
I Fox Inter-Mountain Tht-atresl; lliimanimals 
I Originated anil prodmed I'v I M F Dubois). 



I lit' .^l.indanls of riii« IniliiKlrv 
♦ Facilities, both phvsical and creative, as well 
as evperience in terms of recenllv-produced fdms 
and financial slabililv. are the guiding factors to 
be considered bv the business film buver who 
has need for these services. 



ArTIIIK (J, RiPPEY AM) CoMC VN^ 

.'>30 First .National Bank Building 

Denver 2. ( !olorado 

Phone: IM.or 0221 

Date of Organization: 191.3 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT IIEADs 

Arthur (.'•. Hippev. Mana/iinii Partner 

Clair (.',. Henderson. General Manager 

Gilbert N. Bucknum. Partner. Production Head 

liarrv A. I,azier, Partner 

Skrvicks: Industrial and civic relations motion 
pictures, color and sound, both voice-over and 
lip svnchroiii/ation: sound slidefilms. black and 
white and color: glass slides, blaik and while 
and cidor. 

FvciLiTIKS: Kiiiim i-amera ei|uipinent. portable 
recording aiul recortling supervision, editing, 
creative stall. 

RECENT PRODI <.TION> \ND .-^roNMHO 
The World-Herald Story (Omaha World-Her- 
ald l : •/ \etv World oj Color (Colorizer Associ- 
ates I : Idaho- Adventure in Enterprise (Idaho 
First National Bank I : 77ie Divine Flower (Colo- 
rado Stale Flower Growers Association) : Hope 
— A Record oj Mercy in Action ( Lutheran Sani- 
tarium > . 

S«)NOCIIH(>MK Pic IL RES 
227.'> (ileiicoe Street 
Denver 7, Colorado 

I'hone: Fast 3192 

Dale of Organization: 1942 

Brancli: Ml i.TiciiKOMK. Laboratories 

760 Gougli Street, San Francisco, California 

OEEK ERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

K. K. Hooper. (tuner-Producer 

George E. Perrin, Director of Photonraphy 

Herbert McKennev. Owner. MuUichrome 

l.ahoralories 

Services; Industrial and civic interest motion 
pictures, tourist promotion and safetv films. 

Facilities: Sound and cidor camera and mobile 
generator equipment, sound and tape recorders, 
animation, title and effects departments, color 
printing, art ami writing departments. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPON>ORS 
The California Aephsr (Burlington. Kio Grande 
and Wislirn Pacific Railroads I ; Go West to San 
Francisco ( Westi-rii Pacihc Railroad I: Califor- 
nia Holiday (Conlinental Bus Svsleiii): .Scrnrrv 
I nlimitrd (Denver i. Rio tiraiuli- W i-stern Rail- 
road ( : llouih Friend (Denver ik Rio (Grande 
Western Railroad); Miracle in U ooti (Douglas 
Fir PIvvvood As.«o<'iation I : History of tur in 
Colorado (Historical Society); 19,S1 Kelra-scs: 
Detour to Wonderland ( Di-nver & Rio (>randr 
Western Railroad i : A. A. \. Tour of Colorado 
(Olin Hotel I : Autumn Time around Siramhoat 
Sprin/is (Denver & Rio (>raiide Western Rail- 
road I : Rainhnus in Rocks I Driiver & Kio 
(>rande \X'eslern Railroad): \alural Resources 
of Colorado iDenvi-r ik Kio Grande Western 
Railroad* : Farm I ses of I'lyuooil (Douglas Fir 
PIvwooil AssiM iaiioii I . 

I See mention in film attards sertion) 



Mars appciriiig over .i pimluii-r li«ling indicole 
advertising copv ap(>raring elsewhere in this issue. 



WKST ro.\sr 



^'<»rlli<TM t iilifornia 

iMoTio.N I'll HUE Service Company 

125 Hyde Street 
San Francisco 2, (California 

Phone: OKilway H-9162 

Dale of Organization: I93.> 

OEEICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEM)'' 

Gerald L. Korski. President, General Uana/ier 

Jack (ioodwin, Manafier 

Harold A. Zell. Production Manaper 

Boris Skopin, Manai-er. Title and Trailer Dept. 

Mln-rt Niggenievcr. Manager, Lahoratory Dept. 

SkkmcEs: Industrial public relations films, in- 
cluding series for -Standard Oil Company of 
(iaiifornia, on county fairs, rodeos and other 
outstanding events in western states for release 
in theatres in California. Oregon and \X ashing- 
ton; al.so spe«-ial trailers for theatres throughout 
the country. 

Fac:iuties: 16mm and 35mm laboratories; title 
and animation equipment: art department: pre- 
view and culling rooms: re<-ording and re- 
recording; dark room, printing room, three film 
vaults: script-to-release print facilities, 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS 
>(/;i Francisco's Ageless (.aide Cars; Ims ( epos 
Helldorado; Portland Rose Festival; Humboldt 
County Fair; Pendleton Round-ip; Desert Gov- 
alcaile; Lodi Grape Festival (all »ponsore<l by 
Standard Oil Companv of California i : I9S0 San 
Francisco Conicniiiin ( \inrrii an Medical \ssn.l 

Vi', A. Palmer Films. In< . 

61 I Howard Street 

San Franci«co i, tialifomia 

Date of Organization: 1936 

OEEICERS \ND DEPVRTMENT HEADS 

W . A. Palmer. President 

H. B. Butler. VP-Treas. 

Y. F. Boolhe. Comptroller 

F'lorence H. Dievi-s, Pro<l. Mpr. 

Joseph P. Dievcs, Camera 

Serv|(:(-S: Industrial public relations and sales 
training films: sound slitlefilms: television. 

Fa(IIJTIks: .'studio and bH-ation: sound record- 
ing including niiii. magnetic film. ta|>e and diM-; 
multiple channel dubbing and Interlock: color 
printing. 16mm optical printer; Kine»4-ope; 
.(5mm Moviola and editing i-tjuipment: anima- 
tion artist: writers and etiilors. 

RECENT PRODI tTIONS AM) SKJNMIRS 
A Way of Life and Zea \la\s ((Ulifornin Pack- 
ing ('or|x>ralion ( ; llirth oj a Salesman (."^ & W 
Fine FikmIs); Mtnlern Controlled Irripalion 
I VI. K. Ames C'ompanv i : The Stor^ of Pasqual 
Celery ( D'Arrigio Hro». Co, of California i ; edit- 
ing, rrrording and printing of the following: 
Canadian Piixline i Bechlel International Cor- 
poration); .S'u;>rr Inch i IWhiel i : Sierra Fish 
and Game I Pacific (Ja« & Kle<lric Com|>«nv ) ; 
Exercise MIKI (s|Min«ore<l bv Slamlnrd Oil ('om- 
l^anv of California, joint Arniv-Navv o|>erali<in) ; 
/*.(.. Jt E, Super-Inch t Pacific Gas & F.le«tric): 
A Minute in the Life of Herkimer Hamstrung 
iTN' series for Rainier Brewing Ci>mpanv I . 



M M BER i • \ o I I M E 1 .' • I 95 I 



SI 



WKST rOAST 



.MirilllllMMJIAX MIS A>i;h:LKS 



>iorlli«>rn < alif«>rnia 

Photo a Sound Productions 

116 Niitoiiiii Sirt-ct 
San Friiiu-i!-<(i 5. Culifornia 

Ylkoii 2-3»>86 

Dull- of Or^iiiiii/atioii: l<)38 

111 as!-(>('iatioii w illi (iraphii- Films Corporation, 

1108 Lillian Way, Hollywood. California. 

Phone: GRanil.- 2191 

0FFU:ERS AM) DF.rARTMENT HKADS 

Donald M. Ilatfu-ld. I'n-siilenl 

William C. Eyniann. I ice President, 

General Manager 

Louis A. Huinason, Director of Sales 

Caryl Coleman. Director, Television and Radio 

Cliark-s A. I.arrance. Chief Editor 

Services: Industrial, sales and job training. 
[>ublic relations, educational, medical motion pic- 
tures: slidefilins, fjlmstrips: television program 
and commercial films. 

Facilities: Maurer <ameras and recording sys- 
tems: sound and silent stages: Moviola editing 
equipment: animation department: creative 
staff: contract script writing. 

RECENT PROUICTION.S AND SPONSORS 
How to Crow Beautiful Roses (California Spray- 
Chemical Corporation ) : Dairy Insect Control 
(California .*«pra) -Chemical ( : Labor and Child- 
birth (Medical Films, Inc. I : t'Jers on the March 
(Golden State Dairy Company) ; More I'ower 
to Rio I Morrison-Knudsen Company) . 

GE.Nt K. W ALKEK PkOUL CTIO.NS 

465 California Street 

San Francisco 4. California 

Phone: VI kon 6-2891 

Date of Organization: 1938 

Studio at 629 Commercial Street, San Francisco, 

California. Phone: YUkon 24181 

OFKICERS AM) DEI'ARTMENT HEADS 

Gene K. Walker. Sole Owner 

Edmund M. Driggs. Manager, Client Service 

J. Philip Buskirk. Production Control 

Alan Atkins. Art Director 

Russell MeNcr. Director of Photography 

Charles Schelling. Chief Sound Technician 

"SERVICES: Camera, lighting, titling, editing, ani- 
mation, sound, color service for industrial and 
documentary motion pictures; slidefilms and 
filmstrips; corollary visual aids. 

Faciuti)>: lunit Stancil- Hoffman IT'limm 
magnetic tape recording, plus interlock: 16mm 
film recording: lalioralory : Type A and 13 ani- 
mation e<|uipiMent and staff: creative staff with 
tw'o full-time writers. 

RECENT PRODI (:TI(iN> AND SPONSORS 
Chicago. i'.S./t. I I iiiim Slmk Yard and Transit 
(.°oinpan\ I : Thanks to the Atom I Standard Oil 
Company of California) : ffe Take It from 
Here (Standard Oil Company of California); 
The Follow Through (Standard Stations, Inc.); 
No Greater Satisfaction (Standard Stations, 
Inc.. I : East African Safari (Pacific Lumber 
Com I >a UN I. 



Apkx Film Corporation 

971 No. La t^ienc^a itoiili'\ aril 

I>«s .\ngele8 46, California 

Plioiie: CHi-slview r>-.'i.'>2 I 

Date of Organi/.ation: 1945 

Brand. Office: 38 E. 57th St., New York. N.> . 

OFEICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Jack Chertok. President 

Harrv Cohen. J ice President 

F^minett B. Miller, Secretary 

C. W. George. Treasurer 

Harry H. Poppe. Associate Producer 

Sammy Lee, Director 

William J. Thiele. Director 

Ches Cobb. Director of Animation 

Jack Kuggicro. Film Editor 

Robert Pittack. Head Cameraman 

Fddie Pelzoldt, Electrical Department Head 

Services: Industrial, educational, Governmental, 
civic relations and theatrical and television mo- 
tion pictures. 

Facilities: By annual contract: stage space, 
cameras, electrical equipment, sets, special effects, 
opticals. titles. Produced 78 half-hour television 
shows and 250 commercials in 1950. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
The DuPont Story (E. I. duPont de Nemours & 
Company I : A Story of duPonI Research (E. I. 
duPont de Nemours & Company I : Closeup of 
Nylon (E. I. duPont deNemours & Company) ; 
The Quarterback (National Association of Manu- 
facturers I : Joe Turner, American ( National 
Association of Manufacturers) : Assignment — 
General Mills (Genera! Mills. Inc. I : That Babies 
May Five (The Carnatimi (^oiiipaiu I : Miss Dun- 
ning Goes lo Town (The T<ini Company). 

(See mention in film awards section) 



Cascade Pictures of Califor.nia, Inc. 

8822 Washington Boulevard 

Culver City, California 

Phones: TExas 0-2761, VErmonl 8-2185 

Date of Organization: 1948 

OFFICERS AND DEPART.MENT HEADS 

Bernard J. Carr, President 

Roy W. Seawright, Vice President 

Services: Industrial, public relations films, ad- 
vertising and television subjects. 

Facilities: Complete production facilities. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
i fiur Kentucky ( Coinmonwcaith of Kentucky); 
Inlroduriion lo Rnilialion Delerlion Instruments 
( L ..S. Armed Forces I: Self-Prescrtalion in an 
Atomic Bomb Attack (I'.S. Armed Forces I ; The 
Effects of Atomic Bomb Explosions (U.S. Armed 
Forces); .Seabees — Can Do Plus (U.S. Navy); 
You Can (Change the World (The Christophers) ; 
General Provisions for Storage in the U.S,A.F, 
(I..S. Air Force). 



Cavai.cade Pictures, I.nc. 

919 Seward Street 

Hollywood 38, California 

Phone: HOIK wood 9-5458 

Date of Organization: 1945 

Brancli : 875 West End Avenue 

New ^ ork 25. \. Y. 

Phone: ACademy 2-1781 

officers and DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Harvey Pergament. President and Chairman 

Earl M. Robins, I' ice President 

Esther Pergament, Secretary-Treasurer 

Melvin Sloan, Associate Producer 

Jodie Coplan. Supervising Film Editor 

Alvin Pergament, Story Editor 

Services: Travelogues and novelties-commer- 
cial: importer of cartoons and musicals for 
sponsor release. 

Facilities: Production, editing and creative 
staffs. 



Pat Dowling Pictures 

1056 So. Robertson Boulevard 

Los Angeles 35, California 

Date of Organization: 1940 

Pat Dowling, Owner 

D. W. Johnson. Prod. T. J. Stanton. Slidefilms 

Ray Lockert. Cutting Department 

Services: Industrial job training, public and 
civic relations, educational and theatrical motion 
pictures and slidefilms. 

Facilities: Equipment for production of sound 
and color motion pictures and slidefilms for own 
account and other producers; art department and 
creative staff. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
A JSation's Meat (Swift & Company): Mill 
If heels Rolling ( Hawaiian Sugar Planters Asso- 
ciation) : lour Dollars at Work (Honolulu Com- 
niunilv (]hest ( : Hawaii — The Land of Sugar 
(own account. fi>r Hawaiian Island theatres) ; 
Th-e Hawaiian Islands — Their Origin and Nature 
Today (own account for U.S. schools) ; The 
Hawaiian Islands — The Chief Industries (own 
account for U.S. schools) ; Early West (own 
account for U.S. schools, slidefilm series) ; The 
Hawaiian Islands (own account for U.S. schools, 
slidefilm series): How Ifater Power .[lakes 
Electricity ( o»wi account for L .S. schools, slide- 
film I . 



l)l 1)1. i;^ l*l( 11 UK> (.Olil'llH \ll(IN 

AND I)l ni.KV TkIEVISKIN Uolll'OK vtion 

9<)()K Sania Moni< a Boiil<-var<l 

BcmtIx Hills. California 

Plioin-: CRcslvicw 1-7258 

Cable address: Dudleypic 

Dale of Organization: 1947 
Diidlev Television (Corporation: 1951 

Branrli (tflicc: ."id I Madison Vvenue 
New \<irk. N. \. Phone: KLdorado 5-1076 



52 



business screen -MAGAZINE 



OFFICERS ANI) DF.l'ARTMKNT HEADS 

Carl W. I)utll.-\. I'n-sident 

Dull McNaiiiara. \ iff I'rfsiilent 

Eugene II. ISarncs. Sffrfltiry anil Treasurer 

Writers: Juiiie^ nioiidworth. (Iharles Tedford, 

David Chandler, Carl Dudley 
Directors: Will Jason. Har\ey Dwi^ilit and 

Carl Dudley 
Editors: William Karis, Krnest Flook. Norman 

Suffern 
Cameramen: Edward Mutton. Edward Olscn. 

Edward Drews, Keith Covey 
Printing Department: Joe Raue. Manuel Chaidez 

Skhvicks: Industrial, theatrical and television 
motion pictures and slidefiims. 

F'acii.ITIES: Own studio, stage, lights, cutting 
room, sound and color production e(|uipment, 
cameras, printing; color (ilin lihrary; creative 
staff. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AM) SPON.SORS 
On the Trafk (Association of .Vrnerican Rail- 
roads I : FoihI for Thought (.National Pressure 
Cooker Company i : Southern California Holiday 
(Santa Fe Railway I ; Haivaiian Sports ( Warner 
Brothers I : Mealtime Mapic ( M-C-M I : Flif^hl to 
Greece (T-W'-A .Virlinesl: This Land of Ours. 
This K Drld of Ours. International Detective, 
You'rf So Smart. 



Jerry Fairbanks Prodlctions 

60.12 Sun.«et Boule\ard 
Hollywood 28. (ialilornia 

Phone: HUdsoii 2-1 101 

Date of Organization: l')2") 

New York Sluilio: LiT K. (<')tU Street, New 
York 21, \. Y. Phone: TRafalgar ')-X\-y2. 
Rohert Lawrence. Cliica;;(> (.^alesl: 919 N. 
Ml.lii;:an Ave. Phone: MOIiawk 4-5 l.'JO. 
B. N. Darling. 

OFFICERS AND DKl'AK I \1K.M IIKVDS 

Frank K. Mullen. Chairman 

Jerry Fairbanks, /'resident. Exec. I' rod. 

William (iernannt, y.P. {Sales), Exec. Asst. 

Rohert Lawrence, I .1'. (East. Prod.) 

Herliert Moulton. Prod. Chief 

Services: Industrial, theatrical and television 
motion pictures. 

F'acII.ITIE.s: U! camera units: 16mm and .'{.Sunn 
sound recording: Multicam process: editing: 
animation: 16nnn and .'{Sinm optics: Duoplane 
[>roccss: film and music lihraries; art and cre- 
ative staffs. 

RECENT TRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Tuhhy's Trouhlfs I Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Company I : tt aitiiifi for the liif^ Moment ( Ply- 
mouth Motors I: Rocket uitit the Sportsmen 
tOldsmohilel : .•!/> Power Is Peace Pouer ( F.ast- 
*rn -Vir Lines): Treasure Islands (Hawaiian 
Pineapple Company ) , 



P\l 1 .1. I' I NM I I ( .o. 

I l.")9 No. ||i;:hlan<l \veniir 

Hollywood '.M\. California 

Phone: (fLadstone Ih.*)? 

Mrunch: 10 K. tOtli .<^l.. New York l(.. N. ^ 
IMione: Ml rray Hill '>.l2(iK 

Date of Organization: I9I7 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

I'aul J. F'ennell. Producer 

Mickey Dubin, .Vew } ork Representative 

Skhvices: Public relations and U.S. Navy train- 
ing films: specializing in television commercials 
for the following s|H>nsors: Riiliard Hudiml. 
l-circl Mdliir (!iiinpan\. .American Telciihone and 
li-lcgrapli (!oinpun\. Ueech-Nut Packing Coin- 
pan). I ..S. Rubber Company, Maxwell House 
Coffee, (iunther Brewing Company. C. Schmidt 
& Sons, Campbell Soup Company. Shell Oil (lom- 
parn. National Tubcriulosis .Association. Moll's 
Appli- Products. Schacfer Brewing Ciompany. 
Empire Racing Association. 



Graphic Films ((lui'duviioN 

(Associated uilh Photo & Sound Prodiicti<iii-. 

.■san Francisco I 
1108 Lillian Way. Holly woo.l 38, California 

Phone: GRanite 2191 

.\ddress of Photo & Sound Productions: 

116 Natonia .St., San Franci-co r>. (!al. 

Phone: Yl kon 2-;M66 

Date of Organization: 1941 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

I^ester Novros. President 

Jerr\ Goldberg. / ice President. Production Chief 

William .Shull, Director of .inimation 

Noel I.eigh-Tavlor, Sales Representative, 

Script Adviser 

Services: Production of animated and live- 
action films for industry. Government and 

schools. 

Facilities: .Animation production. (.Also see 
Photo & Sound Productions, San Francisco,) 
RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND .SPONSORS 
The Man llfhind the K heel I Inion Oil Com- 
pan\ of California! : Sen-icinii Automatic Drives 
t Union Oil Company of California! : Polar .\av- 
ipation (animation, U.S. Air Force): Polar 
Ceoi-raphy .animation. U..S. Air Force! : Don't 
lie a If inter (.asually (animation, U.S. .Air 
Force): .-fir Force K'inp (U.S. Air Force). 



The J.iMi ll.iniK < >r;:anizatiun 

TiiK JvM llvNO^ Oi(i.\M/\Tii>\. Inc.. 70-Ui 

Ib.lKt I ll..ulc%ard. Lo> Angeles 2JI. Cjili- 

fornia. Phone: HEmpslead 5H0'^ (Service 

nffice, not sales. I 

t«<*e complete listing under Detroit. Mich. I 



Pol yiii» I'll 1 1 HI ^. K<:, 

.>8.'.9 W. Ihinl Street 

liOH .AngelcH .16, Culiforniii 

Phonex: York R<>.>K ami W Kb-ler .VKiOK 

D.ile of Organization: 19Ui 

omcERS VND DKPVHTMENT IIKMo 

Juan (!. Ilulchi'on. Prnidrnt. (•rneral Mnna/ifr 

Perry King, UiVr {'resident. Executiie Producer 

.Art Scott, Animation Protlucrr 

Jack Johnston, Camera 

Harris (iablr. Script 

Willard Sheldon, Production Control 



Services: E(|uipnient for live-action and anima- 
tion productions: contractors to I ..S. Army, 
.Navv and .Air Force; industrial and training 
films. 

Facilities: 16mm and .H.Snun. sound and color 
e(|uipiMenl owned for normal schedule: space and 
ecjuipment rented for additional needs. 

RECENT PRODLCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Aerial ,\'avipation — Dead Reckoning (L-S. Air 
Force!: Ilasic Instrument Flyin/i ( U..S. Navy); 
Toughest Inch (II. C. Price Company I ; Hook, 
Line ami Sinker (Richfield f)il Corporation); 
fli'g Creek (Southern California F.di><>n Com- 
pany (. 



.Meri I Hv International Pictires. Inc. 

III.') <!oa>t Bonle\ ard 
Corona del Mar. lialifornia 

Phone: Harbor 1212 

Dale of Organization: 1948 

Bkwcii: 2'MI F.ast Ohio Street. Chicago 11, 

Illinois. Ph.me: DEluware :-;«34. Walter B. 

Wentzel. Representative. 

OFFICERS \ND DKPXRTMENT HEADS 

V. E. ElUwiirth. President 

David L, Monahan, I'ice President 

G. C. Cable, Secretary 

Beatrice .A. T. Medes. Treasurer 

Creative: Lvle L. Robertson and David L 
Monahan: others through Screen Writers Guild. 

ServicE-S: Industrial, sales promotion, civic re- 
lations, theatrical and lelevisiim motion pictures: 
animation. prcHluct and pu(i(>et. 

Faciijties: I6nim and .S.Snun Mitchell and 
16mm (!iiie-S|)ecial caiiu-ras. Wi-stern doll\ : arc 
and incandescent illumination: grip, interior 
and exterior production: sound stage 60" x ISC', 
shooting stage 25' x W: screening and cutting 
rooms: dark room: dressing and makeup rcMnns: 
trucks. Sound recording on .'{.5mm film by (flen 
(•IcMin .Sound (!<mipany of HoIKwimhI. 

RECENT PRODlimONS AND SPONSORS 
The Outside Story (United States Gypsum C<mi- 
panv); .'Secret of the Masters (United States 
G\psum Compain i : Harden of the Sun (Tularr 
(!ounl\ (California) (!hanil>er of (^mimerc-e i ; 
California's Way of Life (Newj>ort Harlmr 
(California) Chaml>er of Cccminrrre I ; Meet the 
Duchess ( Aluminum Boat ('oiniMiny of Cali- 
fornia): television commerciaU for American 
Bivuit ond ("racker Coinpan\. Kellner Motors. 
S'ar«-Ro«4iuck jk (!ompan\. McHenry's Tad o' 
the Cork RestauraiiLv Sunkisl Coinpan>. North, 
rup Aviation Com|Hiny. 



Njw W mil II PunDl cTliiN^ 
.^T J't SiinM'l ltoiile\.ird 
Holly wihmI. California 

Phone: Hollywood <><W2T 

Dale of Organijtaliiifi: 19.19 

Bk*ncii»>: 221 N. ('tlrnwo<Kl Slrret, I'eoria. 

Illin.-is. 1.55 F„ .52nd Street. New York. N. Y. 

(COKTIMVCD ON THE rOLLOWIMC PACC) 



NUMBER 2 • \ ( 1 I I M K I J • I "» '. I 



53 



lAis a.\4;i<:ij:s 



Vric IT orlii I'rtiiliiitiitns: ('onlitiiii-d 

DKI'AKTMK.NT IIKADS 

T. C. Roliiiison. in Charge of Production 

V'al I.indlifrj!. I'nil Maniijier 

Micliacl Kiiad. (^nsliiifi Director 

Art .Suit. Animation Director 

Sti-rliiig Hariii'tl. Head C.aiucraman 

Service.s: Industrial. cdui-alixMal and television 
motion pitturcs. Kiinni and .'{3nun suunil and 
color: live action and animated cartoon films. 

Facilities: Camera and lighting eiiuipmenl: ani- 
mation department: creative stall. 

RECE.NT I'RODl t:TIOi\S .\Nl) .sfoN.sOK.^ 
Water. Fountain of Life ( Standard Oil Ctnn- 
panv of California I: Steel Builds the West 
(Bethlehem I'aiific Coast .*^teel ( j>rporation I : 
I'ursuit of Hapinness ( Amalfiamated Meat Cut- 
ters and Butchers): Human Kijilils t Anti-He- 
famatiun League — Catholic Youth Organiza- 
tion!: The Fossil Story I Encyclopaedia Britan- 
nica Films (: If hat Is a Co-Op? I The Co-opera- 
tive League I. 

Kdi \\t) Hkki) I'ltom ctions. Inc. 

2T.T So. Beverly Drive 

Beverly Hills. California 

Phone: CRestview 6-1101 

Date of Organization: 1932 

OFFICERS AM) DEPARTMENT HEAU.S 

Roland D. Reed. President 

r.uv V. Thaver. Jr.. \ ice President 

Hazel Hall. Director 

\^'alter Strenge. Director of Photojiraphy 

Roy Luhy. Editorial Supervisor 

Services: Sponsored training, puhlic relations. 
consumer sales and religious films: television 
commercials and features. 

Facilities: Major studio equipment and tech- 
nicians: creative staff. 

RECENT I'RODl CTIONS AND .SPON.SORS 
/ era Has Her If ay { Westinghouse Electric Cor- 
poration I : Double Exposure (Standard Oil 
Company of California): Johnny Goes to the 
Cleaners (Westinghouse): And Then There 
If'ere four (General Petroleum Corporation); 
Dinner at Six (Westinghouse! : television series, 
Trouble with Father, for General Mills. Inc. 

I See mention in film awards section) 



Frederick K. Rockett Compa.ny 

6(16.3 Sunset Boulevard 

Hollywood 28. California 

Phone: HllUide .3183 

Date of Orguni/.ation: 1924 

OFFICERS AND DKI'AKTMKNT HEADS 

Frederick K. Rockiit. <,rneral Manager 

Jack Shallow. Production Head 

Eric Strutt. Editorial 

James Conley. Studio Superintendent 

Alfred lliggins. Camera Depurlmeni Chief 

^KRvicES: Industrial motion pictures, slidefilms 
and television programs and commercials, 16nim 
and .35mm. 



Frcilrrict, K. liocLilt: ( itnlilltiril 

Facilities: Studio uilh lamcra and soumi re- 
cording ec|uiprnent: sound stage: standing sets, 
lighting and electrical e<|uip(ncnt. unimalion and 
trick film apparatus: dressing rooms: cutting 
and projection rooms: wooil and metal shops; 
location trucks; creative staff. 

RECENT PRODI C.TIONS AND SPONSOR.S 
11 heels for the If est (Kiihficld Oil Cc.r|>ora- 
tionl: Treasure Island I l{i( lificld ( : ,\eiada and 
Its \alural Resources { Kichllild ) : West I ir- 
flinia and lis Natural Resources (Weirlon Steel 
Company! : television films for Busy Bee Honev. 
(!liicken of the .">ea Tuna. Filter Queen. Kold 
Kist. Colundiia l?ro;i(l<:isling Svstcm. Ncshilt 
Iruit Products. Hiclilicld Oil (Corporation. I'.d- 
win H. Morris Companv. 



Rocket Pictures. Inc. 

6108 .'^anla Monica Boulevard 
Hollywood 38, California 

Date of Organization: 1943 

Branches: 5809 Harvard Road. Detroit, Mich- 
igan: Phone: Tuxedo 2-7762: George Netschke. 
1313 W. Congress Street, Chicago 13, Illinois; 
SEeley 8-1511; J. Harry Ebhert 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
J. Richard Westen, President, Gen. Mgr., 

Production Head 
Harlow Wilcox, Executive I .P.. Treas., 

Sales Head 

J. Harry Ebbert, Vice President. Eastern 

Sales Mgr. 

Kav Shaffer. Secretary 

Edward D. Robinson, Marketing Counselor 

Courtney Anderson, Creative Director 

Don Bartelli, Production Manager 

Services: Counselors and producers of indus- 
trial, sales and personnel training motion pic- 
tures, slidefilms and television programs. 

Facilities: Shooting stages; 16mm and 35mni 
sound recording: animation departn\ent and 
artists: creative staff: affiliated with laboratories 
used by major studios. 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
New Car Series -Dealer Salesmen Training ( De- 
Soto Motor Com()anv ) : .Sales Development Se- 
ries — Retail Personnel Training ( Rexall Drug 
Company ) : Human Relations Series — Bank Per- 
sonnel Training (Bank of America); Product 
Story (Lockheed Aircraft Corporation): Sales 
Personnel Development ."^I'ries- Agent Training 
(Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company): 
Product and Sales I)evelo|imenl — Dealer .Sales- 
men Training ( Hoflman Radio Corporation!; 
Aggressive .Selling Series (own account, basic 
sales training series for all manufacturing, whole- 
sale distributors and dealer salesmen!. 

John St iiiiitivM) I'ikidi ctions. Inc. 

201 No. Occidental Bouhvard 
Los .\ngeles 26. (California 

Phone: DUnkirk 2-8211 

Date of Organization: 1943 

Branch i FCastern Sales): 60 E. 42nd Street. 

New York 17, N. Y. Phone Murrav Hill 7-7813 



(11 IICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 
John F. .Sutherland. I'residenl. Gen. Mgr.. Writer 
Ross M. .Sutherland. Exec. I'. P.. Eastern Chief 

Charles E. Bordwell. \ . P.. Prod. Head 

(George (jordon. Associate Producer. Animation 

Roger M. Andrews. Assoc. Prod., Live Action 

True Boardman. Writer and Director 

Carl I rliano. Director of .Inimalion 

Services: Production of industrial, educational 
and television films: live action and animation. 

Facilities: (Jwners and operators of studio 
with sound stage; cameras and projection equip- 
ment: animation camera: mill and paint shop: 
Mats and sets: editorial department: creative 
unit. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AM) SPON.sOR.> 
Assignment for Penny (General Electric Com- 
panv!: Who Buys Your LivestockY (Swift & 
Companv): // ) ou Don't Watch Out (animated. 
Electric Companies Advertising Program!; twn 
animated educational films in Harding College 
series in theatrical release by M-G-M: 1951: 
75th Amiiversary film for .American Telephone 
& Telegraph Companv ; Pilot television film for 
Greatest Story Ever Told series for Goodyear 
Tire 41 Itubber Company; television commer- 
cials in 1950 for General Foods, Inc.. Armour 
and Company. Chicago Redbook. Daystrom 
Furniture. DeSoto Motors. Wildrool Hair Oil. 
United Fruit Com|)anv: Beechnut Packing Com- 
pany. Lincoln-Mercury. Kaiser-Frazer. Other 
clients for 1951: Savings Bank Association of 
New York. Magazine Advertising Bureau. New- 
York Stock Exchange. 

(See mention in film awards section) 



I'eLEHI.M. l.NCOKPORATEIJ 

6039 Hollywood Boulevaril 

Hollywood 28. California 

Phone: HOllvwoo.l 9-720.3 

Dates of Organization: 1938. California: 
1946. New York 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Joseph A. Thomas. President 

Peter Comandini. Executive Producer 

Peter Gioga. F. P., Sound Department Chief 

Berk Anthonv. Production Manager 

Services: Complete studio and production serv- 
ices. 

Facilities: 16mni and .35mm cameras: sound 
stage, recording, dubbing, magnetic and sound 
on film: disc music librarv: laboratorv process- 
ing negative, positive, reversal: color duplicat- 
ing: animation: title press: editing: storyboards. 
creative staff. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Television advertising films for Stokely-Van 
Camp Foods. White Stag Sportswear. Acme Beer. 
Nesbitt Orange Drink. (General PctroleunL 



W ilding Picture I'rodiictions. Inc. 
WiLDI.NG PlcTl RK Prodictions, Inc, 5981 Ven- 
ice Boulevard, llollvwoml. California. Phone: 
WEbster 0183. John Oser. branch manager. 
(Studio, stage facilities and screening rooms 
besides administrative offices. I 
(^see completi' listing under Chicago. 111.) 



34 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Rai'haei. ('. \Ai (ti.KK Sn Dios 

1714 N. Wilton I'hi..- 

Hollywood 28. Culiforiiia 

I'lioiip: (JHanito <>\2(> 

l)ul<- of Or-iuiii/ulioii: 1930 

Kkprksentatives: New York: Dii-ran Naliigiuii. 

153 K. 45th Street. New York 17, N. Y.: phone: 

PLaza 5-53.S6. Detroit: Richard Bonds. 623 

Fisher Huildin-;. Detroit 2. Miehif;an: phone: 

TRinity 3-3747. Chicago: John W . C.arnriek. 

66-1 N. Michigan Avenue. Chicago. Illinois; 

phone: VIOhawk 4-17HO. Minneapolis: trnest 

Clifford. 4()3() Ouentin Avenue. Minneapolis 16, 

Miiuiesola: phoni- WAInut 3 188 

OH ICKRS AM) IJKI'AKTMKNT IIKADS 

Raphael i). Wolff. Owner, Executive Chairman 

Lester W. Johnson. Comptroller 

Mai'Donalil Ma( I'herson. F.xfr. Dir., 

Creative l)e\)t. 

Arthur \\ . Ireutelaar. Exec. Studio Supervisor 

David Luric. Exec. Editorial Dcpl. 

James Moore. Exec. Director, Animation 

.Sally Assin, Executive Secretary 

\rlhnr C. Pierce. I'rod. Supervisor, Director 

Koril Heelie. Jr.. I^rod. Supervisor. Director 

>KRVICES: Industrial, training and institutional 
motion [lictures. sound and color; television pro- 
grams and commercials. 

F'acilities: Stages and general production equip- 
ment: mobile generator units and ecjuipment for 
location work: permanent staff of editing, ani- 
mation, music and creative personnel. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSOR.S 
Radar of Sellinp I National Industrial Advertis- 
ers Association in cooperation with Putman 
Publishing Company I : 6,01X1 Partners I Ford Mo- 
tor (lompanv • : This Is Life (American Meat 
Institute I: In Partnership with .\atiire (Inter- 
national Paper Company); All That's Aeu' in 
Ranpes ( Kelvinator I ; The Freezer Way to Bet- 
ter Living ikeKinatorl; 70 Years of Value 
(Leonard Ditision of Nash-Kelvinator Corpora- 
tion!; The Manic Key (Produced hy Wolff for 
sponsorship h\ advertising and sales promotion 
groups to consumers I ; More Water! and Accent 
on Accuracy ( both for General Klectric Com- 
pany 1 ; Handlinfi Materials in lite Steel Indus- 
try (Link-liell Comparn I : television commer- 
■ iai spots for Ivory Soap (Procter and Gandilcl. 
(See mention in film awards -icclion ! 

r.%MFir xoiiTii\vi:sr 

Or<'}<<»ii 

l.KON Altll |)H.\Mt Sn !)H)S 

( \\ e-d-rn < ^olortilni- i 

I.'i3() S.F.. |-.lc\cMlli Vxcniii- 

Portland I I. I )rcgon 

Phone: F.Mpire 2I.3'> 

Dale of Orguiii/alion: l')37 

I.eoniird II. Delano. Ownrr-Mamijier 

^KHVH Es: l(>mm industrial, educational anil re- 
ligious films: television; 35mni field service*. 
I'vi.ll.lTIKs; Own studio buililing with ').(MK1 i.i|, 
fl. of Moor space, housing motion picliin- and 
-lidctilm and other photographic activities, in- 
cluding aerial mapping. Field s«Tvice over Pa- 
cific Northwest for clients. Sound rquipmcnl 



including synchronous tafM* ami recording; 
script writing. 

RE<:ENT PRODICTION.S ANU SPONSOR.S 

Contriillinfi the .S'/ir/irc liuiluiirnt (Oregon State 
Hoard of Forcstr) I : Top of the Crop ( Rlue Ijike 
Puiki-rs. Inc.); According, to Thy Word ( Con- 

cnrdiil ('..Hegel. 

PlKHO-AllI ( !(»M MI.H< l\l. SllUIOS 

42<( S.W . W a-liinglon Street 

Portland. Oregon 

Phone: \\\{ .VI I I 

Founded W'lT^; Not Incorporated 

okkicers and department heads 

Claude F. Palmer. Owner and Manajier 
.Stivers W. Vernon. Assistant Manager 

Service.s: Production typical of area require- 
ments, i.e.. agricultural, recreational and indus- 
trial subjects. 

F'acilities: FquipmenI and |)ersonnel for "pack- 
age" productions or specialized services in 
sound, photographii- and lidioralory fields; 
proven still phi>lograpli\ methods applied to 
motion picture produc lion, i Motion pictures in 
the area are largelv small budget o|M'rationsi . 
Films produced b\ staff technicians and produc- 
tion executives in i-oopi-ration with afTdiated 
« riters and directors. 

KIXENT I'mtillClioN- VM> SPONSORS 
Filbert Valleys ( Northwest Nut Growers As.s«>- 
ciation); A'oic They Can Walk (second edition, 
for Shriners Hospital of Portland I; For the 
People (Portland Connnunity Chest I : This Is 
Oregon (.Standard Oil Company of California! ; 
in production; Portland, Where Rolls the Ore- 
son (Standard Oil i . 

\^'ii*iliiii|if«»n 

♦ « ♦ 

Merciry Internatii)>ai. Pictihes. Int.. 803 
Fischer Studio Building. Seattle 1. Wash. 
Phone: Seneca 2788. William F. McKee. 

I ~> I- lull li«(iiig on page 53.1 

ISOHTIIWKST M()TU»N i'l( II HKS 

I71A Thirliclli \\enu<- Wot 

Seattle ■>''. W .i«liini:lon 

Phone: (; \rlield (i.3*>l 

Dale of Or;:aiii/ation: l')27 

OKKICERS AND DKI'VHTMKM UK Mix 

Ra> Pauls<'n. President 

Edna C. Paulsen. Vice President 

SerM(:e.s; Industrial, agricultural and civic re- 
lations motiim pictures, 16mm and 35niin, c«dor 
and sound. 

F*< ii.ITIES: I6n)m and 35nun cameras, ll«dl & 
III. well: animaticin deparlnu-nl ; n-cording stu- 
dio; dubbing and nm>ic : vis; 16mm nnil 35nim 
laboratory: printing, <luplicalion: srripl writing, 

RECENT PRODt CTI«»NS \N|) SI'ONSORS 
Pacific Power i Pacific Power i> Light Cccm- 
pan\ I : Human Resources ( .Slatr of Washing- 
Ion I; Fly inn Farmers nj the Pacific \orthur\i 
(Northwest Farm Trio I : UeWalt Sous in the 
War Proiiram ( DrWoll. Inc. 1; Buildin/: DeWall 
Motors iDeWalt. Inc. 1; Shopping for the Farm 
Factory I Washington Coo(M-riiti\e Farnier* As- 
«K-iationi; Market U ise i Washington t^oojirra- 
live Farmrrs .AsMM-iation I. 



l*\riFII \OHTIIWKST 

|{\nii. Mot ION I'u.TiKE Company 

551 I I niver»ity W ay 
Seattle- 5, W a>liingtoii 

Phone-: kKnwood 7 KM). 7401 
and \ Friiioiil ()8U8 

Date of Organization: 1935 
Inc-orporalion : 1916 

OKHCtR> AMI IIKI'MOMKM IIKMi' 

Max IL Rarig, President 

Grace Turner, Vice President 

E. A. Rarig. Secretary and Treasurer 

Servi«;»:s: S|>eeialty: industrial job training 
films, chieflv 16min sound and c<ilor: safets and 
promotioiiai; TV spots. Mm, film distribution. 

Fai II.ITIEs: Bell & Howell 70 J S|>ecialist and 
70 F cameras: -MNl' magazines and various mo- 
tors: W»kW of lighting «'<|uipiiient, mostly Mole- 
Richardson; Western Fle«tric 16mm magnetic 
film ri-corcb-r. sMichroiious sound cutting tables; 
creative staff im luding siript writc-r and res<'arch 
director, motion picture director. <-amerainan, 
staff artist, sound engineer. Special representa- 
ti\e <d B<-ll & Howell Company. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Fallinfi Timlier (Pacific Northwi-st Liggers .\s- 
sociation!; West Coast Lumlter for Homes 
(West Coast Lumbermen's Asaocialion) : Yard- 
in/i Lo/is ( Pacific Northwi-st I.oggers .Associa- 
tion!; Tree to Trade (The LonglVII Lumlicr 
(!ompan> i; The 1/ngiV «/ Lumlter i W <--l (.oast 
Lumbermen's .-\».*iHialion I . 



lAWIIA 

For the convenience of our growing reader- 
ship in Canada and with the eoo|»cration 
of memlxTs of The As.s<Kiation of Motion 
Picture Producers and Ijiboratories of Cjin- 
ada we include ihi- following reports re- 
ceived from that country : 



Asm FY A CkIPPKN I.lMtTH) 

1<*() liloor Mr.-<l W e.l 

Toronto. ( hilario 

Phone: Kins-dale 7'XU 
Dale of Or;:ani/alion: I9J2 

OEEK ERs \ND DH'XRTMENT HKM)S 

Dan (iib«ciii. PrrMdrnl 

W . R. (;ibson. I . /'. J. B. (.rip|M-n. .*ieci.-Treas. 

Joel Aldrril, Sales Mfr., Creative Ihr. 
SehvuI-s; Industrial and Government publi<- re- 
lations motion pirlures. 

F\< IIJTII>: I6mm Cine .*"|m-» lal and .i.iiiiin ,\rri- 
lle\ cameras; ta|>r ri-mrdiiig. Ixilh svnclironous 
.iiid i)cin-»»nchroiiou«: I6iiim printer. 3.011(1 wall 
B.II \ Howell M.mIcI J: .realise staff. 

HE( ENT I'RtlDI CTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Projerl Pourr i RnMier ConMrurtnm Limiledl: 
Htfihiand /.epenW. (.hamplaini oj Tntlay. and 
Land of Blue Wnirr (all for the Ontario liovern- 
men! • ; U>l(t on ) out Dial I Radio Station 
( FRBl. 

(COKTIKICD 0> THE rOLLOWI\«. I'VCK) 



N t M II V H 



\ OI 1 M E 12 • 195 1 



lAXAIIA 



Associated Screen News. Ltd. 

2(MM» \(.rlli( lilTi- \\.nii.- 

MoiiIiimI. (,>ih-Ii<t 

IMic.iif: DKm.i IIKd 

Brajirlu"?-: N'aiucuiMT. \\ iniii|ic<;. Turdiitu 

okkii:krs AM) dkpaktment heads 

B. E. Norrish. I'reiiilent. Man<ii:ini;-/)irector 

W. J. Siiiplfton. iifHiTdl Mtiiiap.er 

L. K. \\i.-r\. Secrelar\-Treasiiri'r 

Mauriif MfUger. Tech. Suji'r. 

J. W. Caniplx-ll. Coml. Frod. Mpr. 

Gordon Sparling. Short Suhjerts 

Klfanorr |)unnc. .Irt Director 

Services: 16mni and 35nini induslrial. sales 
and eduralional motion pictures and slidefilms. 
Faciutiks: SouikI recording, titles, animation; 
laliorator\. Ansco Color lahoratorv 16 & 35nim. 
(See mention in film awards section) 
(Additional data in following issue) 

(!k\\> I K\ I IIM>. I.IMIl KI) 
|y hairniont \\emie 
Ottawa. Ontario 
Phone: 8-(M)85 
Date of Organization: 1939 
Branch Offices: 21 Dundas Square. Toronto. 
I'hone: EMpire 4.S2!).H. Dominion Square Build- 
ing. Montreal. Phone: HArbour 50()5. 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

V. R. Crawley. C.A.. ['resident. General Manager 

Graeme Eraser. Assistant General Manager 

Stewart Rehurn. Mpr. Toronto Office 

.\lasdair Eraser, Mgr. Montreal Office 

.S'nior Producers: George Gorman, Judith 

Crawley, Peter Cock. Irving Dooh, 

Quentin Brown 

Earl \'alley. Head. Sponsored Film Dist. Div. 

Gerry Kedey. Production Secretary 

Tom Glynn, Camera Defmrtment Head 

Rod Sparks. Sound Defiartmenl Chief 

John Maxtcd. Art and Animation 
Betsy Moshaugh .Macka\. Publicity 
Services: Motion pictures and slidefilms for 
Canadian and L'niled States industrv. Govern- 
ment and education: sound and editing for in- 
dependent cameramen, six provincial govern- 
ments and religious organizations from coast to 
coast. Distribution department. 

Facilities: Maurer. Cine-Special. Bell & Howell 
and E\emo cameras: blimps, dolly: 250,000 
watts of lighting equipment with mobile genera- 
tor: sound stage. Maurer 16mm equipment and 
six mixing channels, synchronous magnetic tape 
recorder. 16mm and .'i5mm dubbers. turntables, 
dist recorders: 16mm optical effects printer: 
16nim and .iSnim animation department; I.IXKJ 
stills contained in productions in 1950; music 
library and staff; script department with re- 
search library. Electronic sc-rvice department. 
IJluipmenl sales tiivision. 

RECENT I'RODI CTIONS AND .SPONSORS 
The Sti>r\ of I'ierre and Marie I Quebec I'ulp 
and Pajjer Safety .\s.<tociation i ; Child Develop- 
ment Series (McGraw-Hill T.xt Films, Inc.); 
/'in High (Hou.sc of Seagram I : Creative Hands 
Series i International Film Bureau. Chicago); 
Dutch Treat I J. M. S< hneider. Ltd. p : Acciden- 
tally Yours I Molsons Breweries). 

(See mention in film awards section) 



Pktkhso.n Prodi CTIONS 

Xil-'t kin-; Street \X est 

Toronto I, ( )ntario 
Plume: KMpin- .{-.">.'. KI 
Date of Organization: 1947 
S. Dean Pi-terson. Owner .Arthur H. Kyle. Mgr. 
Services: Producer of commercial and indus- 
trial films; color. TV film specialists. 

Facilities: Associated on a proiluclioii rental 
basis with .Sovereign Film .Studios. liolKwood. 
Ontario. Peterson Productions maintains a per- 
manent creative staff of five: does not operate 
laboratory facilities. 

RECENT PRODVCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Scientific Service ( Frank I). Crowder Com- 
pany I ; Feet First ( Sprove of Canada. Ltd.); 
Home Carvers (Sawyer-Stoll Lumber Com- 
pany) ; Operation Change-over (Canadian Com- 
stock Company); // Shall Xot Return I'oid 
(The Gideons International). 

QlEBEC PrODVCTIONS ( OKPOKATIO.N 

.ST St. James Street West 

Montreal, (^hiebec 

Phone: Harbour ,tI68 

Studios: St. Hyacinlbe. (^Miebec. Phone: 1960 

Date of Organization: 1947 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Rene Germain, /'resident 

Paul L.Anglais. I ice /'resident. Exec. Prod. 

Paul Emile Poirier. Secretary 

Richard Jar\is. Prod. & Editing Dept's. 

J. L. Trudel, Studio Manager 

Oscar Marcoux. .Soun<l Department 

Services: Production of motion pictures; sound. 
Facilities: Cameras, lighting, sound recording; 
cutting and projection rooms. 

RECENT PRODLCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Thirteenth Letter (Twentieth Century-Fox) : Son 
Copain {Que. Prod. Corp. and Electiques Films 
of France) ; Whispering City, La Forleresse, Un 
Homme et Son Peche, Lie Cure de tillage, 
Seraphin (all own account) : Sins of the Father 
(Canadian Motion Picture I. 

Shelly Films Limited 

258 So. Kingsway Drive 

Toronto 14. Ontario 

Phone: LYndluirst 8431 

Date of Organization: 1926 (as Vancouver 

Motion Pictures. Ltd.): Incorporated 1945 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

I^on C. .Shellv. President 

W . H. Shelly. / ice President 

D. W. Zufell. (.ompl. Edna Logan, Office Mgr. 

Clifford Bourne. Lah. Bud Burrows, Prod. 

.Services: 16mm and .'i.imm films, industrial and 
theatrical; complete service from writing to re- 
lease prints; color. 

Facilities: 16mm and 35mm cameras, sound 
recording and re-recording; Teihnicolor. Koda- 
chrome and Cinecolor shooting; editing; labora- 
tory. 16mm and .3.imm black and white release 
prints: creative staff. 

RECENT PRODI CTIONS AND SPON.SORS 
Vacation in Quebec and Oil for Canada (Im- 
|M-rial Oil Limited I: lieans of Bounty (Victory 
Mills. 1,1(1.1; lialteries for Today (Canadian 
National (Carbon Co.. Ltd.); \iagara the Pow- 
erful (Hydro Electric Power Commission of 
Ontario); Something to Chew On (National 



Film Board I : Chirpy Chicks (Canada Packers. 
Ltd. I: Guild (Om^inin i N.il'l. Breuerie«. I.ld.i 

SoVKHKM.N KlI.M StCDIOS 

1640 I'lie (^ueen!.way 

Hollywood, Ontario 

Dale of Organization: 1945 as Instructional 4» 

."^alo Productions. Ltd.: I9M^). name changed lo 

(^ueenstta> .Studios. Ltd. ( aililiate of J. Arthur 

Rank Organization): 195U, Sovereign Film 

Studios (Paul L. Nathanson ) 

OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS 

Paul L. Nathanson. President 

Frank F2. (J'Byrne. General Manager 

Norman A. Gunn. Lab. and Print. Dept. 

Stanley L. Clemson, Sound Studio 

C. F. Quick. Camera Dept., Prod. Superv. 

Services: Film production. 16mm and 35mm, 
sound and color; television. 

Facilities: Cameras, lights: sound stage: the- 
atre for recording and re-recording: editing; 
16mm processing and printing; 35mm proces- 
sing by Shelly Film Laboratory. 

RECENT PRODLCTIONS AND SPONSORS 
The Churches Work Together (World Council 
of Churches) : // Doesn't Cost — // Pays and The 
Open Road (both for Imjjerial Oil, Ltd.); Put- 
ting On the Ritz (Christie Brown and Co.. Ltd.) ; 
Marshall of the Mounlies (first of television 
series for George Hirliman Productions). 

Thatcher Film Productions 

10 Parkview Hills 

Toronto 13. Ontario 

Dale of Organization: 1939 

Leslie P. Thatcher. Owner and Producer 
Services: Producers of conunercial and indus- 
trial 16mm motion pictures. 
Faciuties: Camera, lighting and recording 
equipment; no laboratory. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
The Key lo Better Living and Crowning Achieve- 
ment ( both for Frigidaire Products of Canada. 
Ltd. I ; Save That Pig ( Canada Packers. Ltd. ) ; 
California Shoe Production ( Bata Shoe Com- 
pany, Ltd.) : The Quality of Mercy (The Salva- 
tion Army of Canada ) . 

\ t(.A IlL.Ms 

770 St. Antoine Street 

Montreal. ()iiebee 

Phone: I Niver>ity .3295 

) After June 1st. I Ni>ersity 6-2781 I 

Date of Organization: 1946 

Alan Moorhouse. President 

Reginald V. Gillman. / ice President 

Services: Production of 16mm motion pictures 
and 35mm slidefilms. 

Facilities: 8.000 scj. ft. of studio and darkroom 
space: 4<).(MM1 watts lighting: photographv. set 
building, cutting: sound ri-cording acquired on 
contract: creative staff. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
How Shoes Are Made (Shoe Manufacturers As- 
sociation of Canada); Breech Presentation 
( Reckitt and (dolman (Canada) Ltd.): The 
Noiv League Makes a .Signal ( Navv l^-ague of 
Canada): \asnl Cilia (Charles E. Frosst & Co. 
Ltd.); She Walks in Beauty (Canadian Silk 
Products Ltd.). 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 





KODASCOPE 



Pai^mnt 



SOUND PROJECTOR 



gives you Brilliant Professional 16mm. Performance plus New Ease of Operation 



Here's the tatesi thing in 16mm. 
sound projectors . . . ihe Kodascope 
Pageant. Kniirely new in design, it 
combines professional performance with new ease of oper- 
ation. Simple, guided threading and interlocking controls 
make everyone a good projectionist. And the complete unit 
in its compact, easy-to-carry case weighs only 33 pounds. 

Unusual brilliance in projection performance is assured 
by a new Kodak optical system. HIack-and-white or color 
pictures are realistically sharp and clear from corner to 
corner. A unique audio system and "sound focusing" con- 
(Tol give superb tone with dramatic realism . . . undisiorted 



at all volume levels, whether there arc two or two hundred 
in your audience. 

Ruggedly built and permanently pre-lubricated for the 
hard day-to-day use in schools, churches, business, and in- 
dustry, the new Kodascope Pageant Sound Projector will 
give you faithful service, year after year. Shoms sound or 
silent films, and, with connections for a microphone or pho- 
nograph, the Kodascope Pageant offers everything you 
need. Price $3' ^-00. .Many Kodak dealers have the Pageant 
to show you now, or write for the free b<K>klet, "l"he Koda- 
scope Pageant Sound Projector." Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany, Rochester 4. N. Y. 



Prict SMbj*cl to change uilboMl Holier. CoHsmll your Jejlrr. 




AN IMPORTANT TOOL FOR 

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 

FOR TR.MNINfi your cmplovees or dealers' sales- 
men • lOR SAMS and l'K().M< > IIO.N— to show 
provpects how your product is nijilc. how it works, 
the hcnrliis of its use • I ( JR I.Ul CATION and 
I N 11 R lAlN.MINT— in factories, schools. 
churchcv. vtitrcs. or homes. 



BUSINESS FILMS... demonstrate, train, 

dramatize, sell 




N I M It K R 



\ 1)1 I M K 12 • l^S I 




Kktikim. I'KtsiUKM l\. I', floiiait ( riiihl ) c.v- 
lends i-onpraliilalions to vice-president elect Dan 
Rochjord (center) as recnrdinii secretary Don 
Steinke I left) looks on. 



TllK Pkksimkm'.s I'i.\i,>i i: is aircn "lied" Hoi^an 
hy former I AV A chief executive O. H. Peterson 
Iripht) at the organization's annual dinner last 
month at Chica/io's Edtieualer Beach Hotel. 



lAVA Holds Fourth Annual Meeting 

ELECT GORDON BIGGAR 1951-52 PRESIDENT AS K. \>. HOGAN RETIRES 



Tlll> 'iKAK'S annual lAVA nii-elings lasted 
long and lale. a tribute to the Industrial 
Audio-Visual Association's contribution to 
its professional nienibership of industrial audio- 
\ isual executives and to the evcnt-|)acked pro- 
gram which the\ attended in Chicago from 
March 1') through the 21st. 

Gordon Biggar of the Shell Oil Company was 
elected president for the year ahead with Dan 




lUlLKDAUKKS All are (I. to r.) Jiill Lox f.Sanla 
he\ ; John Haukinson i III. Central I ; and Fred 
Beach (Sew York Central) at lAVA. 




Kochford of the Standard Oil Company of New 
Jersey as vice-president. Both men have been 
active in the organization almost since its in- 
ception. Re-eleclcd bv unanimous vote were 
John Hawkinson of the Illinois Central Railroad 
who (ontinues as lAVAs efficient treasurer and 
Don Steinke. Dow Chemical Companv, a compe- 
tent and appreciated recording secretary. Other 
officers named include Frank S. Rollins (Squibb 




Ka.stern Dl dks above are I'uul t. /'firm ( Su- 
cony-i acuum ) : Ralph Hoy (Alcoa): and Fred 
Riebel (Aetna). 




iMii.siin (.o.NfLHKNLK (I. to r.J are Ralph Hoy: 
R. W. Roth (U.S. Steel Corp.); Bill Cox: and 
Frank Greenleaf (U.S. Steel Corp. Sub.). 



Morons AM) On. pnl -_■ llnr (I. to r.) as ('.. R. 
C.oneway (Humble Oil I: James If'. Bosluick 
(General Motors I'holopraphic) : and James 
Craig (General Motors) chatted at lAl'A. 



& Sons): and Jack U'ade i Allis Chahnersl; 
I )ick (!onewa\ i lluinblc Oil I : and Vine <- liunler 
I liiioM l'a( iti( I as regional direcl<irs. 

Highlights of this year's annual program in- 
cluded premiere showings of outstanding pic- 
tures including Swift's Big Idea; du I'onl's The 
du I'nnt Story: Ford Motor Co.'s .-/mcriVon Coic- 
boy: and Geni-ral Mill-' Moilern Football. Mem- 
bers attended a ( oriipleic presentation of the 
prize-winning Inlaiwl .'*>tee| Compan\ employee 
program In Our Hands, introduced In Robert 
Wilson of Inland's industrial relations staff. 

A guided tour of \X ilding I'ictun- Produc- 
tions' (Chicago studios was a special "wurkshop" 
event, as was a special demonstration of Phone- 
vision, arranged by Commander F^ugene F. .Mac- 
Donald of the Zenith Radio Corporation. 

Other si)ecial program events included guest 
speaker Vere O. Smith. Training Aids Specialist 
of the Ninth Naval District, who spoke on "(Cur- 
rent Developments in the Navy's Training Aids": 
K. R. Franklin. National Livestock & Meal 
Board, who spoke on "Sponsored Filmslrips": 
and Dr. Albee O. Slade, director of the Ad- 
vanced Reading Institute. Chicago College of 
Optometry, who demonstrated the value of ""Ad- 
vanced Reading: Key to Better Business." 

An outstanding event of the program was the 
informal talk by Grant Leenhouts. Associate 
Chief of the International Motion Picture Di- 
vision, U. S. State Department, on the topic "Co- 
operation of Industry on the Conversion Story." 
Mr. Leenhouts discussed the need in our L . S. 
international information program of indu-stry's 
films as a mirror of American life and how in- 
(CONTINUED ON PACE SIXTY) 




Bi;ll S\stkm rcpresenluliies were lUjII John 
E. Powers ( ///. Bell I ; and Stan Puddiford 
(Michigan Bell). 




iMDIiVLM. MoMKNT uilh (I. to r.) J. H". Bees- 
myer ((Caterpillar I : U. M. Baslahle (Suifl & 
Co.); Frank Hour I Pan-American World Air- 
ways): and John Flory (Eastman Kodak Co.). 



B I S I \ E S S S f. R R F \ M \ (; \ Z I \ K 




InTV Film and Special Purpose Film Production 

pduiu Film Distribution, 
The Film Center Gives You ALL FOUR 



CONOMY 



• IXPK^OiNCi • ©^€ANI DZATOOINl •QUALDTY •! 

7 ///• PRl\Ci:i()\ HI M (F.MllK. IM... gives you j/i fonr of the basic 
ingredients required today bv companies and their agencies \s ho want to 
pnxluce films commensurate with the products they have to sell. II < ojjcr 
more film f)ir dolLir than .in\ other tjujlitx f)rodncer. Ma\ we prove it? 



Western Electric Equipped Sound Rcnuirding Studio plus 4500 sq. ft. Production Stage 

THE PRINCETON FILM CENTER, Inc. 



Since 1941 



NUMBER ; • \ I » 1 I M K I : • I <) '. I 



PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 



S9 



(CONTINUED FROM PACK 58) 
duslrial film sponsors ran cooptTalc 
in this jiroprarn \ ia i-\isting lilnis 
as »i-ll as on futun- |iroiUution. 

Till- \\ i'iliii-S(la\ si-ssiofis oiMMifil 
witli a roin|ilftf morning liri>{;raiii 
(i-altiriii): a "cavalcadf of amiio-vis- 
iial (-(luiiirntMit and dt-vices" at whicli 
a full raiifii- of projft-tion units for 
sali-s aiul di'nionstiation purposes 
was shown and diwusscd l>\ fx- 
pcrts. Walter Johnson. Soeiely for 
N'isual Kdueation vice-president anil 
educational head, denionstratod the 
special \alucs of the Spoed-I-Oscope 
anil niiiro-eidarpenient attachments 
for tilnistri[> ei]uipnient. Arthur 
Kolt. sales chief for Hell & Howell: 
John Postal, sales manager of 
Sound \ Visual Products for the 
RCA Victor Division of RCA: and 
Uohert Shoemaker, manager of the 
\'isual Aids Oivision. Operadio 
Manufacturing Company, were oth- 
er principal participants in this key 
program. 

The Inner Man Steps Out. a new 
(ieneral Electric attitude film, was 
introduced and special pointers on 
such films were given liy Henry 
Strauss of Pathesciipe Productions. 
New York, in one of the closing 
events of the Wednesday afternoon 
program. 

At the annual dinner on Tuesday 
evening, former lAVA president 
O. H. Peterson of the Standard Oil 
(.om|)any presented the president's 
plaque to retiring president R. P. 
t lied I Hogan. Altogether it was 
an eventful and most fruitful gath- 
ering of this professional group. In 
miles of film and depth of ideas, it 
»et .something of a record. • 



Chicago Film Studios Moves to 
Modern Studio Quarters 

♦ K\ niiil-April a veteran Chicago 
hlin production com|ian\ will occu- 
py new quarters when Chicago 
Pil.M .Stidid.s moves into its mod- 
irn motion picture studios at 56 E. 
."^uperior .Street on that city's near 
north side. 

Kunctional lavout of the new 
-ludios was planned to increase pro- 
duction rapacity, long needed to 
serve an increasing clientele of 
regular business film sponsors as 
well as television commercial pro- 
duction into which the company has 
entered in recent years. Completely 
fire|)roof. (he new studios have the 
willed protection of an automatic 
-prinkler systetn. 

Chicago Film continues to pro- 
V ide complete production and lab- 
oratory services, from initial plan- 
ning to finished |)rints. of motion 
pictures, slidefilms. and TV films. 
Mks. a. G. DuiSLAI' is president: 
R. I). Ca.stf.rline, in charge of 
~ales: Hai. Skcor manages the ere- 



NvmvN l>. (riii.nKN 
i rifiht 1 - his is the 
cvpcricnced guidinj; 
iianil which directs 
the Million Picture 
and Photographic 
Products Division 
of the National Pro- 
iluiiinn aullioril) in 
Washington. D. C. 
of ke\ importance 
ill lliis defense era. 





ative planning department: and 
CiKOKGE Jarkett is in charge of 
[)roduction. 

How to Survive the Atom Bomb 
♦ More light on the planninf; of 
protection against the atomic hondi 
is provided by VISUAL SCIENCES. 
Box 599. Suffern. N. Y., in an 80- 
illustration nontechnical fihnstrip. 
1 oil and the Atom Bomb, for the 



use of science teachers and ii\iliaii 
defense workers. 

Eastern Film Group Joins CIO 

* The Association of Documentary 
and Television Film Cameramen, 
fihn section of NABET. has affiliat- 
ed with CIO. NABET members re- 
cently voted by an overwhelming 
majority in favor of making appli- 
cation for a CIO charter. 




Brig. General Bock Nominated 
as New Chief Signal Officer 

♦ Ifllll.MMKll (iENERAI. GEORCE Ir\ • 

IM. Back will be the next Chief 
Signal Officer of the I . S. Army if 
ihc .'Senate ciiidirms the nominatioi; 
|p\ President Truman. Brig. Gen. 
Hack will succeed Major General S 
H. Akin, who held the office from 
\|iril I. 1947. until his rcliremenl 
fiiiin ihe Army March .'ilst. 

The Army Pk tohiai. Service, 
as a branch of the Signal Corps, 
w ill also be under the command of 
the new chief, who had been Gen- 
eral Douglas MacArthur's Signal 
Oliicer in Tokvo since 1947. 



Telecasting Loses Money Again 
But Triples Income in a Year 

♦ The telecasting industry lost mon- 
ey again in 1950 though it tripled 
its income to S105.8fX).0tM) as 
against the .s;U..S00.000 of 1949, ac- 
cording to ofhcial figures released 
by the Federal Commlmcations 
Commission. 46 of the 107 tele- 
vision stations showed a profit; 61 
shared the aggregate loss which was 
reduced from .«;25..^( Kt.OOO in 1949 
lu .S7.900.0(X) last year. 

Interconnectefl one-station com- 
munities led in profitable station 
operation, with 20 of 29 such sta- 
tions showing revenues higher than 
expenses. 

REFERENCE SHELF 

Progress in Photography. 46-1 
pages. 81 reports by 68 authorities. 
Published by the Focal Press, Lon- 
don. 

♦ Dr. Douglas A. Spencer, a deputy 
managing director of Kodak. Ltd.. 
iieadcd an editorial board of Brit- 
ish. American. French and German 
scientists in compiling this encvclo- 
pedia of photographic developments 
ill the last ten years. 

Eight photographic specialists of 
the Eastman Kodak Companv con- 
tributed to the volume. Four from 
the Kodak Research Laboratory 
wrote sections. Developments in 
ultraviolet and infrared photogra- 
ph\ are described b\ Dr. Walter 
('lark, head of the black-and-white 
|ihiitograph\ department. A study 
of photographic equipment and 
practice in the I nitp<l Stales was 
liiine in collaboration b\ Glenn E. 
Matthews and W illiam I". Walker. 
Processing and after-treatment are 
covered by John 1. Crahtree: new 
photo-sensitizing agents, by Henry 
C. .Slaehle: low-shrink film supports, 
John M. Calhoun: new color ma- 
terials and the techniques and ae- 
I urac) of color processes. Robert 
A. Morris: recording with galvano- 
meter oscillographs. William Y\ 
Swann. 



60 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



700 Attend Seventh Annual Convention 
of The American Society of Training Directors 



♦ The Sectional W iirk>lii>|i idea in 
operation at the seventh annual con- 
vention and e(|ui|)tnent exhibition 
of the American Society of Train- 
iiig Directors, held in i'hiladelphia 
Marih 15, 16 and IT, attracted 700 
key industrial training men in atten- 
datice from the 25 <Iki[)Iits. includ- 
ing those in Canada and Hawaii. 

Employe, supervisory and execu- 
tive development were the general 
subjects of workshop sessions, and 
training techniques headlined the 
afternoon gathering on the second 
day. 

Six Vi'oKKSHOPS Featured 

After the general session on em- 
ploye development, with Dr. Ilarrv 
(". Rountree of Temple I niversitv 
presenting the subject, six work- 
shops were held, on inducting new 
employes, job instruction, attitude, 
training female replacements, keep- 
ing employes informed, and help- 
ing supervisors to set up a joii- 
training program. Among the sjH'ak- 
ers were (]. W. Larkin. AnuTicaii 
Viscose Company: Dwayne Orton. 
International Business .Machines: 
and A. H. Houseknecht of the Esso 
Standard Oil Com[)anv. 

Dr. K. J. Koelhlisbergcr ..f Har- 
vard I niversity introduced the su- 
p«'rvisory development general ses- 
sion. Workshop topics and leaders 
were: training the new supervisor, 
C. M. Oberholtzer of HCA: indi- 
vidual coaching of new supervisors. 
C. C. Mac Andrews. E. I. du I'ont 
lie Nemours & Conipanv: starting a 
supervisory development program, 
T. O. Armstrong of Westinghouse 
Electric Corporation: training su- 
pervisors to connnuniiate with em- 
ployes. II. F. (iraccN of S-k-E In- 
dustries and II. I'. ZcIko of I'enn- 
sylvania Slate College: developing 
supervisr)ry leadership abilities. 
H. S. Beal, Hell Telephone Com- 
pany of Pennsylvania: and follow- 
up of supervisory training pro- 
grams, bv Einii>ln Atkiss of the 
\llantic Kefining Company. 

\t the session on training tech- 
iiiques 0. C. McCreery of the 



Aluminum Company of .America 
disiussi'd the preparation of visual 
and written aids and Dr. Koethlis- 
berger spoke on the use of case 
studies. 

Executive DEVELOPMEiNT Clinics 

1 nder executive development, 
w ith the general .session led oil b\ 
I homas C Spates of Yale I niver- 
sity, the wiirkshop topics and s|)eak- 
ers were: appraisal and selection, 
N. G. Asbury of the George Elliott 
(Company: starting a program, 
George B. Corless of Ksso: using 
academic persoimel. Ralph I lower 
of Harvard Universit) : training by 
job rotation. Harry Judson. Con- 
.solidated Edison Cimipany: train- 
ing by a centrali/ed lompanv staff, 
E. H. Reed. InteriKilional Harves- 
ter CompanN : and the philosophy 
of administration of the programs, 
by Earl G. Planty of the Johnson 
& Johnson Com|)anv. 

Robert Peare, General Electric Ad 
and Public Relations VP, Passes 

♦ The death "f RoBKKT S. I'eARE, 
the General Electric Company's 
vice president in charge of public 
relations and advertising policy, re- 
moved an executive who was hon- 
ored in I'JM) with an award from 
the National Association of I'ublic 
Relations Counsel, Inc.. for "the 
greatest contribution in the past 
year toward improvement of the 
techni(pies and a|>plicalion of pub- 
lic relations from tlii- professional 
and ethical standpoint." 

Vice President Peare hi'.d super- 
vision over the company's advertis- 
ing, broadcasting and general pub- 
licitv activities, and was chairman 
of the general advertising commit- 
tee. He directed the operations of 
the eight broadcasting an<l tele- 
vision stati<ms of the companv. 

Demby Company Names Film Chief 

♦ I III lli\iii\ ('oMl'WV. television 
and radio package agenev and pub- 
lic relations consultants, has addeil 
a inotiim picture production de|uirl- 
ment headed by MvHON L. Bkoun. 



TRANSMISSION "T" Stop Calibration 



DESIGNING and 

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Ol 

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Animation Equipfflcnl 

MOTORS (or 
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and Bolei Cameras 



LENS COATING 



■.. fc.i-_i'*»jr.,.iA.. 



John C/*m«n5 — Brwin Horwood 

NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT 

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RENTALS — SAIIS 

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Cine Special Cameras 



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"■altar" lenses and 

otiiers lor Motion 

Picture Cuieras 




DON'T BUY WITH 
YOUR EYES SHUT 



If you don't loolc before you buy you are likely to get out- 
moded equipment. 

The Picturephone Is basically different from all other sound 
slidefilm machines. 

It is definitely and positively superior. 

It sets you free from the common faults of old-style machines. 

It has these vital qualities: 

Speach II aoiily undcrilood b«out* lound it (only diitribuUd 
lo every part af the room. 

Microgroox re<ordi con b« ployed b*<aute the machine ild Rot 
ond hoi no wobble. 

No colch lo come looie ond collopte the mochine on Ihe Root. 

Ho« carrying capacily (or omple tupply ol record! and tiait. 

Hat ihodow-boaed tcreen for tmoll owdiencet, mohing good 
picturei potkible in undorkened room. 

I( you ship (rom meeting to meeting you don't need a thipping 
container. 

And IS other odvontogei not potieiied by eld-ityle aochinet. 



Numerous users liove swilched from old-fashioned equipmenr 
(o Ihe Picturephone. 

We monufocture ten models — everything from Ihe midget 
machine vireighing 14'/^ pounds lo Ihe gian( auditorium 
model with capocily for 2,000 people. 



0. J. McClure Talking Pictures 

inSH WEST WASHINGTON BLVD. 

CHICAGO 7. ILLINOIS 

CAnal 6-4914 



NIMHF. R 2 • vol I MF 1 



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61 



B1TSI!\EJ!»S SCK 




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f't lil h KIIMIUNS Sn(IKI'> SPONSORS \ll)|(>.\ISl \I I) \'^ 




OxKli Iwd IliNDKKli MlKUK.-r ./</ ami public relations executives heard Frank Arlinnhans. 
firesidenl oj Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc.. f .standing) deliver the luncheon atldre.Ks 
at Audiol i.tual Day. Seated jar rifihl i.s Mr. James J'edder. Dearborn Motors' vice-president 
in charpe of advertising and public reltitions and a featured speaker. Foreground (I. to r.) 
are \athan Jacobs, Robert I'. Carey, and (). H. Coelln. jr.. all members of the clinic pro- 
gram committee. 




James Pedder, Dearborn Motors' ad chief. .Kvdhi-Vi-^v \\.V.qvwmt.\t uas a featured pan 

pictured during his visualized pre.ientation of of this fir.it Public Relations .Society clinic 

the uidely-shoun "Salute to .igricuUure" program. A view of the Bell & Howell booth 

program. j^ shown above. 



Film Froduction Executives served as a panel of experts on "Client-Producer Relation- 
ships. Seated ll. to r.) are: George Schuyler. Wilding Picture Productions: George Becker. 
\ ogue-W right Studios: Joseph lietzer. Sarra, Inc.: Norman l.indquist. Atlas Film Corpora- 
tion: Mercer t rancisco. Francisco Films: George Finch. The Jam Handy Organization- and 
Dallas Jones. Dallas Jones Productions. O. II. Coelln. Jr.. .served as moderator 



• 





I.V. lAi'KHT Spknckr Allk.n IWGS-Tl ) (left) 
and Public Relations Society vice-president Rob- 
ert Carey (center) are shown above with Sathan 
Jacobs, president of Bozell & Jacobs, and chair- 
man of the first annual Atidio-l isual program. 



Audio- Visual Clinic Events 

•K Motion picture films are proving a most 
effective medium to corporations and non-profit 
organizations in harking up the free enterprise 
story. Frank Ariinghaus. president of Modern 
Talking I'icture Service, told 2iV.^ registrants to 
the audio-\isuai aid clinic sponsored hy the Chi- 
cago chapter of the Public Relations Society of 
America on F"ehruary 27. 

"In numerous cases, millions of Americans 
have witnessed and retained the message of the 
praiticalily and superiority of the profit system 
over other systems within a few months of the 
time industrial films have been released to 
school, church, men's and women's groups." the 
speaker said. 

"And the message is arriving none too soon, 
for recent opinion surveys show that high school 
and college students are from 50 to 100 per cent 
more in favor of government control of enter- 
prise than are adults." 

TwKLXE Give "Case Histories" 

Registrants at the clinic, drawn from seven 
tnidwestern states, heard representatives of 12 
lompanies and associations describe the tech- 
niques and equipment used successfully in their 
public and industrial relations programs. 

Onrgc K.itinper and A. V. Steflen of Swift 
and Company demonstrated the value of the 
liannel board and the animated cartoon film in 
getting across subjects concerned with employee 
relations and economic education. Audience re- 
action testing on the field use of black and 
white films in public education was explained 
1>\ \V. A. Lehnert of Illinois Bell lelephone. 
\n illustrated talk on visual aids in employee 
recreation and group training was delivered by 
W. II. IIar\ey of the Klectromotive Division of 
(Jencral Mdlors. Glen F. Grilhn of the National 
Safetx (Council showed motion an<l sound slide- 
films on employee safety. 

All. Tvi'Es OF Aids Are Included 

In the educational field. Sam L. Austin of the 
(.hicago Mercantile Kxchatige used a transpar- 
ent projector to demonstrate how a program 
can be put across before small groups, while 
Mitchell Lachman of the Barton Distilling Com- 
pany utilized an opaijue projector for the same 
purpose. Mrs. Kathr\n Niles of the Poultrv and' 




PKS A l'nii(.n\M CoMMITTEK memhers iterr 
(I. tor.) Charles H. Cory; O. M. 6eirriV/pe; Vn- 
ihan Jiirohs, chairman: Robert I'. Carey: anil 
O. H. Coelln, Jr. of Business Screen. 



Egg National Board clemonstratiMl a tilinstrip 
in a honu" pconotnic fducalion talk. 

Thomas Vi . Hope of General Mills showed 
Assignment, General Mills which the eonipany 
uses to hrinp the faets within its annual report 
to regional slocklioliler meetings across the 
counlr\. The pholo lihrar) as a pulilic relations 
asset was descrilied liv Nick J. I'arrino of the 
Cities Service Company. James I'l-dder. vice- 
president in charge of advertising and public- 
relations for Dearborn Motors eniplo\ed charts, 
slide fdnis and motion pictures to demonstrate 
a hiphlv successful and well-intepriiled audio- 
visual aid program put on by his lompany - 
"A Salute to Agriculture." including the color 
niiition picture. Waves of Green. 

Hkkklky Teixs Story of "Last Date" 

The public interest service |iro\ ided by films 
shown in commercial theatres and clubs was 
demonstrated by Karl V. Heffley of the l.umlier- 
nien"s Mutual Casualt\ Company, based on /.<i-s/ 
Dnif. The adaptation of Hlm~ to lelcvision was 
desirll>e<l liN Spencer \llen. tttll-knnwn news 
commentator and execuli\e of WlA-TV. Two 
additiorial films were shown The Mafiir Key. 
produced bv Raphael C WolIT Studios to tell 
the historv of advertising and visual public re- 
lations and winner of a recent Freedoms Foun- 
IIONTINIED ON PAGE SEVKNTV-SIXI 



(il EST Si'EAKEK frank .'triinfihaiis of Moilrrn 
Talkinii I'icture Service. Inc.. is shoun heloii 
uilh Koherl Carey, vice-president oj the I'uhlic 
Relations Society Chicapo Chapter ichich spon- 
soreil the audio-visual program event. 




"The (III FonI Story" 

A TECHNICOLOR EPIC WRITES 
NEW CHAPTER IN FILM HISTORY 

■^ For man\ months the business film world has 
known about a big Technicolor pro<luctioii in 
the works for Dl Pont. Kumors have Xnt-n 
heard: "They're spending a million bucks on it." 
"It's wonderful." "It stinks." "Il'« t>K. but 
what'll they do with it'/ " 

The picture finally was releas4-il last month. 
A good estimate would be that they S|>«nL, ur 
will have spent, a good million or more on it. 
Its wondi-rful. And thev >till have not decided 
what t<i do with it. 

Now Being Shown to Employees 

First ofT. 7"/ie (/(/ Pont Story will Ik- shown in 
a .S5mm. 72-minute version to some !1,5.(KKP ilu 
Pont employees in all plant towns. Si\tv (H-r 
cent of du Pont |>erson!iel has joined the com- 
pany in the last ten years. It is fell that the 
film mav help to instill in the newer members 
the same [iride in the background and traditions 
of du Pimt as the old timers have. 

Kight now. 16min prints are not available, 
and reijuests for outside showings cannot !«■ 
filled. There is some talk that a .'{.5-tninute ver- 




A Tradition Begins as Eleulhrre Irrnee du I'ont. 
founder of the company, and his uife. Sophie, 
proudly examine the first advertisement of hlasl- 
inii ponder nrarh a centur\ and a half aiio. 

sion and four hi five I.S-minute films may Ih- 
whittled out of the big pi< lure, but much de- 
|H-nds on such (actors as film supplv. ie<'hni- 
I'olor's vicissitudes, cost, and how |H-ople seem 
lo lake to it as it is now shown. 

Il could no| fail lo inleri-<t llie conipnnv'> 
I2.S.INMI stockholders, and unili>uble<lly >ome 
consiileralion is iH-ing given lo finding a method 
III present ihe film to them. 

Iliiwever. and to whoiiirvrr it is «hiiwn. il 
wnuld l>e a shame lo cut ihe film down Iihi much, 
for il covers n lot of lerrilorv in 72 niinules, 'Ml 
|MT cent of il firsi class >lulT. iMilh as a niolion 
pii'lure and as hislorv. 

The du Pont family has iMcupinl a proniinrni 
place in American life and \mrrican induMrv 
for ainiosi a cenlurv ami a ludf. The du I'nnl 
.^lory givFO a g<MKl m-ord of wlial ihry have 
done. 

While il is true that no rfTort wan made tu 




r(il>Av'» l.t vliKHs Crauforil 11. Croiirualt, 
presulent. and (Charles .4. l.ary. vice-president 
1 1, lo r.) /»/«> their oun f>arts in "The du I'ont 
Story," new Technicolor feature. 



drag every skelrton from Wilmington's clowla, 
the Familv is depicted as a pretty human lot, 
with some failings and few fabw- heroics. On 
several (xcasions in the film, executives are seen 
dis<-ussing the proposition of intro<lucing new 
developments l>ei'ause thev may Im- anil how 
industrv weas«-ls on this word — -"profitable.** 

Covers Careers oe 10 Pri:sidents 

The du I'ont ."^tory employs the admiiiiMra- 
lions of the company "s ten presidents us con- 
venient chapters in telling the history of the 
cnmpanv. Kleuthere Irenee du Pont de Nemours 
Is shown as the vnuiig French immigrant who. 
I'ncouragi-d bv Preslileiil I homas JefTer»on, es- 
tablished a new companv on the banks of 
Hran<lvwine Creek, to make gun [Miwder. 

\mong the milestones depicted is ihe regime 
of llenrv du Pont, who held the longest presi- 
denlial tenure, from UlSlI to \i\iV). During this 
period came dvnamile to share the explosives 
field with black powder, and the expansion of 
the coni|jaiiv outside \X ilmington. IVlaware. 
This p<-riod also was marked by the invention 
of the chea|>er blasting agent. "s4>da powder." 
bv the founder"s granilsoii. the first l-anniioi du 
I'onl. 

(Ilher high points incluile the launching of 
the company on its broad program of diversifi- 
cation in the early years of this century, under 
ICONTINIEDON PACE SEVENTY -FOIR I 



Prim. Kiss IN \viiitii V (i.t the du Pant's founder 
is emouraped /'» I'resuleni Thomas Jefferson 
I riphl I to help free this nation from deftrndence 
on Inreien tourret lor vital materials. 




NIMH K K 



• \ (II I M t I 



I4S1 



M 




ABitVK: I'rojfititm nunn st-ttt/i ill If ilii- 
in/f Picture Proihictions Chirafio stitiUos, 
shouinn ihr J.4\ Moilel t Drtrt "l'ro"\ 
lOmm soitnil twit pirtlirf i'ifiii[tnu'nt liscil 
thfrr lor all major Ibmm siretrnings. 



Armed Forces' Standards Guide 
To Producer Screening Needs 

if TluTc now «'xisls the high stand- 
ard f(ir piirtahlt" 16rnMi sound mo- 
tion pirturi' e(|uif>Mifiit set hy pro- 
curenipnt ofliciTs and engineers in 
the basie specifications for the JAN 
(Joint Army Navy) model 16nini 
sound projectors now being pro- 
duced for these services. The suc- 
cessful bidder to first answer this 
need was the DeVrv Corporation of 
Chicago. Special permission has 
now been granted DeVry to di- 
»ert some of its present Army-Navy 
production of the JAN or DeVry 
'"Pro" model to meet the needs of 
film studios, manv of whom are also 
producers of training films for the 
armed forces. The General Pre- 
cision Laboratory ( Ampro Corpora- 
tion) is another JAN supplier. 

As a Navy motion picture engi- 
neering specialist recently revealed, 
"all 16mm films, now being pro- 
cured b\ the Navy Motion Picture 
Exchange, are tested using the JAN 
equipment in order that picture 
and sound quality may be judged." 
The Navy's owti production facili- 
ties at Anacostia are also incor- 
porating the recommended Society 
of Motion Picture and Television 
Kngineers" sound characteristics.* 
The JAN machines are used exclu- 
sively by this ai'tivity for the pur- 
pose of test inn f'!'"" j<>r hijih qual- 
ity oj sounil and picture. 

The business and training film 
producer has other basic reasons 
for consideritig this c(|uipmcnt in 
his screening room: (1) confirma- 
tion that both sound and picture 
quality in his first screening print 
meet standards; and (2) greater 
safety of valuable color originals. 

Thanks to the services and to 
the equipment manufacturer, the 
present high stanrlards set by the 
SMPTE arc attainable and avail- 
able on this sound equipment. 



Swif( Premieres "Bi^ Idea' 



KMI'LOYEES "STAR" IN ()rTSTANI)l\(; M W IMCTrHK 



•♦' \ challenging motion |)icturc- 
diania dealing with the conflict of 
ideas now <lividing the world has 
been released h\ Swifl & Coinpaiu 
to cmpli>\cs and pui>lii'. 

Called liiii Idea, the new ."^wift 
film achieves docujnenlar\ effect in 
its graphic portrayal of the liberties 
enjoyed by Americans of all walks 
of liife. The "liig Idea " is that the 
people, rather than the slate, are 
the real foiindalion of our coun- 
trv's strength. 

W. M. Bastabl.'. head u( the 
firm's film division, previewed Bi^ 
Idea before the Industrial Audio- 
Visual association annual meeting 
at the Kdgewater Beach hotel. Chi- 
cago. With Swifl sinci- 1915. Bas- 



lidile is a veteran of 2.'J years of 
motion picture making. He ma<le 
his first sponsored film for Inter- 
national Harvester in 1928. 

I'lainied as a public service con- 
Iriliulion to the nalioirs fight 
against subversives, liiji Idea was 
completed by working around lin- 
clock at Wilding Picturi- Produc- 
tions. Inc.. on Chicago's near north 
side. Baslabic told the association. 
"In addilioM to llolKwood players, 
more than I'M) Swifl eniploves take 
part. We're particularly proud that 
the employe stories told are real- 
life, told in their own words li\ the 
emjjloyes ihemsplvps."' 

Edward M. Grabill of Wilding 
directed, and James Prindle was the 



UAr. ' 



la-nin H«ili-« 
• Cht. E. \\ 
19S1. 




AMERICAN Cuanamid coMPAivy 



TIXTIIE MSIN OfPARTMINT 







PATHESCOPE PRODUCTIONS 

MOTION PICTURES • SLIOEFILMS • TV 

580 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

PIAZA 7-5200 



wriliT. Photography is by John 
Niklas<'h. sound by Hav Ksh anil 
(nusic by Benny Kyte. John Cook 
is film editor. 

Public Pkkmikrk at Omaha 
Hip, Idea received its public pre- 
miere at a run of six performances 
which began .Saturday, .March .'il ai 
the Omaha Theater, in Omaha. 
Neb., where much of the film wa> 
made. In Chicago it was to show 
first to employes and friends at llir 
International Amphitheater A|)ril 
I. 1-1 7. Other early relea.ses an- 
.sche<lulcd f<ir New Haven, Comi.: 
Montgomerv. Ala., and Ocala. Ha. 
Swift is making Hip Idea avail- 
able for public audiences in each 
locality following employe show- 
ings. In addition to the standard 
55 minute film on both .S.5min and 
16mm slock, a special 2fi minuto. 
16nim version has been tailored to 
fit classroom, club and television 
programs. The Swift public rela- 
tions department is handlitig distri- 
bution. 

Story of a Frkic People 

The story of Bip Idea is the story 
of what makes America strong — a 
free people. When a Voice of Amer- 
ica announcer challenges his listen- 
ers to disprove his claims about 
American liberties, he is answered 
by a girl reporter from an "iron 
curtain" country and an American 
newspaperman who is a "fellow 
traveler." 

They arrange a tour of a typical 
essential American industry to talk 
to labor and management, to visit 
homes and factories — in short, to 
see for themselves what makes 
America tick. They discover the 
"Big Idea" about America, that 
here the individual is free, rather 
than a slave of the state. 

W hat happens to the girl from 
totalitarian Kurope and, more im- 
portant, what happens to the Amer- 
ican newsman, makes a timely hard- 
hitting story. 

I billy wood players include Veron- 
ika Palaky. an Kuropean dramatic 
actress recently described bv- CBS 
Television as the best of 5,500 ac- 
tors and actresses auditioned over 
the last several years; Milhurn 
.Stone, a veteran of some 178 Holly- 
wood pictures, and James Bannon, 
who plays "Red Ryder" in westerns. 

Three Phoenix TV Commercials 
Are Completed by Sarra, Inc. 

♦ .V series of three television coin- 
iiiercials on women's fashions has 
just been finished by Sarra, Inc., 
for the Phoenix Hosiery Com- 
pany. In work for (Jold Seal's 
(Mass Wax are two with Tonv Mar- 
vin as narrator. 



64 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




JoSKl'll Slkmn 
heails HIS jilin imblicily 



Slevin Directs BIS Publicify Unit 

j ♦ JoSKl'll Si.KMN. who now (liifcts 

i the pulilii'il) section of the filnisi 

I and promotion division of British 

Information Services, since the 

retirenieiil of Mrs. Grele Tehhilt ti> 

private life, was advertising and 

pulilicit) manager of Nu-Art and 

Telecasl Kilms. Inc. He started w ith 

Madeleine (larmll Film'. 

Bank Shows Council How Film 
Forum Builds Community Center 

♦ SiKce.-sful application of the lilm 
forum idea lo a hanking institu- 
tion's puhlic relations operation was 
demonstrated by representatives of 
the RowERV Savings Bank at a 
luncheon meeting of the New ^ohk 
Film (".oi NCII. which was held i.n 
March 14th. 

I sing the -Simmel 19t7 produc- 
tion Teamwork, showing six meth- 
ods of winnitig the cooperation of 
high school slu<lenls. the gui-sl 
group criipliasi/e<l thai the forums 
achieve their pur|)ose of liuilding 
interest in the bank and. above all. 
establishing it as a community 
center. 

Speakers included Chester \X . 
Schmidt. assistant treasurer; 
Thomas I.. Cotton, consultant: and 
Miss Catherine Copeland. who con- 
ducts the forums. 

A presentation b% the Army Sig- 
nal Corps Pictorial Service was 
l>eing lined u|> for llic next Couniil 
meeting. 

New CIO Film Division Catalog 
Lists More Than 85 16mm Films 

* Mole llian i>.S liinis in ll>Mini 
sound are listed in the CIO KlI.M 
Hivimiin's rex is<-d catalog of "Kilm* 
for Ijdior and How to I »e Them." 
Amotig the new films is I niiin ill 
U ork. purchasable at $(i<l and renl- 
ing for $-1. The catalog. CIO I'ub- 
lieation No. 1 76. sells al 2.i ci-nl> a 
copy, five for 81. .Vddress the (!IO 
Hepartment of K.ducalion and He- 
M-arch. Til". Jaikson I'lace \.\\.. 
^^ ashinglon (f, 1). C. 



Gray Demonstrates Color TV as 
industrial Communications Tool 

♦ Color television as an industrial 
communications medium receiveil 
the attcniiiin of \isilors at llic an- 
nual exhiliitlon of llic lii-tlluir of 
Radio Kngiiieers in New ^ ork Cil\ - 
Grand Central Palace, when thev 
saw both a live color show anil the 
resultant color television piclun-^ 
using the new (!BS system. 

I he demonslralion was in tlic 
boolh of the Gray Manufacluring 
Comjiany. parent eompanv of the 
(ira\ Kesearch \ Devclopmenl (^om- 
pan\. which makes the iiiduslrial 
color reci'i\ers u.-ed. The camera 
chain- color camera and monitor 
was operated from the com|iafi\'s 
main floor booth, and addilional 
receiviTs were in u.-c on the third 
llix.r. 

The booth also was a demonslra- 
lion center bir the Telop television 
optical projector, the sound effects 
console, and the Gray Audograph. 
electronic recording device, all (ira\ 
products. 

"Daybreak at Udl," British Award 
Winner, Made Available in 16mm 

* British .Academy Award winner. 
Daybreak in I'di. now available in 
lOnim. tells how natives built a 
maternity home for themselves. 
The Nigerian government cooper- 
ated with the Cirowii Film I tiit for 
the Colonial Ollice. \\ rile BhITIsII 
Inkdrmvtidn Services at .}<> Bock- 
efeller Plaza, New York 20. The 
l.i-minute film sells for .S12.S. rents 

at .$6. 



DURING THE LAST 20 YEARS OF 




PRODUCTION OF INDUSTRIAL 
AND EDUCATIONAL FILMS 
THE NAME OF 

PAT DOWLING 

HAS BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH 
FILMS AND SLIDE FILMS 
OF HIGH MERIT AT 
REASONABLE COST. 



Recent films have been produced for such companies os: 

International Harveiter Company . . . Swift and Company . . . 
Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Auociation . . . Standard Oil Company 
of California . . . California and Hawaiian Sugar Refining Cor- 
poration Ltd. 

During the wor period of 1942-45 Dow/ing directed 
many training fifms and slide films for: 

The U. S. Navy . . . Doujilus Aircraft Compuny Ttit- U, S. 

Office of Education and ottten. 

Ask about our service on finishing 
and sounding your own company films. 

PAT DOWLING PICTURES 

1056 So Robertson Blvd. 
Los Angeles 35, California 



RE.4CHING THE "BLUE CHIPS" OF BUSINESS FILMS 



♦ For more than a decade, BUSI- 
NKSS SCBF.KN has In-en the one 
national business journal .serving 
the special interest of large and 



small business firms utilizing the 
full range of audio and visual tools 
for training, selling, and oilier 
pur|M>s<-s. i{.(NN) copies this issue. 



AcjxUn the (lecx^nd Spjeahl ^an> 9U^. . . 

The Taylor Instrument Comp>anies, American Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, Pennsylvania Water & Power 
Company, Aluminum Company of America, United 
States Rubber Compony, WildrooJ Company, Reid H. 
Ray Film Industries, Herbert M. Steele, Meridian Films 
Corporation, and McLorty Picture Productions are but 
a few of the sponsors and producers who, in 1950, 
joined the growing list of clients who have employed 
us to plan ond write more than 215 motion pictures. 

THE COMPLETf FILM WRITING SERVICE 

GUARANTEED ACCEPTABILITY 



709 ATLANTIC IIDG. 



930 r SHUT nw * washinoton 4, o. 

* IN NIW TOIK, INTIiriltl tSaS * 



c. 



IXICUTIVI S941 



N I M B K R 



• \ 1 1 I I M t 



• I 'I \ I 



65 



U.S. Rubber Sponsors New Film 
On Broad Range of Products 

♦ rill- iliMTsiliril |irii|><Tlii'>- of ml)- 
Imt. Imw till' iiiilustr\ •;ni'> ;ilii<ul 
making rul>lH-r |iri><lui'l>. inrluiling 
>yMtlipti('. for transportation, na- 
tional d)-fi-ns<-. sports, and llio liiiiltl- 
ing and testing of tires and tlx' 
nianiifaclure of \val<'r[iroof fool- 
wear, all an- titled into the 27 iiiiii- 
utes of running lime of S/ienAi/i;: 
«>/ Kiihher. a\ailal>le to organiza- 
tions from the I nited States Kuli- 
JM-r Companv. I'uhlic Helalions De- 
partment. I2.'?(> .Vxeiiue of the \iiier- 
iras. Ni-H ^ ork 20. The onK charge 
is for shipping eosts. 

The production, which includes 
scenes of Far KasI plantations, fea- 
tures William llarrigaii. stage and 
s<-reen veteran. 

Leslie Roush Productions, of 
Mineola. L.I. and New ^ ork City, 
piodiired Sfifnkinii <>/ Ruhher. 

Chevrolet Division Releases 
Latest Soap-Box Derby Film 

♦ lli'w tlii.u.-aiul- of Miiuiiteers 
pitch in to project the youth pro- 
gram of the local and championship 
.Soap Box l)erl(\ races of molorless 
"motorcars" is the storv of Many 
Hands, just released h\ the Che\ - 
rolet Motor Division of General 
Motors. 

The stage for the film was .set in 
f)wenshoro. Kv.. he<ause there last 
vear husinessmen and union labor 
built a track simulating Derbx 
Downs of Akron. Ohio, where the 
finals were held. W. G. Power. 
(Chevrolet advertising manager and 
executive director of the Derby, was 
among the speakers at the picture's 
premiere in Owensiioro. 

Labor Union and Community 
Is Illinois U. Slidefilm Theme 

♦ The cause of the labor union has 
been presented in films from varv- 
ing viewpoints and b\ a number of 
methods, sometimes with a chip on 
the shoulder and bristling denunci- 
ations of capital. Not so in I'lihlir 
Relations for Lalxir. -Kl-frame slide- 
film produced bv the Lmvkiisit^ 
OK Illinois Institute of Labor and 
Indu.strial lielations. 

Instead of a sound recording, 
lecture notes are provided for ap- 
plication of the general principles 
to the sj)eciflc labor grou(> s<-eiiig 
the film. 

The authors. Dorothy Dowell and 
Marguerite Keswick, take up the 
discussion frame bv frame, from 
the need of organization, why the 
unions seek the support of other 
groups, and how llit- union, with 
that support, can help build a better 
community. 

For furthi-r information write 
the Institute, at 7(>4 South Sixth 
Street, Champaign. III. 



ffi fhe^A 




NEWS ABOUT FILMS AND PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 



Here's Provocative Title on How 
To Gel That New Wardrobe 

♦ A priiMicaliM- title wins the first 
round of interest in a him prciduc- 
lion, and in Dressinf: U ell Is A 
(,ame the Household Finance 
CoRi'OR.\TlON comes out with a 
punch. The IK-minute fdmstrip is 
based on the booklet "Moncx Man 
agement ^ our Clothing Dnilar 
and supplants the picture What 
Shall I If ear y The accompanying 
lecture is illustrated with each 
frame. The fllni is available on free 
loan for one week (allow three 
weeks in booking) bv writing the 
Consumer Education Department. 
Household Finance Corporation. 
909 No. Michigan .Ave.. Chicago 
IL III. 

Another new Household Finance 
Corporation release is Budgelinji 
for Better Living, filmstrip lecture 



based on ".Money Management 
Your Budget" and succeeding Man- 
Ujiinji the Fatnily Income. The leu- 
lure is read b\ the group leader or 
teacher as the film is projnlcd. 
The running time of the new sub- 
ject is .'id minutes. 

Point in Point-of-Purchase Ads 

♦ I'oiiitofpuri liasi- iiilMTtising as 
a stimulus to impulse buving. ex- 
emplified by outstanding displav 
advertisements and fortified bv the 
direct cooperation of representa- 
tives of several large companies in 
|>roduction of the film, is pointed 
up in Eye Catchers Are Sales Catch- 
ers, 15-minute sound and color 
slidefilm of the Point of Purcma.sf. 
Advertising Institute. For free 
loan of the production, particularlv 
applicable to sales meetings, ad- 
drc.-is J. Kingslev Gould. Executive 




Sprightly Film Opener 
for "Your Hit Porade" 







rlf^f^nTNT 



W«'d be pl«oied fo screen 
lofne of our loteil produc- 
tions for rou. No obi (got Ion. 



NiW YOIK • CHICAGO 
HOUYWOOO 



SLIDEFILMS • MOTION PICTURES 
TELEVISION COMMERCIALS 



Secretary. Point of Purchase Ad- 
vertising Institute. 16 Y.. 4.'ird St., 
New Y (irk ('itv 17. 

Aerial Phologrophy in Beelond 
Color Job on Outstate Michigan 

* .\crial shot-, and a .sequence on 
w inter sports figured in the two 
and a half months of camera work 

\\\ the C||.\HLES D. BeELAND CoM- 

I'ANV of Atlanta. Ga.. in completing 
a half-hour sound and color film. 
Meet Outstate Michigan, for the 
Consumers Power Co.mpany or 
Jackson. The story of the indus- 
tries, agriculture and recreational 
offerings of the state is being re- 
leased to civic, industrial and edu- 
cational organizations. 

Beeland recently made a series 
of theatrical films for the Brock 
Candy Company and commercials 
for Brock. Cabin Crafts. McLean 
I rucking Company and the Norris 
Candy Company's Variety Box, 

Rail Association's Two Latest 
Available at Princeton Center 

* for the seventh year in a row the 
Association of American Rail- 
KOADs has picked The Princeton 
Film Center to distribute its docu- 
mentary motion pictures. The two 
newest titles are On the Track and 
// histle in the .\ight. 

The place of the railroads in t<i 
da\ s international commotion is 
the subject of On the Track. 20- 
minute color film which takes them 
from cradle to streamliner. 

In IT hislle in the i\ight. 18 min- 
ute I6nim version of one of the new- 
releases in the This Is .\merica 
series, is told a behind-the-s<-enes 
drama of the railroad vards. cars, 
control towers and their people. 

Both productions are available 
on free loan, except transportation 
charges, by addressing The Prince- 
Ion Film Center, Inc.. Princeton 2. 
N. J. 

Theatre on Wheels Will Show 
Safety Film to Rail Workers 

* Every traveler has wondered 
about the mortalit) rate among 
track workiTs on railroads' right of 
«,i\. Whatever the t<dl mav be, 
the New York Central System, 
in cooperation with the National 
Safety Coi n( ii.. is determined to 
reiluce it. The Ceiilral's new 18- 
o'iiuili- lOiiim sound nim. Men of 
Maintenance, will be shown to all 

crews from a specially constructed 
safety car containing a pri:jeiiion 
room and auditorium. 



66 



l< I 



I \ Kss SCREEN \1 Vf. \ Zl \ K 






New Cooper's Sales Film Gives 
Practical Aid to Retail Personnel 
♦ f'raitical inethciHs i>f df\fl(>|)ii\f; 
I puteiitially vuluablc retail sales per- 
sonnel is the sulijett i>f a 2i-iiiiriute 
I sound motion |)i(ture. •/// / Can Dn. 
produced hy Vt ildiiig Hiclure Pro- 
ductions for Coopers, Inc.. leading 
manufacturer of men's underwear. 

Althou<;h concentrating )irimuril\ 
on modern methods of retailing 
men's underclothing, the film dram- 
atizes essential steps in selling 
which apply to ai\y retail business. 
Coopers, being aware of this fad. 
have arranged to make it available 
on a loan basis to all interested 
groups. 

All I Can Do is a dramatic pres- 
entation showing hoH a lierctoforc 
incompetent salesman is developed 
into a valuable clerk by teaching 
him the following formula for sales 
success: 1 — Get attention; 2 — 
Arouse interest: 3 — Build con\ ic- 
tion: 4- -Create desire: and .5 
Effect the close. These perhaps fa- 
miliar [H>ints have been revitalized 
with actual selling situations por- 
trayed in the film. 

Prints of this picture can be ob- 
tained on a loan basis, free of 
charge, by writing to the .Sales Pro- 
motion Department, Coopers. Inc.. 
Kenosha. Wisconsin. 

Outdoor Advertising's Story 

* Ihc story behind outdoor ad\<-r- 
lising is being brought home to the 
public by showings of Yvitr Out- 
door Neif^hbor to community social 
and civic groups bv members of the 

OtTDOOR AnVKKTISIM. AsSfX.I -VTION 
or AMKKirA. The sound slidehlm 
was made by Sarra. Inc.. after 
months of |)lanning. 

Supervisory Slidefilm Title Oof 

* first -oiind siidelilm i ompleted 
in a .Successful Supervision Series 
from the Variktv Mkik iiwdiskk 
Pi BI.ICATKiNs' Visual Training l)i- 
X ision is Hou< to Give an Employe 
tin Order and Gel It Done. Store 



managers, assistants and salesgirls 
enact the situations in the super- 
visor-employe relationship ^eri^•s. 
applicable to au\ business or in- 
dustry. The address is V)2 l^'xinp- 
lon \\v.. New York Ui. 

Instrument Society Production 
Describes Principles of Control 

* The dillicult subject of the funda- 
mentals of control is put to the test 
of film visualization in l'riniii>le.\ 
III Automatir Control, sponsored bv 

the Insthi mknt S(m iktv (»k Amkk- 
U\. with Ct. V. Akins as the in- 
structor. The demonstrator-lecturer 
takes a typical industrial process. 
points out the original tni.stakes in 
designing and goes on to explain 
the workings of control instruments. 
I he film has special values for 
foreman training and for instru- 
ment engineers. 

The 16nmi sound and color mo- 
tion picture, which runs .S5 min- 
utes, is on free loan to IS.\ sections 
and schools. S.S a showing to other 
organizations. Sill to companies. 
The purchase price is 85(H1. The 
address of the association's national 
odice is 921 Ridge .Ave.. Pittsburgh 
12. Pa. 

Animal Skin to Asphalt Roof 

* I' roiii animal »kiii~ and pitch, 
soaked textiles to the modern as- 
phalt roof, the struggle of man to 
provide his family with shelter 
against the elements is mirroreil in 
riie Outside Story. maAv with llollv- 
wood talent by the IMiKn Statks 
(Iyi'SIM Company. The production, 
for free showings through local 
dealers, was a vear in the making. 

VA Puts Epilepsy on Screen 

* Patients and other indivi<luals 
portrav themselves, with two fea- 
tured stage and screen actors. John 
.McLiam and Halph Browne, in 
.SV/;ure, -Mt-minule \eteraiis .\dmin- 
islralion film on epilepsy an<l its 
social impact and medical treat- 
ment. The camera work was done 
at the locales in the script. 



Training Slidefilms 

That get result-, while saving 
you lime, saving vou money. 
May we s<T€M"n some of our 
reient proiluclion« for vou? 

Berlet Anderson Marlin 

549 WESt «ANDOlPH SI 
CHICAGO «, IlllNOIS 



Elliot Pew Named 
Unifilms Sales Heed 

♦ Kl.l.loT PK«. former 
district sales manager 
for Colonial Airlines, 
ha? joined Imfilms, 
Inc. of New York, as 
vice-president in charge 
of sales and distribution. 
Mr. Pew will nls<« In- 
in charge of I nifilnis' 
Philadelphia sound stage 
and priMluclion farili- 
lii-«. 

Vice President Pew 
brings to I nifilms a rrc- 
f>rd of extcnsivp experi- 
ence in *nlr« and pro- 
duction held-. 



i A, 


1 

I'Al 1. I.KKTON 








D ATI K>. IIAK ION. 1)1 l<^ 1 INI^ 


X 


O > H « » It Nl- 


i >!' 


N 1 UN A JHtW I.ES 

Lk« II. & l'KK>lll<K\ 






i F,. 


KTCIIKK II. Itl» II \l(l>s 

J. W \l 1 Kll 1 IKOII'^MN 






i k, 


N^ M\ A 1 K II Mtlli 

ill 1 1 1 l( \ 1 II A II Y \ \ 






: V 

, 1 <>l N<. A 1(1 III! \M 








M Mtl) W IIKKI (M K 








Havr cnjovrd our rollalioriiliun in ihr | 


iro<i 


ur. 




lion tif T\ romnirrrial- for vour arniiinl.. 1 


■ 


- Piiiil J. Fennel 1 Company 








1159 N HIGHIAND. MOLirWOOD • 


CI 


1637 




^ E 40TH, NEW YORK CITY • Ml 


9 


4268 



PROFITS ARE AUTOMATIC II 



with BRIDGAMATIC 



anybody can run it! 



This low co«( «ulo 
malic lilm proc«ms 
ing machin* doai 
th* job light on youi 
own pT«mis«s. Sav»a 
valuabl* tim«. pio 
Ivcia youi pr»cioua 

n««aiivM SpMds up BRIOGAHAIIC II 6B. posiliK iutt 910 ier 

your anlir* pioduc- 

lion rouiin* Sliaighl lEmra or l6/3Smia combinallon aodal*. 

poailiv*. rvvaisal or color modcla 

Develop and dry icady lor ahowtng your own apot nawaiw 

•vania occur TV Slaliona. amall laba . aducallonal inantutiona. 

•r*. miciolilroaia hava pxovan BRIDGAMATIC in Iha liald lot ai 

Complalaly aall conlainad with palanlad ovardiiva air aqi 
in drybox and haallng alamenla. plaaUc linad alaal tanka No 
laquitad loi op«taling atlach lubbar hoc* and plug in 

BRIDGAMATIC JR. tits in my corner SI 000 plus tji 



/ 



r 




liiir. SI12S lie \u 
II 

nagaUv* or 



>l aam* day 
dim produc 
pvaial yeaia 
•geaa. txiill 
apacul akill 



corn AI I ^^^ Porlobi* Comafo Dolly with two twivcl < ^ a ncn 
OrLUIAL. „ot» WORTH $350 Only o law ol Ihii pnca \'*l 



AOINIt roa. A<«« A«iaaii*« . aiM SmI iM»a»» ■ »..aa««»»-« D» iiiaiii • Owm 

ftiaixi • fM>m> DdiiM • a»l<M lasa ilM • l« n « n .«» t,a<k<M«.| ••<•'«•'> • Itmt 
"—*>*— • »-iia Wlf^HmStn • C*>««M llWt • lnai >«'*••« • M«llnt« r<l>wn • 

t>ai>»«a 

•i»*f .»»^i aw-laai* m» •••• aai» f *i — *«.f« #«# av*a>la. 

S. 0. S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP. 602 ^..]Zl. ny „ 



NUMBER 2 



\ < H I M K I : 



I '» .j 1 



67 




BUSINESS SCREEN EXECUTIVE 



I'ai L K. KniioiT 
directs Si E "special pro/eels" 



Kohout Assists S.V.E.'s Garvey 

♦ I'ai I. K. Konoi t, as assistant to 
I'residfiit William H. Garvey, Jr., 
of tilt- SociKTY KOR Visual Educa- 
tion. Inc.. will he in charge of 
sales of all industrial and special 
priHluclion equipment and material 
as well as projects. Kohout was 
merchandising manager and sales 
administration manager for the 
Jelke di\isiiiii nf I^ver Brothers 
Compaii\ . 

Wortman Chief of Advertising 
And Sales of Audio & Video 

♦ Lkon a. Woktman. named di- 
rector of advertising and sales pro- 
motion of the Audio & Video 
Products Corporation, takes over 
his new duties as part of an expan- 
sion program of the company . 
Starting as the distributor of Am- 
pex Tape Recorders, the corpora- 
tion now heads several subsidiary 
operations, including the Audio- 
Video Recording Company. Inc.. 
tape and disc- recording service: 
and A-V Tape Libraries. Inc.. 
manufacturing and sales organiza- 
tion of music programs on \ii" 
magnetic tape. 

The parent company also distrib- 
utes the products of Altec-Lansing. 
Cinema Engineering. Fairchild. 
I^nsing .'signature. Mcintosh, Min- 
ncs<Jta .Mining and Manufacturing. 
and Pickering. 

Cramer OuMont Liaison Chief 

♦ War priiduction planning i> 
nothing new to Leonard F. Cram 
ER, vice president and director of 
Allen B. DlMont Lakoratories, 
Inc., named chief of the company V 
Government liaison department.' 
Du.Mont's defense mobilization a<- 
livities in World War II. and armed 
forces contract negotiations, wcr<- 
in Cramer's jurisiliction. 

Heads DuMont Electronics Sales 

♦ l.liuiN li. IliM K lia« liic-ii |,ri.- 
motcfl to sales manager of the elci- 
tronic parts division of the Allen 
M. DuMorit Laboraloric-s. Inc. 



U.S. Department of Interior 
Honors Louis F. Perry for Service 
♦ Louis F. Perry, supervi.sing en- 
gineer of the (Graphic Services Sec- 
tion of the Bi itEAi' (IF Mines in 
l'ill>l)urgli. Has presented with the 
|)i>lingiiished .Service Award and a 
gold medal, highest honors of the 
I'. S. Department of the Interior, at 
presentation ceremonies April .3 at 
the Central Kxpi'riment Station. 
Thomas II. Miller of Washington, 
acting director of the Bureau of 
Mines, iiflicialed on behalf of Secre- 
tary nf llie Interior Oscar L.'Chap- 
man. 

Forty years ago I'errv I'litered 
the service of the Bureau of Mines, 
where one of his current assign- 
ments is supervising the free non- 
theatrical film library of semi-tech- 



nical motion jiictures seen by twenty 
million persons a year. The .selec- 
tion, indexing and safekeeping of 
more than 7.5.WM) ollicial Buri'au of 
Mines photographs is another of 
his duties. 

Fegen Joins Jam Handy in Ohio 

♦ HoHKKT \. I'ki.kn. lieu member 
of the sales and contact staff of 
The Jam Handy Orcanizxtion, is 
representing the company in Ohio. 

United World Promotes Gluck 

♦ AoiiMAN L. Glk.k, a theatre 
manager before he joined United 
World Films, and head of the 
television department the past year, 
has been advanced to a \ ice presi- 
dency and to the directorate of the 
nonlheatrical subsidiary of Univer- 
sal Pictures Company, Inc. 





Kenneth .M. Mason 
heads Kodak midwest division 



Kodak's Midwest Film Manager 

♦ Kenneth .M. Mason is manager 
of KasT-Man Kodak's new midwest 
division for its motion picture film 
department, and has offices at 137 
N. Wabash a\cnue. Chicago 2, III. 

The midwest division embraces 
Colorado. Michigan. North and 
.South Dakota. .Nebraska. Kansas. 
.Minnesota. Iowa. Missouri. Wis- 
consin. Illinois. Indiana and parts 
of four other states. The midwest 
and a southern division were de- 
cided upon last year to improve 
coverage and service. 

Engel on N.P.A. Committee 

♦ Following llie preceilent of the 
late President Maurice Goldberg of 
the GoldE Manufacturing Com- 
pany, who served the Government 
in the last war as a member of the 
W ar Production Board of the ,35mm 
.Motion Picture .\dvisory Commit- 
tee, Sales Manager H. Bob Encel 
has been appointed to the 35mni 
Motion Picture Equipment Industry 
('ommittee formed bv the National 
Production .Authority. 

The committee, which is to report 
soon, is working on plans to main- 
tain a normal economy for the in- 
(luslrx in the period of demands 
on basic materials for preparedness 
(irnduction. 

Bosustow Thanks Canada's NFB 

♦ .Stephen Bo.sustow, president of 
I nited Productions of .America, 
w hose Gerald McBoinji lioini: has 
just won an "Oscar" of the Acad- 
emy of Motion Picture Arts and Sci- 
ences as the l»'st <arloon of I'J.iO, 
recently complimented the .NATIONAL 
Film Board of Canada for having 
been "a constant inspiration to us 
since we bepan |>ro(lucing our own 
I arloons." Bosustow singled out 
NFB(!"s Iff ill Arf to Kffj). pro- 
duced for the Canadian Department 
of National Health and Welfare aii<l 
w inner of first prize in the children's 
M-ction at last year's Venice Inter- 
national Film Festival. 



68 



BISINK.>^S SCREEN M .A f; A / I N E 




Jamks K. l.A.MUtK 
al Cincinnati for M ildin^ 



J 



LoMorr Is Cincinnati Manoger for 
Wilding Picture Productions, Inc. 

♦ Jamks E. LaMark. mow Ciiuiii- 
! nati hranch manager of Wilding 
' PicTiKK Prodi CTIONS. was assist- 
ant vice president of the I'arker 
Pen Company and has been identi- 
fied with the Southern Ohio i-oni- 
mereial film field for years. 

Pathescope Names McLaughlin 
Television Account Executive 

♦ Jack McLaughlin, former!) 
with Ketnon \ Kikhardt and with 

'■ Loueks i. Noriing ."^tudios. has heen 
named account executive in the 
Television Department of Patije- 
scoi'K Prodi CTIONS. 

I Schlake Heads Church A-V 

I ♦ MeLVIN F. ScHI^KE of St. I.ouis. 
head of Conrordia Pii li I i sh i tij: 
Houses film department, has iieeii 
named exeiuti\e director for au- 
dio-visual aids of the Mi-*souri 
Synod Lutheran Church. 

Golan Succeeds Kodak's Ireland 

♦ Joseph C. tioi.AN has sui<eeded 
Henr\ T. Ireland, retired, in the 
superintendency of the cine and 
shi-el film division nf Kvstmvn's 
Kodak I'urk |iluiil. 



PR Corporation Introduces Portable 
Slide Viewer for Field Sales Use 
♦ The I'oKT-A-VIEW. a new portahte 
slide viewer, has heen announced 
by the FK (IoRI'oRation in New 
York. Kquip|>cd with an automatic 
changer. •!■'•_■ x projection svstem 
and du\ light screen, the viewer is 
contained in a plastic case measur- 
ing .3 X 6 X 10' :; inches. 

The Port-a-view weighs four 
pounds and can be carried in a 
shoulder strap case. It is quickly 
ready for action, automatically 
feeds .% sliiles and can sttire up to 
72. plugs intii aii\ AC cir 1)(! out- 
let. 

Lawrence R. KiNk. KK's Presi- 
dent, is aiming the Port-a-view at 
merchandising men. "Business more 
and more has been turning to color 
slides to sell products, inslallatiotis 
and services." Fink pointed out. 
"but up to now. this trend has been 
hampered by the fact that a simple, 
portable mechanism for showing 
slides has not heen available. With 
the Port-a-view. slide showing is 
n<i longer a project — it's as casual 
as showing a plioto album." 

The Port-a-view "s optical s\stem 
includes ground and polished con- 
densers, fully color corrected f 3..3, 
50mm coated lens and a front sur- 
faced Chrolumirium reflecting mir- 
ror. Becausi' of the short foial dis- 
tance, it takes a lamp of only 50 
watts to produce a bright picture. 

The electrical system has a s<'lf- 
contained 7 foot removable cord 
.set which fits inside the case when 
not in use. plugs into a receptacle 
underneath the lamphouse. The 
proje<;tor turns on automatically 
when the cover is opened. 

The Port-a-view was stvled and 
engine<"red bv industrial ilesigners 
l.ippini'olt & Margulies. Inc.. on a 
principle developed \i\ FICs chief 
engineer, Kobert liarth. Produc- 
tion on the unit now runs about 
UK) a day. Price is S4<).')5. bather 
carrying cas«" is extra. 



In Seattle — 

• Full production facilities with 
licensed • • • 

• Western Electric Magnetic film 
recording. 

• 16mm stock shots available In 
commercial and regular Koda- 
chrome. 52,000 ft. of Pacific 
Northv»est scenery and industries. 

RARIG MOTION PICTURE CO. 

5514 University Way— KEnwood 7400 
Seattle 5, Washington 



U. S. Copyright OfRce 
Lists 50,000 Titles 
* .'>O.INNI inoliiin pic- 
luri-s registered in the 
li. S. Copyright Oilier 
brtwrrn Jul> I. 1<>I2 
anil l).tend.er M. \')V) 
are s<hedul>'d ■■■ npi>enr 
in a cataloging projni 
nnderlakeii b\ the Li- 
brnrv of Congriiw. for 
printing l»eforr the end 
of this year. 

\ complete litlr index 
phi« full ph\»ii'al deliiiU 
on iniliviilujl produc- 
tions will Im- proviiled 
on all toityri^hlni male- 
rial known to iIm- offiir. 





VARIABLE SPEED MOTOR 

with TACHOMETER 



for 

CINE SPECIAL CAMERA 
AND MAURER CAMERA 

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lnteTchat$geahle Motors: 
12 Voll DC variobi* Sp»d S-64 

Fromet. 
115 Voll AC 60 Cytle. Synthronoui 

Molor, SingI* Phat«. 
220 Voll AC 60 Cycl*. 3 Phoj». Syn- 

chronoui Molor. 







NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT.iNC. 



20 West 22nd Street 



New York 10. N. Y. 



ffoiecUfre^e''''^ 



YOUR FILM 



EVKRY (ilm uicr nc«d» efficient 
tloraicc and filinx >pjicc. Nrumadc't 
prjitical. *pctnill> dcMitnrd Meel 
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nxximum protection for your film. 
All model* tome in olivr-grey 
ennmcl with p<)li«hcd cttrome han- 
dlr> jnd tiinjce*. 

Mod*! MM-ll»-|l'l»i>o'»^ VAm Ming 
cab>n«t. Indiwidwol r*«l ir*d«i pWt 
noil*' >nd«i. doo« koi o lo<k oi w«ll 
at thr»« point lotching d*v»c* 70^ ktgk. 
30" -id«. 16" d«p CAPACirr 40 - 
400 It 'Mil; 20 - 100 (I 'mil. K - 
1200 II rooli; 20 - 1600 ti fMli. 100 
Alailfrip com. Ulilify dro-»t i" ba«» 



l)\er Filii Model* lo < !«»•»» trom. but Neumadc cn«ine«r» 
are «%ailjhle Miihoui t>tili|ijiiion to aniM ytw with your 
puniiular re<|uiremenn »hcn ne«n«ir> 
Wril* lotiay (or Fr»« (ully illutltolvtl Catalog 0»pt IIS 



1916 



'jJpU^HliL' 



PRODUCTS CO«P 
330 W. 4an4 St.. N«w Tork U, N. Y. 



Nl M UK R 



\ (I I 1 M K 1 



• I :, 1 



69 




Till: ROA "Jl mob" lltnim soiiiul motion 
pifturr projector is 10 pounds lighter, 
more fomftaet. but maintains all its qual- 
ity features. 

Many Innovations in RCA "400" 
Junior and Senior Projectors 
* A smaller and liplilfr model of 
the RCA ■'4IK)" Junior I611IMI isuund 
motion picture projector is a fea- 
ture of the 1051 line of projectors 
lirought out li\ the RCA Kngineer- 
ing Products Department. The new 
Junior is ten pounds lighter and 
easier to o|jerate than its prede- 
cessor. 

Improvements in the RCA "400" 
."Senior assure helter reproduction 
and facilitate operation. 

Both models are availahle in the 
easily portable single-case arrange- 
ment or in the more powerful and 
heavier double-ca.«e design. Six dif- 
ferent cond>inalions are offered with 
wall-lype. cal)inet-l\ pe and re-cn- 
Irant speakers as each of the basic 
models can be had with single-case, 
double-case or with externallv 
mounted speakers. 

There is a new type of housing 
for greater accessibility: magne- 
sium castings and streamline case 
reduce the overall weight. The pro- 
jectors have a blue-green hammer- 
tone finish, and both |)rojeilors and 
speakers are in cordoha gra\ fabri- 
coid coverejl metal and wund cases. 

F-ngineering features include a 
-imple shuttle intermittent control 
for adju.sting claw travel. The "the- 
atrical lyf>e" framing mechanism 
provides positive and accurate posi- 
tioning of ihe film in ihe pale with- 
out disturbing the aperture plate. 
The all AC motor drive eliminates 
the sparking contacts caused by 
the governor control of AC/DC uni- 
xersal type motors. Threading is 
simplified and rendered virtually 
foolproof. an<l it is not necessarv to 
change bells or reels for rewinding. 

A four-stage amplifier in the 

100" Senior model delivers a full 

lO-walt output at less than .5 (ht 

cent distortion throughout the 16mni 

recording range. For Iwlter regu- 



M ^^©DdOCI 



AUDIO-VISUAL PROJECTION EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES 





latiiMi of output there is a priiiiarx 
iriMTse feedback circuit, plus high- 
cr-frc(pien(\ power supph for the 
sound lamp. The signal-to-noise 
ratio is improved. 

riic liglitvicight Junior " l((l)" pro- 
jectors have a higli-<|ualil\ 7-wall 
transformerless amplifier, with am- 
pli- niiiput for audiences up to 500 
persons. A more powerful ampli- 
fier in a separate case ma\ be used 
for larger auditoriums. 

.New design of speakers for both 
models. lO-inch for the .Seniors and 
.'!-inch for the Juniors, makes for 
better freijuency response and sensi- 
ti\ity. 

The new equipments have fast 
tuo-inch f/1.6 coated projection 



lenses. 750-walt lamps; spare reels 
and other accessories, and all op- 
erate from a UM) to 125-volt, 60- 
cycle, AC single-phase power source. 

Screen Scriber Distribution 
Through Visual Training Aids 

♦ rill- S( I(i;k\ Si mm u. mw over- 
head projector of Hardwell and 
McAlister. is being distributed by 
Visual Training Aids. 180 W. 
Randolph St.. Chicago. III. 

The seven-pound projector is 
compact, easily |)cirtaliie. and pro- 
jects a 3'.i X 4 transparencv for 
small office and aiidilnriiirn show- 
ings. 

Demonstrations can be arranged 
in the eastern area served h\ this 
distributor. 



Lrroducers of QJiae 

1 1 Lotion [Pictures 

Quince igi6 

DE FRENES 
COMPANY 

1909 BUTTONWOOD STREET 
PHILA. 30, PA. RIttenhouse 6-1686 



35MM • 16MM 
COLOR • B & W 




DeVry Projectors to Militory 
On $5,000,000 in Contracts 
♦ JAN (joint Army-Navy I motion 
picture sound projectors, created 
|i\ the DeVrv Corporation to speci- 
fications of the .Armed Forces for 
use in training and morale-build- 
ing, are being con.«tructed by the 
company to the tune of .S5.0(X),000 
in contracts. 

Noting that advancements in 
e(]ui|)ment manufacture now make 
the showing of motion pictures 
practicable on the deck of a speed- 
ing destroyer or in a steaming 
jungle. President William C. DeVry 
said the new units, to be used in 
conjunction with the long-range uni- 
fication |)rograni started b\ the 
Armed Forces in 10-15. will supplant 
other sound equipment. 

The manufacturer pointed to re- 
search findings from the last war 
that audio-visual education helped 
personnel "learn -iO per cent faster 
and helped them retain what they 
learnecl 5.5 per cent longer." and 
added that ranking officers called 
motion piitures second only to let- 
ters from home as best morale 
builder, lie i|uoled a medical officer 
as saying "one good movie in a 
Rurma jungle was worth more than 
a thousand aspirin tablets." 

Hartwig Sells "Shopper Stopper" 
♦ Kxrlusixe sales handling of Tilt; 
IUhwai.I) CdMI'ANV's Shopper 
Stopper automatic strip lilm pro- 
jector display unit in the Chicago 
area has been placed with Hartwig 
Displays. Ill «. Ja.kson Blvd., 
and John M. Sheviak will be in 
charge of all equipment sales for 
Hartwig in Chicago. .Sheviak was 
with ihi- Admatic Projector Co. , 



70 



B I S I .\ K .>; S >i C R E E N M A <; A Z I N K 




>no»N ABO\£ rieuiitg the new Eauman 
Moiiet '2^, 16mm professional projeriur 
are 1 1, to rj John Flor\, Eastman Ktnhil. 
Company's nontheatriral film ailtisor. 
and Chrsler A. Liniistrom, llhirf. Motion 
Picture Service, I .S. Department ol 
Agriculture. 

Government Men See Kodak's 
Heavy Duty 16mm Projector 
* Eastman Kodak's iii'u liea%>-(lul\ 
16mm projector. Model 25. designed 
for theater quality presentation of 
motion pictures in auditoriums to 
large groups, drew special atleri- 
tion from representatixes of the 
Armed Forces and other Govern- 
ment agencies at introductory dem- 
onstrations in Washington. I). C. 
The ne« e(|uipnieMt is also lieing 
shown to studio executi\es. 

Besides increased screen illuiiii- 
nation. advantages cited for the 
new equipment include greater dur- 
ability and (|uiet operation l>v em- 
ploying two independent >et inter- 
locked assemblies: the inteniiitteiil 
assendily and the shutter-sprocket 
system, driven by separate syn- 
chronous motors. There are indi- 
vidual motors also for the blower, 
take-up. and rewind. The luinp- 
hous«' is one structure, as i» the in- 
termittent system. Thus the ten ma- 
jor components of the projector 
may be removed individually for 
servicing. While intended for per- 
manent installation, ihi- iirojeiior 
can be disassembled in three pari-, 
each with hundholds. 

-An intermittent sprocket i- us<-(l. 
as in ."ISmm standard practice. An 
eight-frame sprocket driven bv an 
accelerated geneva star [irovide- 
positive and accurate transport. 

A SCRIPT SERVICE 



The two - interruptions - |H-r-frame 
shutter has (A)' , transmission. 

A new large-diameter l.umenized 
Kodak Projection l.ens is offered in 
a choice of focal lengths of 2. 2' i. 
2''U and 3 inches. All have f/l..S 
aperture and rare-element glass. 

A dual lampliouse in the tung- 
sten model permits putting a »land- 
h\ lamp into position with a turn 
of a switch. There is a new base- 
up lamp for greater precision of 
tilunient location and improved 
light maintenance. 

For belter signal-to-noise ratio a 
two-stage prc-amplitier is integral 
«ith the photo-cell and feeds into 
a separate main amplifier. (The 
amplifier system and speaker are 
made by the Altec-I^nsing Cor- 
poration. I Flutter is reduced to 
less than 0.2 per i ent rms an<l in- 
tcrmodulation distortion to .5 |>er 
cent, including sianning Iw-am and 
amplifiers. 

The controls are in a lighted 
panel in the projector pedestal. 
There is a switch for phonngraph 
or microphone input. The projec- 
tion mechanism is served by a 
four-power switch, and two knobs 
outside the projection head take 
lare of focusing and framing. For 
small audience a 60.SI5 Mice s|M-ak- 
er is standard equipment, an 8(K) 
Altec for large groups. 

The Government and industr\ 
representatives also saw in action 
the Kastman Television Recording 
Camera. Model II. for film record- 
ing of picture or picture and sound 
directly from oscilloscope or kine- 
scope monitoring equipment. Dis- 
played also were the 16mni Cine 
Kodak .'^iM'i'ial 1! Camern. Kodak 
Cine Kktar Ix'nses, and the I6inm 
high s|)eed camera for making mo- 
tion pictures at up to .S.(XX) frames 
a second. 

S.V.E. Increases Lamp Wattage 
♦ I^inqis of .'{(Xl-watts have sup- 
planted the 2lKI-Huttage in all Sky- 
line .Model "B" projectors without 
price increase, on new order*, the 
SnclKTV fOR \'lsl \l. Fin « *TU>N, 
Inc.. announci~t. 




Specializing in a creative 
approach to motion pictures. Production-wise 
shooting scripts and narrations on which spon- 
sors and producers can depend. 

.SID A HK I, — .s(. in I' l.s 

1(30 JIFFEISON PlACf. N W • WASHINGTON 6, C ■ NATIONAl 1014 



At a NEW ADDRESS... 

in Modern New Studios 
with MORE Capacity 

Film-wits creative planning 
PRODUCTION-WISE SCRIPTS 
Imaginative direction 
EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHY 
Adequate studios and sound stages 
HIGH FIDELITY RCA SOUND 
Expert art work and animation 
COMPLETE LABORATORY SERVICE 



. . . ALL coordinoled in one orgonizotion 
that can solve your commerciol and televijjon 
film problems with experience gained from 
o quarter-century of professional film production. 

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED NEAR LOOP 

CHICAGO FILM STUDIOS 

ol CHJCAGO fUM tABO«AIO«Y, INC 

56 tAST SUPERIOR STREET, CHICAGO 11 

PHONE WMITEHAU 4 6971 





S^xSyndtronous 
v^ Recording 

WITH YOUR PRESENT TAPE RECORDER 



Here's good nc»»l The new Fiir- 
child Control Track (icncr jtor miitrt 
pt«»iblc piciurr »vn<hronou» uiuntl- 
track rrcordin): wiili anv tapr re- 
corder vkiih rc\p<>n\c pxvd to MKC'. 
Hcrc'i t)o» ! Thi« new Fainhild 
intirumrnt tuprrimp>>trt a hiRtj (re- 
qurno Mjjnal on maKnclu tape 
timultancoiitly with ttir viund iraik. 
Thu tj^nal iKComrt the tape tpcrd 
control when pla>cd hack on a 
Fairihild PicS>nc Tape Recorder. 
No eitra head« or miKlification« to 
pre»entlv owned tape recorderi are 
rec^uifrJ 

WRITE FOR FULL 
ENGINEERING DATA TODAY 




Thii (omp^ft mmit toatfi im ^ %mMl 
i^drrymg (Jte — /or om-t^t^itom u9'k 
— itmJ m^y hr rrmoteJ for 'jtk 
mommttmK 




n4TH STIIIT AND 7TH AVINUI 



HITISTONI. L. 1., N. T. 



Nr M n F H 2 • \ o I I M K I : • i ')3 1 



71 




l.hllN \KI> K. ^ ODKU 

joins Jam Handy Organization 



Two from U.S. Navy Center 
Join Jam Handy Detroit Unit 

♦ Iwo new appuiiitir.- In tin- train- 
iiig devices staff of TiiK J.\M Handy 
Orcwization are Wii-FRKd K. Rut- 
I KDr.K and Lkonakd K. ^ Oder. 

Bolli are from the Special De- 
\i<es Center, I .S. Navy, at Port 
Washington. New York. Rutledge 
was director of utilization, mainte- 
nance and production planning. 
Y oder for four years was adminis- 
trative diriM'lor there. Rutledge. 
friiin Louisiana Stale College, Kent. 
Illinois and Uhio state universities, 
was a lieutenant commander in 
World War II. Yoder, a graduate 
of llaverford College, held the rank 
of commander. 

Parkes Resigns Apex Post 

♦ iliii,((i\inK I'vKKKs. executive 
vice president of the .Apex Film 
Corporation, resigned from that 
post on March 1st. For the past 
year he headed the Fastern Oflice 
of Kytex. Prior to that time he was 
vice president in charge of public 
relations of the .National Associa- 
tion of .Manufacturers. Parkes will 
announce his future plans soon. 

Levy Heads Bay State's TV 
Production and Sales Units 

♦ Milton L. Levy, television film 
writer and producer, who has been 
named vice president in charge of 
television and a director of Bay 
State Fil.m Prodi ltions. Inc., of 
Boston. Mass.. is supervising sales 
and sales promotion of the depart- 
ment as well as the creative pha.ses. 

Owens All-Scope Vice President 

♦ I he ilirnl'v viewpoint is brought 
directly into the staff of Ai.l-Si.opk 
Pl( TIRES, Inl., with the appoint- 
ment of C. 1). OwKNs as vice presi- 
dent after his se\enteen years with 
the California Prune and .Apricot 
Crowers Assoeiatir)n. the last dei . 
ade as sales promotion manager. 
I nder Owens" direction the com- 
pany is launching a program of in. 
Icgrating all possible u>*c* of ju 
< lients" films. 



O N THE PRODUC TION LINE 

m;\\s iw cbkmim; \M) tkchmcal .sti did plbsowkl 



Granducci Starling Sixth Year 
With Bigger Staff, More Space 

* Increased ollice space anil tin- :iil- 
dilioii of two more wrilcrs and 
another story board artist inaugurat- 
cil llic sixth Near of operation of 

S(RII'I'S By OKVKSTK CltANDUliCI. 

writing organi/.alion in Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

The growing recognition of liic 
value of this service of creati\c 
originalil\ and staff operation dc- 
pcndabililv in the interest of pro- 
ducers and sponsors is reflected by 
the fact that the organization has 
planned and written more than 215 
hims. for sixteen producers and 
nine sponsors, each a large user of 
industrial productions. The figures 
also emphasize the high percentage 
of repeat business. 



Films jiroduccd from (iranducci 
scripts show a nicril record of at 
least one national or inlernaliorial 
award in each of the five years of 
I lie lompany's operation. 

Salzburg Announces Formation of 
Cornell Film Productions, Inc. 
♦ Cornell Film Productions, 
Inc.. has been organized at 1501 
Broadway in New Y Urk to make 
business films. Headed \<\ MlI.TON 
J. Salzhlrc, recent producer of 
I'allern For Survival, Cornell is now 
at work on a new film concerned 
with defense of industrial jilants. 
Tarpel. USA. 

Herman Boxer, recentiv writer- 
director of films for .Santa Fe Bail- 
road. American Steel Foundries 
and the Budd Company, is in 
charge of production. 



CONVENIENT EVERYWHERE 

• 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 

P«ertesi Film Proc. Corp- 

De Luxe Laboroloriet 

Pothe Loborotoriei 

Movielab Film Labs. 

Fordel Film Labs. 

Cineque Colorfilm Lobi. 

FT. LEE, N. J. 

Consolidated Film Indi. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Byron, Inc. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Chicago Film Lob, 

Crescent Film Labs. 

Ideal Picture Corp. 

Wilding Picture Prods. 

OAK PARK, ILL. 

Atlas Film Corp. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

Jam Hondy Organization 

ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Reid H, Roy Film Inds. 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

The Calvin Company 

CLEVELAND, O. 

Motion Picture Prods, 

DAYTON, O. 

Wright-Patterson A. F. B, 

ATLANTA, GA. 

The Distributor's Group 
DALLAS, TEXAS 

Southwest Soundfilms 



fOK riLM CONSenVATION 



Pe. 



EERLESS 

FILM TREATMENT 




Always needed. 
Vital now 



HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 

Peerless Film Proc. Corp. 

Acme Film Labi. 

Columbio Picturei lab. 

Consolidated Film Indi. 

Pothe laborotoriet 

Telefilm, Inc. 

BURBANK, CALIF. 

Cinecolor Corporation 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

W, E. Hockey 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Sowyef's, Inc. 

TORONTO, CANADA 

Peerleis Laboratories 

LONDON, ENGLAND 

Peerless Film Proceuing Ltd 

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM 

Laborcine 

BERNE, SWITZERLAND 

Sch.ari Filmlechnik 

ROME, ITALY 

Continentolcine 

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA 

Moywofd C Pofish 



PEERLESS 



—treated prints are: 



moisiure-stabiUzed— 
not 'green" or brittle 

toughened— 

to resist scratches and wear 

/ubricotec/— 

to ease projection 



PEERLESS 



— treated prints 



start ofF right and keep 
their good condition longer. 



fi 



Write for frtt 
literaturt 



EERLESS 



FILM PROCESSING CORPORATION 

16S WEST 46TH STREET. NEW YORK 19, N Y 
959 SEWARO STREET, HOllYWOOO 38, CAIIF 




W ILI 111 IP K. Itl TLKDGK 

!\avy expert to Jam Handy 



17 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN SAFEGUARDING FILM 



♦ Canada's growing business and 
factual film industry was reflected 
in these news events of the past 
iiiorith : 

New Sovereign Film Studios 
Launching Television Program 

♦ \\ illi acijuisilion of the former 
Queeiisway Stu<lios near Toronto, 
the Sovereign Film Distributors, 
Ltd.. headed by Paul Nathanson. is 
undertaking an ambitious program 
of television production in Canada, 
as well as its other tvpes of films. 

The new division, Sovf.reic.v 
fiL.M Stldios. has as general man- 
ager Frank O'Byrne, formerly 
with Associated Screen News and 
Queensway Studios. 

.Sovereign Film Studios, which re- 
cently completed films for Imperial 
Oil, Ltd., Christie. Brown and Com- 
pany, and the World Council of 
Churches, is equipped to produce 
and print 16mm color films and to 
prepare TV productions, both live 
and film. 

.Sovereign Film Distributors re- 
leases 16nmi productions of Repub- 
lic Pictures. Columbia. Universal. 
RKO and Vi'alt Disney, and films 
niad<' by French and independent 
producers. 

J. A. Fraser Heads Crawley's 
New Branch Office in Montreal 

♦ .\ niw branch ollice of Crawley 
films Limited opened April 1st in 
.Montreal, with screening facilities 
and shooting stage as well as office 
space, riie Montreal manager is J. 
.Masdair Fraser. active in film pro- 
duction in Canada for ten years. 

Mr. Fraser. who in I'i'M) organ- 
ized the Motion Picture Section of 
Canadian Industries Limited, was 
a captain with the (ianadiaii .\rmy 
Film aiul Photo I nit in Kurope 
during the war. He founded his 
own production company four years 
ago. 

The new branch is in the offiies 
formcrU occupied by Fraser Films 
l.imilcil in ihe Penthouse. Dominion 
Square Building. Fraser Films' con- 
tracts are being taken over bv 
Crawlevs. 



BUSINESS SCREEN M A (; \ Z I N E 




K. S. l,lNDFOKS I left) cull- 
firalitlalfs I'eter Abrams, 
presiilenl of If illiium. Brown 
& Earle in I'hilailelohia. 



Bell & Howell Plaque »o Abrams 

^ ♦ \\l'l<..lii.tl tu |)„- 1{,.|| \ iiowrjl 
Quarter-Century Club by Vice Presi- 
dent K. S. I.indfors. nbo presented 
a plaque in rerngiiition of service. 
Phksiuknt Pktkk Ahkams of Wii.- 
UAMs, Bhow.n & Earle. Inc.. of 
Philadelphia represents the dealer 
company which, founded in I8K5. 
sold the first Bell & Howell motion 
picture projector in Pennsylvania. 
Abrams ha.s pioneered in the use of 
motion pictures in the fields of in- 
dustry, education and relipioii. 

Paper Cup Institute Offers 
Service on Disaster Feeding 
♦ Producers of defense truining 
and eduiational films that bear on 
the subje<'t of feeding under dis- 
aster conditions are invited by the 
fielil research division of The Paper 

Cl P AM) (^O.NTMNER InSTITIITK to 
avail themselves of the experience 
gained by mendiers of the Insti- 
tutes staff in the field. 

Institute representatives are aid- 
ing Civil Defense and Red Cross 
units in setting up programs for 
feeding workers and evacuees in 
the event of atomic bombing. 

Address the Paper (!up and Con- 
tainer Institute. .5.51 Fifth Avenui-. 
New York City. 



"Look to the Skies" Shows Value 
of Air Force Tactical Weapons 
♦ Willie John Ib.i I'ull,,, hopes, 
and {K-rhaps believes, that another 
world war can be kept awa\ from 
his Ameriia, he should know that 
if conlliit does come lieM belter 
look f<ir more than heaw bond>crs 
and inteniptor planes in a battle 
for air supremacy. In Look to the 
Skies, new 18-niinute sound film 
from the Department of the .\ir 
Idkce. due attention also is "iven 
to the tadical bombers, figliters, 
reconnai.ssance planes and trans- 
ports in support. 

Pilots of the Tactical ,\ir Com- 
mand describe the five kinds of 
combat missions and the new types 
of planes - the F-81 Ihunder Jet, 
the four-jet Tornado, the B-^15, 
.tnd the transports C-119 and (M21. 
Prints for general as well as high 
school age group showing mav be 
had on loan from an\ of these Air 
lone Area (iontnd Film Libraries: 
Olmsted AFB. Middletown. Pa.; 
Brookley AFB (Mobile area). Ala- 
bama: Hill AFB. Opden. Itah: 
Tinker AFB. Oklahoma Citv; M< - 
(;iellaiid \FB. Sacramento. Calif.; 
Keil\ AFB. .San Antonio. Texas; 
and Robins AFB (Warner Robins 
area I, Georgia. 

• • • 

A New Norman McLaren Picture 
"Stars and Stripes" Now Available 
♦ Norman McLaren's Slurs ami 
Slripes. band-draun 16mm <olor 
produ<tion with musical sound 
track ins<-ribed directly upim the 
film, with the artist's own chro- 
matic scale, is being ri-leas<-d bv 

lNTEKN\T|r)NAI. FlI.M BlREAl. G 
\. Michi;;an Ave.. Chicago 2. III. 
The previously ri-lea.-ed McLaren 
films. Fiddle dc Dec and Hen Hop. 
now may be had with it as a pack- 
age, the three on one reel, or indi- 
vidually. Singly. Stars and Slrifirs 
is purchasable at S2').7.S: the pack- 
age price is .?7.5. 



782 Commonwealth Ave. 
BOSTON. MASS. 

Phone: BEacon 2-5722 



WS 



"IHH.I ,^ W iinj) I'RllDI C I KiN 
VI nil \L\\ FM.I \M) |( (»N(»MV" 



N. Y. Cost Accountants 
Hold Film Program 
* Three fihiis oti »ork 
simplification to increas*- 
production and lower 
costs will be shown on 
May 1st at a !ip<-< iai 
program of the N. Y. 
chapter of the National 
AssiK'iation of Cost \i-- 
countants. The "houing^ 
will be held in the Na- 
tional ('ash Register au- 
ditorium. Michael A. C. 
Hume, chapiter dirrrlor 
of education, arranged 
the program shoMing the 
value of a-v media to 
the profewtion. 




THE OLDEST NAME 
IN AGRICULTURAL FILMS 



Production 
Distribution 



PEORIA 2, ILLINOIS 




"/ K •• iilial you ntian. Mr. Husby. uhen you say 
a I'arafon I'iclurv really rearhr% the niiilienre." 

Maybe this Is why five of fhc commerciol films fo win 

fop National awards in the past three years, were 

produced by 



Pariigonlj^JpiLlui/c5 

2540 Eastwood Avenue (y ftC. 

Evantton. Illinois • Phone DAvis 8-5900 



M MIIKR l 



\ Ol I M K 12 • I-j:, I 



T.I 




You Are Cordially Invited to Discuss 
Your Film Program With Us. 



Special production facilities 
for visual aids in — 



MEDICINE 

SURGERY 

PHYSICS 



BIOLOGY 

CHEMISTRY 

PSYCHOLOGY 



• Eipert technical staff 

• Live action and animation 

• Color and sound 

All films produced to meet highest 
scientific and technical standards 

For further details see 
listing in this issue. 



STURGIS-GRANT 
PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

314 EAST 46TH STREET 
NEW YORK 17, NEW YORK 



l()mnih()l)A(;HIU)\lE 
I'hINTINJi MASTERS 

• 

35mm B&W Negatives 

Enlarged from 16mm Originals 

• 

35mm Color Theatre Prints 

Enlarged From 

16mm Kodachrome Originals 



16mm-35mm Specialized 

LAIi sm VICES 

Special Effectt 

Dissolves • Montoges 

Wipes • Fadet • Zoomt 

Superimposurei 

Frame Sequence Alteration 



riLMEFFECTS 

OF HOLLYWOOD 

II S3 N. Highland Ave., Hollywood 3B, Calif. 
Hollywood 9-5*00 

FOR TV 

35n,n, Bi'rW «r CJor 3iLi 
K»aU€0d io Ktmnt 



"The (III PonI Story" 

(CONI'INIKK lltllM I>\(;k SIXTY-TMHKE ) 

llic giiiilaiu'i* of T. (!cil(>inan du Poiil. tlic fiftli 
[>n-si<lciil. Pii'rn- S. <lu Font carrifs the i>all 
lliroii}-!! \\ Drld War I. and lay.s the basis for 
llic iiiiprossivc growlli that follows. 

Irenee du Pont establishes the pre.senl organ- 
ization of the company and shepherds the dve- 
>liill> venture to ultimate success. I nder the 
present l.ainniot du Pont, the coinpanv begins 
fundainenlal research, which i)rings n\lon and 
oilier achiexenienis and carries to conunercial 
success such new products as rayon, cellophane 
and "Duco" lacquers. 

Carriks 1 I- ro Prksknt Recimk 

Waller .'^. (Carpenter. Jr.. ninth president, leads 
in carrving out the burden of the coin()anv s vast 
\\ orl<l War II effort. After initialing another 
great expansion after the conllict, he hands over 
the reins to Crawford H. Greenewalt, early in 
194«. 

The du Pont Story represents a major produc- 
tion efTort. with 22.S actors and actresses taking 
part. A total of 91 different sets was designed, 
built and erected at the studio. Many were 
replicas of places in Wihnington. such as the 
first ofTice building and the first home of E. 1. 
du Pont de Nemours. 

The paintings from the Carpenter and Greene- 
wait oflices were transported to Hollywood to 
create the proper atmosphere. When Carpenter 
saw the Hollywood duplication of his office he 
remarked he felt so at home that he thought he 
ought to go to work. 

In the heavy undertaking of casting, only 
those actors who closely resembled the indi- 
viduals they were to portray were selected. Car- 
penter. Greenewalt and members of the execu- 
tive committee play their own roles. 

The film was produced by Jack Chertok of 
the Apex Film Corporation. 

Technical Pekiection Is Evide.nt 
The du Pont Story is technical perfection-plus 
in every detail of production from the (juality 
of its Technicolor cinematography to the fine 
points of set construction previously noted. As 
biography in fact, it leaves little to be added to 
the saga of the du Ponts. As such it has written 
a chapter of its own in the history of business 
films. • 



W> Wi>li to Tli:ink 

THE FREEDOMS FOUNDATION 

For Awarrliiif; Third Prize lo 

AII«'gh«*i»y l.iiiJIuin Si****! Corporulion*^ 
Mniion Piriure 

"THE FIFTH FREEDOM" 

Produced By 

Mode-Art Pictures, Inc. 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



^^^N^^^ 




^CTIOV^*' 

FILMS 

that mold opinions 
—that get results 



ROBERT YARNALL RICHIE 
PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

9 West 61st Street 
New York 23, New York 

Motion Pictures for 
business and industry. 





"^"new 



\l 



HAS BEEN ADDED.^ 



/ 



We can show you 
a NEW production 
fechnique. 



THOS. J. BARBRE 

MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTIONS 

121S Eot» Virqiiiia Ave. 

Denver 9, Colorado 



74 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Eastman Kodak Reports Record 
Soles & Earnings For the Past Year 

♦ Bi>lh sales and earnings of the 
Eastman Kodak Company quick- 
stcpp«'d to Tfcord highs for the year 
195(1 aftiT marking time compara- 
tively in the early months. Chair- 
man Perle\ S. Wilcox and I'resi- 
dent Tliomas J. Margrave called it 
"ihe best financial year the com- 
pany ever had." with earnings 13.1 
per cent of sales in 1950 compared 
with 12.6 per cent the preceding 
year. 

Net sales were §461.389.980 for 
53 v*eeks ended Decemher 31. 1950. 
against .S3'>f..232.518 for 52 weeks 
ending December 25 the year 
earlier. The 1950 consolidated net 
earnings of S61. 858.957 were at 
$4.50 a share on the 13.664,350 
outstanding: the 1949 figures were 
S49.770.6')<.». or S3.80 on each of 
the 12.996.228 common shares. 

In the first 24 weeks of 1950. 
Wilcox and Hargrave niited. "total 
sales had increased very little over 
1949. While sales of sensitized 
films and papers were up somewhat, 
and sales of yarn, staple fiber and 
plastics were considerably greater, 
these gains were mostly offset by 
reduced sales of cameras, projectors, 
lenses ami ac( essuries. Buying of 
photographic goods during the first 
half of the year appeared to be 
mostly for <urrent requirements, 
undoubtedly influenced to some ex- 
tent by llii- expectation, current at 
the time, that there would be a re- 
duction in excise taxes on such 
goods. 

"With the advent i>f the Korean 
situation in June, there was an 
almost immediate increase in the 
demand for the company's prod- 
ucts. The prospect of more inflation 
and of possible restriction on pro- 
duction of civilian goods undoubt- 
edly stimulated buying, along with 
the fact that photographic sales 



normally increast- during the sum- 
mer months. 

"As a result, sales in the last 29 
weeks of 1950 increa.sed 29 [x-r i-ent 
over the last 28 wwks of 194'). and 
the total for the year was at a new 
high." 

The executives noted that despite 
considerable enlargement and im- 
provement of the physical |)lants 
in the five post-war years, "produc- 
tion of most photographic films 
during the last half of the year 
I 19501 and of acetate-rayon yarn 
and staple fiber and plastics 
throughout the year was virtually 
at capacity." 

Notable is the fact that commer- 
cial and professional photography 
accounted for the largest percentage 
sales volume by product group, 
supplanting amateur photography 
wliicli had been first in 1949. 

Thousand Pictures on First Aid 
In 19 Strips Offered by SVE 
♦ More than l.lHHt pictures, in 
nineteen filmstrips, tJiree of which 
are in color, are offered by the 
Society for Visual Education, 
Inc.. as a complete visual course in 
first aid. to suppli-ment the training 
methods used by medical practi- 
tioners and (jualified instructors. 
The announcement was precipitated 
bv the news that the American Red 
Cross had accepted a request from 
the .'\dminislralion to head the 
training of up to twenty millions of 
.Americans in first aid techniques. 
With running times varying from 
6 to 13 minutes, and recordings ti> 
operate on 33-1 3 r.p.m. turntables, 
the films cover a wealth of subjects 
ranging from an introductory look- 
si-e at the human body to types of 
injuries and wnunds. bandages, 
transportation, artificial respiration, 
fractures and treatment, insensibil- 
ity, and internal injuries. 

W rite the Society for Visual Kdu- 
cation. Inc.. 1345 Vt'. Diyersev 
I'arkway, Chicago 14. III., for addi- 
tional information as to 
litli-s an<l prices of the 
"^^^"^ productions. 



BERT JOHNSTON 
PRODUCTIONS, INC. 

8204 Blue Ash Road 
Cincinnati 36, Ohio 

SERVICES: Industrial motion pictures, 16nim 
color and sound. Sound slidefllms. 

FACILITIES: Mourer camera equipment, figure 
animation. Western Electric 4-chonnel mix- 
ing console; extensive costing files, sets; 
•diting, art, and script deportments. 



Flormon and Bobb 
Expands N. Y. Quarters 
* f l.llHM \N ^ lUiiM lias 
expanded its ipiarters at 
723 S'venth Avenue in 
New ^iirk City and this 
firm is now slocking a 
complete line of new and 
used I6n)ni and .35nim 
professional motion pic- 
ture production, labora- 
tory, and editing equip- 
ment for rental and •ale. 
.\ iletailed price liM is 
available on vuur letter- 
head request. 



ALWAYS 
AT YOUR 
SERVICE 



\ 



111 
111 



111 



^^ 



^.MS:. 



To the more than 600 clients we have served 
in the past year. Florez Incorporated is a 
seven-floor reservoir of skilled personnel and 
faultless specializin': in the communication of 
business itlens. Ferhap- we can help you. too. 




INCOIPOiAIEO 

FORMERLY VISUAL TRAINING CORPORATION 
Rl". BATKS STREET • DETROIT :6. MICHIGAN 

.'^(•rll/lL' /"op Manau''""''!! ^inrr ]931 



FIVE Sound Films on 

Industrial Organization 
and Management 

Once more, McGraw-Hill Text-Films pioneer a 
field long in need of visual explanation and in- 
terpretation. Each 16mm motion picture runs ten 
minutes and is accompanied by a follow-up 35mm 
silent filmstrip. The subjects listed below are those 
that claim the attention of business management 
daily. Why not let them help you solve some of 
your organizational problems now? These are the 
titles : 

1. Risk and Forccosllng 

2. Internal Organizolion 

3. Product Development 

4. Physical Facilities 

5. Materials Control 

For complete descriptions, send tor Bulletin BBS. 

McGraw-Hill Book Company 

Trxt-Filn} Dcpartnu-t\t 

330 W. 42nd St. New York 18 



N I' M H E R 2 • \ < I I I M 1^ I : • 1 ■> 5 1 



75 




Servinp the Soiithivesf area with 
an iiilef^raleil motion fiiclnre pro- 
duction service to supply every 
need of the sfionsor. 

GULF COAST FILMS, Inc. 

Oil & Gas Building 
Houston 2, Texas 

RobiTt Yarnall Richie, President 



YOU NEED 
We Provide 

Art • Ki'M-arili • Script • Cast • Sets 

Li)£lilin<: • Molion Fiitiire Pliolofiraphy 

Souinl on Film • Developing • Editing 

Printing • Shipping • Storage 



PANCHROMATIC 



3-COL()K PRODI CTION 



DISTKinniON NMIOWLLY 

in llu-aire!- • liy televi--ion 
or Movies, U.S.A. 




'^W'**^-- 



COMMERCE picryitES 



cleiv Orleans 
M\(;\ni,i\ -026 



Serving (he Soiilh 



COMPETENT AND EXPERIENCED PRODUCER.S 
LOCATED IN THIS GBOWINC MARKET AREA 

Till. KISINC IMl'OFn'ANCK of agric ul- 
liiral and iiiduf^lriai dcvflopiiieMl>;. with 
special emphasis on oil and textiles, in tin- 
South and Southwestern regions of the I . S. 
has given fresh impetus to the regional business 
film producers of this area. Kxperience is a pri- 
mar\ asset of the recognized jeaiicrs in Atlanta. 
New Orleans. Houston, and Dallas and the con- 
venience of their facilities has helped increase 
the regular use of the medium by industries in 
their own and neighboring states. 

Jamikson Film Co.. founded in 1916, is the 
oldest in years. A close second is the Strick- 
land Film Company of Atlanta, founded in 
1920. For more than a decade Charles D. Bee- 
land, founded in 19:^8. has also served Southern 
industry. Commerce Picture.s in New Orleans 
and .Sam Orleans in Knoxville. Tennessee are 
other experienced hands in the production of 
business motion pictures. 

Distinguished service to the oil industry is 
the record of ROBERT Yarnall Richie of New 
York and Houston. Texas, whose GuLF CoAST 
Films was the producer of Make No Mistake. 
winner of the recent National Committee on 
Films for Safety first-award for occupational 
safety motion pictures. The Geophysical Serv- 
ice. Inc. of Dallas. Texas, was the sponsor. 

This Production Yearbook issue of Business 
Screen reflects the scope and facilities of these 
producers who serve their region of the I . S. 
with ability and distinction. Because of their 
convenience and completeness they tend to in- 
crease the use of the film medium and extend 
its resultful service to industry. 



PRSA's Audio -Visual Program 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE S I X T Y - T H R E E I 

dation award, and Land of the Free, a Ross Roy 
sound slidefilm series in color depicting the 
meaning of the free enterprise system. 

One of the highlights of the afternoon was a 
panel composed of the producers of audio-visual 
aids, who answered many questions on costs, 
distribution and other aspects of the subject. 
The moderator was 0. H. Coelln. Jr., editor and 
publisher of Business Screen. Those partici- 
pating on the panel included George T. Becker. 
Vogue-Wright Studios. Mercer Francisco. Fran- 
ci.sco Films, George B. Finch, The Jam Handy 
Organization. Inc., Joseph G. Betzer, Sarra Inc.. 
George L. Schuyler, Wilding Picture Produc- 
tions. Inc.. Norman C. Lin(i(|uist. Atlas Film 
Corporation, and Dallas Jones. Dallas Jones 
Productions. 

Midwest manufacturers of equipment also ex- 
hibited their products, including Ampro, Bell 
& Howell, Dalite Screen, DeVry. Radiant Mfg. 
Corp.. and the Srwietv for Visual Kducation. 
Inc.. Robert Straub and Co.. Visual Training 
\ids. and OiK-radio Mfg. Co. 

Members of the clinic committee were Na- 
than E. Jacobs, chairman. O. H. Coelln. Robert 
B. Johnson. Charles B. Cory, R. P. Hogan, 
S. F. Austin. (). M. Beveridgc and R. P. Carey. 



Southwesfs Largest 

COMPLETE PRODUCTION 
FACILITIES 

Color— B & W 

35mm 16mm 

ir Ri'.A Sound System 
• .=S000 Sq. Ft. Sound Stage 
ir (ioiiiplete Lalioriitory 
ir S<'r\i('('s for Producers 
ir I6tiiiii Kodiicliroiiie Printing with 

individual srene-by-scene «-ol(ir 

corret'tioii 




QUALITY PRODUCTIONS 
For 35 Years 

JAMIESON FILM CO. 

3825 BRYAN ST. DALLAS. TEXAS 



MOST COMPLETE PRODUCING | 

AND PROCESSING FACILITIES ' 

IN THE SOUTH 



Sound Stage with ample lighting, Dol- 
lies, Maurer Comera, Maurer Sound 
Recording, Magnetic Film Recorder, 
35mm Cameras, 16 & 35 Developing 
Machines, Edge Numbering, Editing, 
Projection Rooms, Color, Black and 
White Printing, Densitometric and 
Sensifometric Controls. 

Strickland 
Film Company 

220 Pharr Road, N. E. 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Phone: Cherokee 5317 
ORGANIZED 1920 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE ^ 



Crews at Work in Middle East on U. S. Films 
for Department of State Overseas Program 



♦ Motiun piiture rr<-«s n-prc-i-nl- 
ing a half dozen American univer- 
silies and colleges are in the Mid- 
dle Kasl producing duiunientarv 
and educational motion pictures (or 
the I . S. Department of State, for 
use in the Government's informa- 
tion and educational exchange pro- 
gram. 

The unit was divided into two 
groups, overseas and stateside, the 
latter to coordinate the shipment of 
supplies and to process and as.sem- 
ble the film. 

University E.xperts Named 

Heading the Iniversit) of .•south- 
ern California contingent is Dr. 
Max T. Krone, director of the In- 
stitute of Arts. Dr. Krone, audio- 
visual specialist and authority on 
folk songs, is collecting native mu- 
sic for the sound tracks. Others 
of the I . S. C. group are Robert 
Hall, coordinator of a-v education 
for the Los Angeles Countv superin- 
tendent of schools and teacher of 
cinematography at the ( niversitv. 
who is supervising and writing 
scripts; William F. Lowdermilk. di- 
rector, who recently completed an 
agricultural film on the Future 
Farmers of America; John Ray- 
mond, staff technician, cameraman 
and unit manager: and Irvin 
Kershner. professional photogra- 
pher and cinema student. Editing 
of the films will be under the direc- 
tion of Assistant Professor Wilbur 
T. Rlume. ."students from the Mid- 
dle East will narrate the produc- 
tions. 

The I ..^.C. group has a truck and 
trailer with 16mm cameras, a gen- 
erator and portable lighting plant. 
Dr. Don Williams. Syracuse Uni- 
versity's coordinator of a-y s<t\- 
ices, went overseas ahead of the 
unit and is returning to the Middle 




VKUUflliH 



luiinatt Firmt, LibronO, Adxrtiiing Com- 
ponid, Film Diitribulori, clc, Vocuumot* 
Corporolion oRari quick raliaf for lllm haod- 
oth»« 

SY TAKING OVE( COMPLETE 
FILM HANDIINC PIOBIEMS 

• FILM PROCESSING 
• CLEANING 
• REPAIRING 
• SHIPPING 
• STORAGE 
All boohmgi prompfly 
Kll*d. 



If onlir o litQl* 
r««l or monr. 

VaCMWMO'* 

will tafv* yew 

• •ll. Wflta for 

• nfomotion 

NOW, 



W.W"li|iP.\i«4.:.IJIK!.'l 



cnrsDwrrncTC 



fc.a>t III June. In charge ..f .-tdti'side 
operations is Sol Dworkin. Miss 
Luella V. Snyder is ass<-mliling the 
film shot overseas and William F. 
Gclabert is handling shipment of 
supplies. 

Athe.>s Personnel in Field 

William Clifford is directing pro- 
duction in the field, with Mrs. Jane 
Clifford assistant director and 
Speight Cooper writing scripts. The 
three are members of the staff of 
the Southern Film Producers Asso- 
ciation of .•\thens. Ca. Miss Ann 
I.. Myer. a-v instructor at Syracuse, 
is business manager with the over- 
seas group. 

Associate producer is Dr. Rich- 
ard D. Lewis, a-v instruction direc- 
tor at .Santa Jose I California I Col- 
lege. Frank Fergusen of the Iowa 
State College staff, is a cameraman. 
Richard Kennedy, assistant sound- 
man, is soundman and cameraman 
of the Photographic Sound Service 
at Cornell Universitx. 

15(1 Overseas Film Libraries 

\ large and varied selection of 
films is used in the Department of 
."slate overseas program, which also 
includes press and publications ac- 
tivities, exchange of students and 
national leaders, libraries and insti- 
tute programs and the ""Voice of 
America" radio broadcasts. Of the 
L. S. Foreign ."service establish- 
ments some 150 have film libraries, 
which average .300 titles each, some 
up to 750 films, with most of them 
in the language of the country. 

Pictures and projectors are loaned 
free, the films in many instances in 
blocks to private organizations and 
government agencies for use in their 
own programs, such as in those of 
the ministries of health, educalion 
and agrii'ulture. The mobile units 
of the Stale Department also show | 
the films in isolated rural areas 
overs<'as. 

Crawleys Make a Fivefold Bid 
To Win Canadian Film Awards 

♦ Crawley F'ilnis has five hats in 
ihe ring, in the ('om|M-tilion for the 
l''.>l Canadian Film Awards. The 
live land one is a package of five 
on child development sponsored b\ 
the Mi'(fraw-Mill Rook ('ompany I 
include Pouer nj I'rnnie.t. made for 
ihe Dairy Farmers of Canada: The 
Story of Pierre ami Marie, spon- 
sored by The (,)uelM-c I'ulp and 
l'.i|>«T Safetv A'^xM-iation : \eu- 
ii'uiuilaiiH I lm|.irrial Oil Limited), 
and Pin Hi/^h (Seagram.* I, j 



UNITED STATES GYPSUM CO. 
AMERICAN BISCUIT & CR 
FOOTE, CONE & BE 

SEARS-ROEBUC 
SUNKIST 










^W 



rr 



(D ^ 



V 



MERCURY INTERNATIONAL PICTURES. INC. 

1415 Coast Blvd. • Corona Dol Mar, Calif. 

CHICAGO: Dflowara 7-3*34 • lOS ANOfUS: ZfnMi «00« 
CORONA on MAB: HArbor 1312 



COMPLETELY AUTOMATIC 




AUTOMATIC PROJECTION 



Colorful. wvr.chongmg diiployt of 
your product contmu* andUtily for 
doyt upon doyt wh»n you msrchondit* 
wirh S*l«<trotlid*, For thit fully oulo- 
motic 2t2 «lid« proi^ctof uivt 41 
colorful ic«n*i lo t«ll yovr itory for o 
(•w c*nt% o doy B«tt of oM. by on 
• icluitv« procvti d***lop«d by thv 
mokvrt of S«l«<tro»lid*. «0<h tl<d« COn 
now b« titUd. giving inforinofion obowt 
ifyl*. «iod«l nwMb«r. pnc* ond ovoil- 
obdity of your producft. without inl»r. 
fvrtng wtth th« ptclur* or*o. 



Now, K*avy *quFpm«nl con b* tKown 
octuolly on th« |ob. Furnitur* con b« 
»old b*n«r froM on octwol room tvnmg. 
glowingly d«pitt«d m nofwrot colo«. 
Any product, no aiOtt«r how imall or 
Kow torg*. con b« iii«rchandift*d b*n»r 
wh*n prOt«Ct«d fro* •<onom<COl. voiy 
to produc* color ■lid«%. Wh«th*« In o 
dikploy room, o con*«ntK>n goi*i«ring. 
Of a proip*<tiv« cuflomvr i oA<«. 
S«lo<trotlid« con K«lp do o b«tt«r 
••lling rob for ony prodtKl Wrt*« 
now tor further inferAot.oR 



FOR 

S*//ing-froining — 

(Onvcntioni — diipfo^i 

— lo/«i rooms — /obbivi. 



SPinObER & SRUPPE 

2201 BEVERLY BOULEVARD 
LOS ANGELES 4. CALIFORNIA 



Mm h k |{ : 



• \ O I, I M t I : • I ■» 5 I 



A NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF VISUAL EDUCATION DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 



• CONNKCTICl'T • 



Rorkuoll Film & Projoolion 
S«T>ir»'. 1!!2 Hij;li Si.. ll;iilfor<l .'>. 

Easlorn Film IJhruri»'». 148 Grand 
Street. \\ atrrlmrv 5. 



• DISTRICT OF COLl'MBI A • 



Jam Handy Organization. Inr., 

Transportation Bldp;.. Washing- 
ton 6. 

The Film CenU-r, 915 12th St. 
N.W., Washington. 

The Walcotl-Tavlor Cftmpanv, 
Inc., 501 Mills' HIdg.. Viashin'g- 
ton, 6, D. C. 



• MARYLAND • 



Robert L. Davis, P. 0. Box 572, 
Cumberland. 

Howard E. Thompson, Box 204, 
Mt. Airy. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Railev Film Service, 59 Chandler 
Street, Tel. 4-0214, Worcester 8. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



A. H. Rice Co., Inc., 78 West Cen- 
tral Street, Manchester. 



• NEW JERSEY • 

Slidecrafl Co., South Orange, N. J. 

• NEW YORK • 



Association Films, Inc., 35 West 

45lh Street, New York 19. 

Buchan Pictures, 79 Allen St., 
BufFalo. 

Charles J. Giegerich, 42-20 Kis- 
sena Blvd., Flushing. 

Comprehensive Service Co., 245 

W. .i.'.lh St., New York 19. 

Council Films, Inc., 50 N. Main 
St., Homer, N. Y. 

Crawford & Immig, Inc., 265 W. 

14lh St., New York Citv 11. 



The Jam Handy Organization, 
Inc., 177.') Broadway, New York. 

Ken Killian Sd. & Vis. Pdts. 
P. 0. Box Myl H.in|».tead. N. Y. 

.Mogiill, Film and Camera Com- 
panv, 112-111 W. 'With St., New 
York 1<). 

I'aroniel Co., 40-18 Astoria Blvd., 
South. Long Island City 3. 

Jack Patent. 13 East 37th Street, 
New ^ Ork 16. 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp., 

602 W. 52nd St., New York 19. 

Sp'^cialized Sound Products Co.. 

551 Fifth Ave.. New York 17. 

United Specialists, Inc., Pawling. 
Visual Sciences, 599BS Suffern. 



• PENNSYLVANIA • 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

917 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh 22. 

J. P. Lilley & Son, 277 Boas St., 
Harrisburg. 

Lippincott Pictures. Inc., 4729 
Ludlow St.. Philadelphia 39. 



• RHODE ISLAND • 

Westcott, Slade & Balcom Co., 

95-99 Empire St., Providence 3. 



• WEST VIRGINIA • 

J. G. Haley, P. 0. Box 703, 
Charleston 23. 

Pavis, Inc., 427 W. Washington St., 
Phone 2-5311, Box 6095, Station 
A, Charleston 2. 

United Specialties, 816 W. Vir- 
ginia St., Charleston 2. 

Theatre Service & Supply Co., 

Phone 24043, Box 1389, Hunting- 
ton. 



SOUTHERN STATES 



• ALABAMA • 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 506 Eight- 
eenth St., North, Birmingham. 

• FLORIDA • 

Norman Laboratories & Studio, 

Arlington Suburb, Jacksonville. 



Soutlicrn Photo and News, 608 
E. Lalayelle .St., Tarnpa. 

• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, HI!! W. Peachtree 
St., N.W., ATwood 7.588, Atlanta. 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 101 Walton 

St., N. W., Atlanta 3. 

• LOUISIANA • 

Stanley Projection Company, 

211% Murray St., Alexandria. 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 1307 Tu- 
lane Ave., New Orleans. 

Stirling Visual Education Co., 

1052 Florida St., Baton Rouge. 

Delta Visual Service, Inc., 815 

Poydras St., New Orleans 13. 

HarFilms, inc., 600 Baronne St., 
New Orleans. Since 1915. 



• MISSISSIPPI • 

Herschel Smith Company, 119 

Roach St., Jackson 110. 

Jasper Ewing & Sons, 227 S. State 
St., Jackson 2. 



• TENNESSEE • 

Southern Visual Films, 687 

Shrine Bldg., Memphis. 

Tennessee Visual Education 
Service, 416 A. Broad St., Nash- 
ville. 



• VIRGINIA • 

Capitol Film & Radio Co., Inc., 

19 W. Main St., Richmond 20. 

National Film Service, 202 E. 

Gary St., Richmond. 

Tidewater Audio-Visual Center, 

617 W. 3,5th St.. Norfolk P.. Phone 
51371. 



• ARKANSAS • 

Democrat Printing and Litho- 
graphing Co., Little Rock. 
Grimm-Williams Co., 115 W. 

Sixth Street, Little Rock. 



MIDWESTERN STATES 



• ILLINOIS • 

American Film Registry, 24, E. 

Eighth Street, Chicago 5. 

.Association Films, Inc., 206 S. 

Michigan Ave., Chicago 5. 



Jam Ilundy Organization, Inc., 

230 \. Miihigan .Ave.. Chicago 1. 

Midwest Visual Equipment Co., 

6961 N. Clark St.. Chicago 26. 

Swank Motion Pictures, 614 N. 

Skinker Blvd., St. Louis .5, Mo. 



• INDIANA • 

Burke's Motion Picture Co., 434 

l.imoln Way W e?<t. South Bend 5. 

• IOWA • 

Pratt Sound Films, Inc., 720 3rd 

Ave.. .S.E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Ryan Visual Aids .Service, 409-11 
Harrison St.. Davenport. 



• K.ANSAS-MISSOURI • 



Kansas City Sound Service, 1402 
Locust St.. Kansas Citv 6, Mo. 

Erker Bros. Optical Co., 610 
Olive St., St. Louis 1. 

Swank Motion Pictures, 614 N. 

.Skinker Blvd., St. Louis 5. 



• MICHIGAN • 



Engleman Visual Education 

Service, 4754-56 \^ oodward Ave., 
Detroit 1. 

Jam Handv Organization, Inc., 

2821 E. Grand Blvd., Detroit 11. 

Capital Film Service, 224 Abbott 
Road, East Lansing, Michigan. 



• MINNESOTA • 

National Camera Exchange, 86 S. 

Sixth St., New Fanners Mechanics 
Bank Bldg., Minneapolis 2. 



• OHIO • 



Ralph V. Haile & Associates, 

215 Walnut St., Cincinnati. 

-Academy Film Service Inc., 2300 
Payne Ave., Cleveland 14. 

Carpenter Visual Service, Inc., 

13902 Euclid Ave., East Cleveland 

12, Ohio. 



USE THIS DIRECTORY TO LOCATE THE BEST IN EQUIPMENT, FILMS AND PROJECTION SERVICE 



78 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



LOCAL AUDIO-VISUAL SUPPLIERS 



Fryan Film Service, 3228 Eurlid 
Ave., Cleveland 15. 

Sanray Films, Inc., 2108 Payne 
Ave., Cleveland 14. 

Jam IIun<ly (tr^uiiization. Inc., 

310 Talbott Hiiildin};, Dayton 2. 

Twyman Films Inc., 400 \^'est 
First Street, Dayton. 

M. H. Martin Company. iO 

Charles Ave., S. E. Massillon. 



• WISCONSIN • 



R. H. Flath Company, 2410 N. 3d 
St., Milwaukee 12. 



WESTERN STATES 



• CALIFORNIA • 

Donald J. Clausonthue, 1829 .\. 
Craig Ave., Aitadena. 

Coast Visual Educatitm Co.. 5620 
Hollywood Blvd.. Hollvwnod 28. 

Hollyvkooil Camera Exchange, 

1(>(X) N. Cahuenga Blvd., Holly- 
wood 28. 

Jam Hundv Organization, Inc., 

"OK) Holivwood Blvd., Los An- 
geles 28. 

Raike Company, 829 S. Flower St., 
Los .Angeles 17. 

Spindler & Sauppe, 2201 Beverly 
Blvd., I. OS .Angeles 4. 

Association Films, Inc., 351 Turk 
St., .San Francisco 2. 

C. R. Skinner .Manufacturing 
Co., 292-294 Turk .St.. San Fran- 
cisco 2. 



• COLORADO • 

Home Movie Sales .Agency, 28 E. 
Ninth Ave., Denver 3. 



• OKLAHOMA • 

Vaseco, 2301 Classen, Oklahoma, 
City 6. 

If. O. Davis, 322 N. Broadwav. 
Oklahoma City 2. 

kirkpatrick. Inc.. 1634 S. Boston 
Ave., Tulsa 5. 



• OREGON • 

Audio-Visual Suppiv Companv, 

429 S. W . 12th Ave.,' Beacon 3703, 
Portland 5. 

Moore's .Motion Picture Service, 

306 S. W. Ninth Ave., Portland 5. 



• TEXAS • 

.\ssocliilion FiliiiM. Inc.. \'>\7t Mm- 
Oak St.. I)aila> 1. 

.Audio Video, Inc., 4000 Ross Ave., 
Dallas 4; 1702 Austin Ave., 
Houston. 

Oorge H. Mitchell Co., 712 N. 

Ila>kell, Dallas 1. 

Capitol Photo Supplies, 2428 
Guadalupe St., Phone 8-5717, 
Austin. 



• UTAH • 

Deseret Book (Company, 44 E. So. 
Temple St., Salt Lake City 10. 



CANADA 



Audio•^'isual Supply Company, 

Toronto General Trusts Building, 
Winnipeg, Man. 



FOREIGN 



Distriliuidora Filmica Venezo- 
lana De 16\IM.. S.A., Apartado 
706 Caracas, \ enezuela, S.A. 



Qualified Dealers In\ited 
to .\ppear in This Listing 

♦ If vou are a s(iccializing audio- 
visual dealer or distributor, you are 
invited to apply for listings in the 
National Directory pages of Blsi- 
Nf:ss Screen. A nominal servii «• 
charge is made for each acceptahlt 
listing. 

Application form M'nt on requ<-st. 
Listings in these pages are subject 
to cancellation if products or s«tv- 
ices are l>elow the minimum staml- 
nrd set bv the Editors ami reported 
by users in this field. We invite 
reader participation and patronagi- 




The products and services advertised in the pages of BiMNFjis 
SrRKKN are backeil by tin- iiianiifarliirer'- m-uI tif ipiality and liv 
the nationwide family of >pecitili/.ing uudio-\ ii.iial dealers. They 
merit your prfferred itatronage. 



SALES • SERVICE • REi^TALS 

35 mm. •16 mm. 

€AMERAS«MOVIOLAS*DOLLYS 

CompUlt Lim* of Eqyipmtmt for ProJiftiom AfsiUhl* for Reulsl 

Mitchell: Standard • Hi-Spced • NC - BNC • 16 mm. 

Bell & Howell: Standard • Shiftovcr • Eyemos 

Maurer: 16 mm. Cameras 

Moviola: Editing Machines • Synchronizers 

SPICIALISTS IN ALL TYPIS Or CAMIRA KIPAIR WORK. LINSIS MOUNTID 



'■A^B C IuC"l< 



A BUSINESS SCREEN READER SERVICE 



(7flfn€Rfl€ouiPfn€nT(o. 



Hiil 



MMBER 2 • VOLL.ME 12 • 1»S1 



T) 



MOTION PICTURE AND TELEVISION 

PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT 

FOR STUDIO OR LOCATION 

COLORTRAN LIGHTING EQUIPMENT 

"750" Watt unit — three spots, one broad, 
stniul.s, converter, cases; equivalent to 3000 

watts on less than 15 amps $298.50 

"2000" Watt unit — two three light units, 
stands, converter, ease; equivalent to 4000 

watts on less than 20 amps $180.38 

".".000" Watt unit two live light heads, 
stands, converter, case; eciuivalent to 10,000 

watts on less than 30 amps $230.00 

IninUMli:ile ili'livciy on ;ill units. 
GET COLOR RIGHT WITH COLORTRAN LIGHT. 

ARRIFLEX HEADQUARTERS 

Direct Factory Representatives 

Just impoiteil — new .\]iilKx .'!.')nini llami- 
camera. model II, built-in 12 volt motor 
and tachometer, set of three Zei.ss T-cali- 
brated lenses, two gear driven 200' maga- 
zines, sunshade and lightweight metal car- 
rying case. 

Soundproof blimp and synchronous motor 
for use in sound productions. Blimp has 
follow focus device and enables operator to 
use the reflex focusing system with paral- 
lax-free control. 

Tripods and baby tripod with specially de- 
signed head in bayonet mount for Arriflex 
camera. 

All spare gears and parts available, shut- 
ters, mirrors, gate assemblies, motors. 

CAMART CAMERA CAR 

CAMART TV MIKE BOOM • CAMART TRIPOO 

ITS HERE — THE NEW 1951 MART MESSAGE. 

.\re you on our mailing list? 



THE CAMERA • MART inc. 

70 WEST 4Slh ST 

NEW YORK 19. N. Y 

CABLE ADDRESS-CAMERAMART 

WORLDWIDE SERVICE 




For 16mm, Film — ^00' to 2000' Roeli 

Protect your films 
Ship in FIBERBILT CASES 

Sold «f leading dealer! 




U. S. Photographic Firms Participate 
in International Show at Cologne 

•^ More pronounced world flavor is asstircd 
this year's Cologne Intkrnational Photo and 
Cl.NKMA RxilIBlTlON (Photoliina 1951) as a re- 
sult of contai-ts new or strenfjtliened. through 
the visils of its director. I,. Fritz Gruhcr. to tlic 
I iiit<Ml .Slates and Kiiropean lenlers. 

The fair and oxhii)itioii. .\|)ril 20 to 29, will 
have much more space, with the buildings of 
the Cologne Fair restored to |irc-»var status. Iiul 
even then will he taxed to meet the demands for 
show-room. The exhiliition section will l>c cen- 
leri'd in the Slaati'nhaus. with larger and helter 
accofuniodations than last year, but will over- 
flow to other halls. The fair will spread out 
beyond the ground floors of the three main halls 
to accommodate space reservations, inircased up 
to one-half over the 1950 needs. The (jerman 
[)hol(>gra|)hic industrv requires so much footage 
to satisfy a|>plications that it is to use part of 
the first floor, most of which is reserved for 
foreign exhibitors. 

The exhibition program is laid out on a five- 
front agenda, to give a wide range of audio- 
visual interests their places in the Photokina 
sun. After an introductorv show around the 
theme, "Photography Brings Advantages for 
All." will come an instructional demonstration 
on "How a Photo Comes into Being." There 
will he an historical show and a scientific show 
in cooperation with the universities. An inter- 
national presentation of photographic achieve- 
ments will be a climax, with German amateurs 
and trade associations also participating. 

A feature is to be an "Advertising Street of 
Photography," and the illustrated press also will 
provide a highlight exhibition. 

American participation in the Cologne event 
will be reflected both by exhibitions of indi- 
vidual companies and by a joint display organ- 
ized by the Photographic Manufacturers and 
Distributors Association. 

The Eastman House Museum and the Mu- 
seum of Modern Art in New York will have 
exhibits of the latest developments in the fields. 
The magazine "Popular Photography" will show 
the winning amateurs" photos from its 1950 
prize contest. The publishers of "U.S. Camera" 
are sending the originals of its Year Book's 
"best achievements" awards. "Life" Magazine 
also is entered as an exhibitor. 

A special pavilion for the press of the United 
States is planned. 

When Cruber was in .America last December 
he was given direct assistance bv economic and 
business leaders, the .Marshall Plan ofEcc and 
the cultural section of the State Department, in 
lining up the scope of the Cologne program and 
in surveying the many spheres of advamed 
photographic technics. 



Scralched 

Film 

Saved! 



Crillcal malrnal ihorlaurt make Ihc RAPIO- 
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old film, and the RAPIDTREAT proem for 
preiervlno new film « muit. Hundred* of 
l&idina firmi ttirouohout thr country atlett 

lo Ihir AMAZING RESULTS 

«r« have achieved »Hh thrir 
I6MM. 35MM. OrlglnaU. 
Kodachrtm*. Nagatlvat. and 
Prints. All work uncondl- 
(ionally guaranteed. Write 
far rre« detcrlptlva booklet. 
Ovpt. BS. 



StralchM 

Abraalaaa 

on MotlU 

Olrt 

REMOVED 






STEREO BINDERS 
SCLF- ALIGNING, 
SfLF-CENTERING 




STEREO BINDERS 

ALL STEEL — WITH GLASS 

Mounting tiereo ilidei is •o>x with thet* 
binders that outomotically center and align 
the film. Codmium plated framet, witti 2 
pieces of clear glass protect ogoinsl finger- 
prints, dirt, dusl. No masks, tape, or tools 
needed. Snap together, and apart for use 
over ond over. Fit all popular viewers and 
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34 complete sett $4.50 

Alto ovoliable in large bulk quantltlet 
Price* on request 

BRUMBERGER STEREO FILES 
FOR SAFE A HANDY STORAGE 



Wr.la lo, flf C«rA(OC 

24 Thirty-Fourth St., Bklyn. 32, N. Y. 



SOUND RECORDING 

at a reasonable cost 

High fidelity 16 or 35. Quality 

guaranteed. Complete studio and 

laboratory services. Color printing 

and lacquer coating. 

ESCAR 

MOTION PICTURE SERVICE. 

7315 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland 3, Ohio 



TEACHERS 

LECTURERS 
DEMONSTRATORS 

No more woodan stick 
pointers! Use the Optical 
Pointer up to W ft. from 
screen. 

POSTAGE 

[prepaid 



RAPID FILM TECHNIQUE INC. 

21 W 46th Strael. Ntw York 19, N. Y 



PROJECTSMICHT 



ARROWHCAO 



Bright V«e of light clearly points 
Out subjtct matter on screen! 
Bright light! Light weight! Fits 
your hdndl Send chick or money 
order today! 

DEALERS INVITED 



PENBERTHY INSTRUMENT COMPANY 

Dept. 16, 666 Adams St.. SeaHle 8. Washington 




► 



''color-correct''*' prints 
are best 



yecaiisc 



Printing lamps used by us arc matched to a standard that is 

calibrated by the United States Bureau of Standards. 

which guarantees a constant Kelvin temperature at all times. 

Density changes are necessary to secure the maximum quality 
for each individual scene. In our laboratory these density 
changes are accomplished by an electronically controlled 
shutter in the light beam, similar in action to the iris 
of your camera. This method varies only the amount of light 
and N1:V1;R the color temperature. 

• The ordinary method, used by many other labs, involves 
"light change boards" . . . t-niployiiig a series of 
resistors that vary the brilliancy of the lamp itself . . . 
coiisee/uently changing the color temperature of the 
print from scene to scene as much, or more than 
1,000 degrees Kelvin. 

Color duplicating stock requires the correct 

color temperature in printing, just as surely 

as the color film in the camera . . . Top-notch cameramen 

working with color know they must hold ihe correct color 

temperature of the light source. 

The printing process is just as exacting in its 
requirements as the photographic process. If a 
scene is to be properly duplicated it must be 
printed by a "color-correct" process and . . . 



"color-correct"''' is cxcltisirc lyilh 



^ byron 



* I udr-Mjrk Ktclutiv-r with Bvron 



lh« whimot* in 16mm. 
S'vdiol and laboraiotj. 

1726 Wiwoniin An. NW Woihinglen. D. C. 
Pllon* Owponl I MM 




iKgimaim^ 



To help get any new program 
launched and get your plans exe- 
cuted without disclosure, call in The 
Jam Handy Organization. 

Well prepared to keep your ideas 
and information under cover, while 



getting the job done right and right 



on time, is 



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JAM HANDY 




'This much wt- ^ ■.•.,, .vu kjui greatest contribution (o 
the defense elion is keeping our mouths shut, as all 
ol us must do. 



UALIZATIONS • PRESENTATIONS • EDUCATIONAL MOTION PICTURES 



SLIDEFILMS • TRAINING ASSISTAl 



W YORK 19 



WASHiNnrnM n r e 



w ^\r> ■k*«^r>TT?o <lfl 



. .TOP VALUE FILMS 
FOR TELEVISION 




STOP MOTION 




WE'RE MAKIN' MONEY 

FOR OUR CLIENTS! 



An ever-increasing group of nationui advertisers is learning thai 
38 years of Atlas know-lioM' is an iinpoi-tant faetor in the produc- 
tion of top-value (ilnis for television . . . films that produce resullti. 

Idea conception, creative planning, expert casting, photography, 
animation, recoi-iiing. processing . . . all iiiuler one roof . . . 
provide maxiuuim control an<I give added assurance of meeting 
your deadlines. 

^our incpiiry is invitetl. 



ATLAS FILM CORPORATION 



1111 South Boulevard 
Oak Park, Illinois 



SPECIAL EFFECTS 



(EST. 1913) 

228 North LaSalle Street 
Chicago 1, Illinois 

Chicago Telephone: AUstin 7-8620 




There Is No Substitute 
for Craftsmanship 



MANY TIMES in tlu- last 30 yi-ars CaruMl lias lu't-ii 
selected to produce films that call for infinite attention 
to detail . . . 

• A recent instance was the selection of Caravel to re- 
produce on film the superb artistry of "Contour"— a 
new pattern created by Towle Silversmiths, "witli 
craft traditions since 1690." 

• We are especiall\' proud of "Design for Toda\ ." It 
is last-word e\ idence. we think, that whether our as- 
signment is a K) iniinite slidefilm in black and white 
or a feature-length motion picture. Caravel craftsmen 
work to a single standard — the \er\ finest in quality 
production. 

• W'v shall be happy to show you "Design for Today," 
with the client's pemiission. of course, and to point 
up our background of experience with visual proof. 
Whether your problem calls for films to train workers 

or to train salesmen ... or to sell goods direct . . . 
or to promote g<M)d relations with emplovees or the 
public there is no siil)stitute for eraftsuuiitship! 



m 



CARAVEL FILMS 



INCORPORATED 



730 FIFTH AVENUE 



NEW 



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I" 



OP 






• • STOP REPORTS like these from your Salesmen!] 



Your business is different, we agree — and so are the many organizations 
using the AGGRESSIVE SELLING SERIES, which was specifically 
designed for those alerted firms who are ready NOW to revitalize their 
sales activities .... retrain their older salesmen . . . and train their 
newer men in advanced techniques for meeting and beating every kind 
of resistance. 

"Aggressive Selling" is a complete sales training program consisting 
of eight sound slidefilms: 



These firms are just a few who know that "Aggressive Selling" will 
train men HOW TO SELL — HOW TO GET MORE ORDERS. 



1. "The Sleeping Giant" 

2. "By-Passing Sales Resistance" 

3. "The Attitude That Gets Business" 

4. "What Do You Sell?" 



5. "Are prospects Really Different.' 

6. "Pride In Price" 

7. "Human Rclacions In Selling" 

8. "Close Isn't Closed" 



DuPont 

General Electric Co. 

B. F. Goodrich Co. 

Kraft Cheese Co. 

De Soto Motors 

Rexall Drug Company 

Packard Motors 

Quality Bakers of America 



Hoffman Radio Corp. 
National Wheel & Rim 
The Austin Co. 
Vancouver Sun 
Pacific Tel. & Tel. 
Ford Motor Co. 
National Brewing 
Prudential Ins. Co. 



These films — plus sales meeting material for each film — plus follow up 
letters — furnish training dynamite for a minimum of 21 consecutive 
meetings. This is a permanent training program . . . and the help that 
only YOU can give your salesmen is made easy for YOU and lasting 
for THEM through the use of our visual training aids. 



Let "Aggressive Selling" increase the effectiveness of YOUR men by 
giving them an understanding of the attitudes and techniques that 
apply to all market conditions, whether it be: 

COMPETITIVE SELLING 

or 
ALLOCATION SELLING 

WRITE NOW for details. Arrange a personal showing of these power- 
ful films in your office. 



GUIDED lll/n MISSILES 





V \^ 



6108 SANTA MONICA BLVD. 



HOLLYWOOD 38, CALIF 



GRANITE 7131 



11 



Ou^ y)^^ iwd<iae^ Wltj kit mm/ 

— says E. B. Peters, suparvisor of personnel, The Ohio Oil Co., Terre Haute, Ind. 



}l 




S^0^§i^^ 



)OX 18, 1S50 



r(\-i 



n« 






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DPinn. 



FOR SHOWING industrial films of all types you 
want a projector that brings out every detail — 
gives unobtrusive operation -delivers full, natural 
sound -and will stand up under hard usage. That's 
why Filmosound is the favorite in industry today I 
Write today for further information and for our 
new booklet, "Free Film Sources." 



SINGLE-CASE FILMOSOUND 

Till- liiiiim Sitinli'-C;isc Filini>- 
.sound shown hci-e is only one 
of scvcml models available. It is 
easy to operate and easy to 
cnrrv. And it's guaranteed for 
life' 



OoaraatMrf Iw III*. Duiin« IKc of th* 
priKlucl. .injf dcfrcU In worknijunhlp 
or maHTl»l» will b» r«i»»dl»<l Im i»»- 
CTpi truuporuUon). 



You buy for life when you buy 

II K Howell 

Cliicago 45 




N U M B K K 3 • \ O 1. 1 M E 12 • 1 •> 5 1 




For your 16 mm. scientific 

film requirements 

use Precision . . . 

• Over a decade of 16 mm. in- 
dustrial film printing in black 
and white and color. 

• Fine grain developing of all 
negatives and prints. 

• Scientific control in sound 
track processing. 

• lOCf optically printed tracks. 

• Expert timing for exposure 
correction in black & white or 
color. 

• Step printing for highest pic- 
ture qualit)'. 

• Special production eiTeits. 

• Exclusively designed Maurec 
equipment. 

• Personal scr\ Ire. 




ort processed ot 



PRECISION 

FILM UBORATORIES. INC. 

21 West 46th St, 

New York 19, N.Y. 

JU 2-3970 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 

"I he \titit)mil liiisiiii'ss Joiininl iif iiiilii>-l isiiiil ( omnniiiii iilinns 

l*r4'Vi4>\V 4»f l'4»lll4>lllS 

Tin- Oflscri-cri \ i>ii:e: Kditorial Notes and Coninientar) 8 

Hf|>orl on I'nidvdinfis: Ml\\ Annual SMPTK Mi'etinp 10 

Special Ufffiisc Report: Have \\ e Time to Train'/ 25 

Better Film Utilization in the Field 27 

Practical Hints for Plant "Movie Day" 28 

Vast .\udien(»' Hears Freedom's Rin-r: Swift Preview 29 

Detailed .\iial\sis of .Swift Promotion on flig lilea 'M\ 

This Is Life: The American Meat Institute's New Film 32 

Case Histories of the New Pictures 

The .\merican Medical Association's They Also Serve 28 

Pennsylvania's Waters of the Commonwealth; Ethyl's There Is 

a Difference; Girl Scouts' The Growing Years .'{4 

Olin Industries' It's the Counted Pieces That Count; Sun Oil 
Company's ./.-/.■/ Road Test; Dun & Bradstreets Credit, Man's 
Confidence in Man; International Silver Company's Desifins 
for a Homemaker 35 

West Virginia's Vocational Rehabilitation Film 38 

Business Screen Camera 

The .News in Pictures: NAVA's Sales Institute; Armed Forces 

Communications Institute; Canadian Film .Awards 36 

There's a Ford Film in Your Future: Feature 37 

Business Screen Editorial Departments 

In the Picture Parade: Notes on New Films 44) 

On the Production Line: Pictures and Producers 12 

.New .Audio-Visual Equipment and Accessories 44 

Business Screen Executive: People in the News 46 

Puis: The Natio.nwl Directory 

OF LoC.\I. Al DIO-VlSUAL EDUCATION DeaLERS 



r4»iiiiii;£ |{dil4»riul AllriiclionN 

A .National .Survey of Repair and .Maintenance Facilities for the Standard Lines 
of Audio-Visual Projection Equipment 

The Index of Sponsored Films: Complete Listing of Films and Sponsors Dating 
Back to March, 1950 Issue of Business Screen 

The Weslinghouse Film Program: \ Featured Report on the Current Motion 
Picture Activities of Weslinghouse Electric & Mfg. Corp. 

In Our Hands: a Field .Analysis and Human Interest Report on the Freedom's 
Foundation Prize-\\ inning .Motion Picture & Ea.sel Program at Inland Steel Co. 

An .Audio-\ isual Program for the Small Plant: Practical .Suggestions on Films 
and Equipment for Companies Employing 50, 100 or 2(K) Employees 



Issue Tlirct' <»f \'oIuin«' Twi-Kc 



Mav-Jiinc 



lo.-.l 



Issue Three. \'olumc Twelve of Business Screen Magazine published May 21, 1951. Issued 8 tinw 
annually at six-week intervals at 150 Kast Superior .Street, Chicago II. Illinois liv Business Screen MaK> 
zin.x. I„, I'hone WHiteliall 4-(i«(l7 O. H. Coelln, Jr.. Editor and Publisher. In New York City: Rob- 
ert Seymour. Jr., Am l-'iltb .Xvcniic Ti-Upbonr Riverside "ll.'l.^ nr \Hrr:iy Mill J-24yj. In Los An 
geles: Edmund Kerr, (>(>05 Hollywoo<l Blvd. Tilephone llEnipsiead .5171. Sub>cription $.?.(IU a .war 
$5,00 two years (domestic); $4.IK) and $7.00 toreign. Kntcred as second class matter May 2. 1946, at tl' 
post oflficc at Chicago, Illinois, under .^ct of March i. 1879. Kntirc contents Copyright 1951 by Businc - 
Screen Magazines. Inc. Trademark registered LI. S. Patent Office, .\ddrcss advertising and subscripti"' 
inquiries to the Chicago ofhcc oi publication. 



BI.-ilNESS SCREEN M\r;\ZIM 




RE DIT... MAN'S CONFIDENCE IN MAN 



CHICAGO== 

I.VJ5 Argylc Street 

NEW YORK 

385 Madison Ave. 




Virtually all commercial credit transactions in America 
today are predicated on ratings established by Dun \ Bradstrect. 

Their vast credit reporting organization protects business- 
men by determining the financial integrity of those tt) whom 
credit must be extended. This rating is the accepted standard 
of financial responsibility. 

We are, therefore, proud that when Dun & Bradstreet de- 
cided to tell un film the story of "Credit . . . Mans Confidence 
in Man," they selected Wilding as the prtxlucer. 

Arrangements to sec this film can be made through .in> 
\\ ilding branch office. 



WILDING 

PICTURE PRODUCTIONS, INC. 



DETROIT='= 

4925 Cadicux Rd. 



CLEVELAND 

310 Swetland Bldg. 



HOLLYWOOD^ 

5981 Venice Blvd. 



ST. LOUIS 

4053 Lindell Blvd. 



CINCINNATI 

Enquirer Bldg. 
'Studio Facilities 




r^ix'v^I ¥^II \IC 



Feature for Feature . . . 




No Other 
Color Duplicating Film 

caf? match AN SCO Type 238! 



From the very beginning we knew that Ansco 
Type 238 Duplicating Film, once given a chance, 
would prove itself superior. For this reason we kept 
saying, ''''compare with any film on the market." 
Results have been astonishing. More and more 
Type 238 is being specified every day. 
If you haven't already made a comparison, 
we invite you to do so, today. Authorize your 
laboratory to make up your next order on Ansco 
Type 238 Color Duplicating Film... then see why we 
say it is the finest, all-around duplicating film obtainable. 

tor tincr, sh;iri)er definition, 
for faithful color reproduction. 

for clear, clean, whiter whites. 

for lifelike, hij;h-fidelity sound. 

jasl processing sennce through 




PLUS 



Nezv York, Chicago and Hollywood. 



Ansco 



BlNC;HAMION. NKW ^ORK. A DIVISION OF CKNERAL ANIIJNK & Mi.M COkl'UKATloN. 

•FROM RESEARCH TO RE-IUTY." 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINJ 



PiCTURtS 




brings out the^^^^ in your 16mm films 



^'ou see sharp, clear pictures on the screen when your l6mm 
films are shown with the RCA "400" projector. Increased 
screen illumination gives pictures greater brilliance. More 
striking contrasts make screen images sparkle with realism. 

You hear richer, more enjovahle tone. Voice, music and sound 
effects are reproiiuced with the quality yt)u are accustomed to 
in movie theatres. 

The RCA "400" projector is easier to thread than anv vou 
have ever tried. Controls are conveniently located for simpli- 
fied operation. 



KCA NIW "400" JUNIOR >i a lighlurighl. Mtr-I^^^m. timglf 

i,i\c U'Wrn iolt'tJ prnjfitor of fitlh pf^fiiioHttl tfm^tit^. 

■ CA "400" SINIOI />roi/</ri ihtjtrt iimjlilt rtprojmcimm ^ 
ll<mm tonHti filmi J»r Ijrgrr juJirifn. tmJifrimmt or 
lurgtr rooms. 

Vrilt litpl. IJi: Jommpliit JtUih. 



VISUML PRODUCTS 

RADIO CORRORATIOM of AMERICA 



Ciin<«i ICA VICTOI CM>pMy 11«>«W. »«».■■ »il 



Nl'MHKR .1 • \Ol.l MK \l - I'»:. I 



T II I 



better 



RADIANT SCREEN 



brighter 
clearer 
pictures 



# 




New Radiont Gtasi 
Bcodcd Screen Sur- 
face — made by exclu- 
live Radiont proceii. 
Millioni of tiny Q\att 
beads reflect light 
intteod of absorbing 
it — giving brighter, 
cleorer. sharper pic- 
tures. 



New Rodiant Wash- 
able Fobric — enables 
vou to keep your screen 
surfoce glistening while 
olwoyi. Just wipe with 
domp clolh — tkol'i oil 
there ii to ill 



mildew 
proof 
fabric 





New Radiant Mildew- 
Proof Screen Fabric 

— Exclusive special 
RodionI fabric protects 
your screen from dis- 
coloration by mildew or 
fungus. Screen ttoyi 
snowy while for yearti 



flameproof 
fabric 



New Radiant Flome- 
Proof Fabric — win 

nol support a flame. 
Gives odded protection 
ogoinst screen domoge. 
Il the tafe«t screen you 
con buy I 



/ 



.i.. 



send for free sample 

of this omoiing new Rod'ortl screen fobric. See 
Kow much more brilliant your pictures con be on 
this mirocle fabric. Write for il todoy — olso for 
latest illuilroted brochure on complete line of 
RodionI porlobte, wolt ond (able screens for all 
purposet. 

RADIANT MFG. CORPORATION 
1270 S. Talman Ave, Chicago 8, Illinois 



RADIANT 



i C ■ I i ■ f 




s rn K E A^ 



o-cCS 



KDITOKI AT. NdTF.S XND COMMFNTAFtY 

THini;'.-. l!i,\nAl. .VllSK. uut nf l)u\<-ii|)(irt. 
louii this month as the rumored return to 
the iUi<lio-\ isuiil fold of pioneer .Siim Kose. 
oiH' of the foundini; fathers of the Victor Ani- 
miit(>^ra|ih (lorporalioii. lieeaine factual news. 

Purchase of Victor interests by Mr. Kose and 
a group of associates was announced on May 
22. The Imsincss. which was founded in Daven- 
port in I'MO. has lieen operated as a division of 
the Curliss-Wrifjht (Corporation for the past fi\e 
Nears. .As president and treasurer of Victor 
\riimalograph C<)r|)oration. a newly-formed 
Iowa cor|)()ratioii. Mr. Rose will resume active 
management of the business. Head()uarlers will 
be retained in Davenport and administration, 
sales, and service will continue from there. 

A well-known group of long-time employees 
and executives continues in administrative ca- 
pacities with Horace O. Jones, Eldon Imhoff. 
and A. J. McClelland as vice-presidents, and 
T. M. Arp as secretary. These officers, together 
with Daniel Needham. Carl F. Woods, p.. V. 
Babbitt and George M. Friedlander. all of Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts, and George W. Lane. Jr.. 
of Lewiston. Maine, will be members of the 
iioard of directors. 

Victor has sales outlets llirough .'?.()()() dealers 
and 75 distributors in the continental I . .S. and 
in more than 60 foreign countries. The branch 
sales office in New York Citv is headed \i\ 
Mr. Jones. 

Inditslriiil Aiidio-lisuiil AssorialiDn 
Joiim !\alioiial Audio-J isual Convention 

■¥ Members of the Industrial Audio-Visual As- 
sociation will join with other commercial and 
educational groups attending the V)b\ National 
Audio-Visual Convention in Chicago from July 
26 to .31 at the Hotel Sherman. 

A meeting of lAVA mend)ers will be held on 
Monday. July 'M\. Following the luncheon on 
that day. industrial film executives will visit the 
trade show. Other organizations holding annual 
or special meetings during the Convention (je- 
riod are the Fducational Y'\\m Library Associa- 
tion, the Film Council of America, the Midwest 
Forum on Audio-Visual Aids, and N'AVA. 

An expanded trade show, including all tiic 
latest in a-v equipment, special devices, films. 
and accessories will fill both the Grand Ballroom 
and the Exhibition Mall at the Sherman for the 
first time in NAVA historv. 

Advvrtisinf- ii "Musi" for Ui-ji'nsv Economy 
Crtimhlv Tells Soiitltirest Apenry Exernlivt-s 

♦ Advertising is a "Musi" for a mobilized 
economy, not only to search out customers for 
the huge amount of goods and services avail- 
able now that production already is greater 
than at the high point of acti\itv in the last 
war. Iiut also to keep intact our distribution 
machinery. Frederic FL (>andile. jiresident of 
the American Association of Advertising Agen- 
cies, told the annual convention of the South- 
western Association of Advertising Agencies. 
Pointing out that the largest jilant expan- 



sion ever experienced in America is undi-r wa) 
I'resideiit (Jandile recalled that in Worlil Wa 
II the production of civilian goods and serv 
ices was virluallv iloubled while meeting dr 
fense needs, and declared that reeoril lan b 
duplicated now. 

I'ncertainties make the situation more difli 
<ult for advertisers today than "the all-out full 
scale war economv we faced and knew we facei 
in the spritig of 1942." the sjieaker said, bu 
to keep our economv strong there nmst b' 
strategic use of advertising now. He repeatei 
the statement of Charles E. Wilson, mobiliza 
tion chief, that "I have no intention and hop. 
it will not be necessary to maintain an econom; 
of scarcity." 

Safely Film Proves Life Stiver as Girl 
Rememlters Lesson From Keeeiil I'icliire 

■¥ "My husband and I will be eternally grate 
ful." a thankful mother recently wrote after thi 
life of her 11 year old daughter was saved bi 
seeing a fire safety film produced by the .Aut<i 
mobile Insurance Company and Standard Hri 
Insurance Company. 

The woman. Mrs. T. H. Moore of .Newington 
Conn., explained that her daughter, Marilyn 
was among the students who attended the show 
ing of the companies" film. Friend or foe. at thi 
North Newington school where she is a 6tl 
grade student. 

A few days later while Marilyn was at home 
she accidentally backed into a lighted gas stove 
Her flannel shirt burst into flames. Instead o) 
screaming and rushing into the living rooir 
where her parents were seated, she (|uickl) 
w rapped herself in a rug. rolled on the floor anc 
smothered the flames. 

When asked by her parents how she happene<l 
to know the correct action to take, Marilyn re 
plied that this was the way she had seen a person 
put out a clothing fire in the movie at sch< 

I he grateful mother wrote to the producers nl 
the movie: "By that film my daughter knew 
just what to do. Her quick action helped pre- 
vent more serious burns and may have saved 
her life." 

Friend or Foe is one of 21 films on loss pre- 
vention subjects offered for free distribution by 
the .4^tna Life Afliliated Companies as a part 
of their continuous campaign for greater safet\ 
at home, at work, at play and on the highwav. 



GI's View Traimnc Films in hroad daylif:lii 
and in the field llirniifili ihis inpenioiis rent 
lirojeclion Ixiolli develojieil hy the Triiiniiifi 
■lids Si'riion of the Sipniil Corps Training 
Center iit Cnmji Corilon. Cenreia ' f ,.S. triii\ I. 




BUSINESS SCREEN M.AC.AZINK 



vSKVi* 



|c Also produced in a French 
version for International's 
employees in Quebec. 



Today pulpwood is a perennial 
crop like wheat, corn or cotton -thanks to 
far-sighted forest management programs. 
The leader in this vital work is the Inter- 
national Paper Company, who annually 
grow many more trees than they harvest 



on the timberlands of the United States and 
Canada. To tell this story most effectively 
to International's employees, stockholders 
and consumers, our studios have produced 
IN PARTNERSHIP WITH NATURE -a dramatized 
documentary color film. 



DETROIT CHICAGO MINNIAPOL 




For Instant Movability 
and Advanced Design 



Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers 
Holds 69th Semi-Annuol Convention in New York 



"HYDROLLY" 

iTV or Camera Ooltyl 

Hydraulic lift typ« for fast up- 
ward and downward motion 
of TV and Motion Picture 
cameras. Lightweight sturdy 
- easily transpH^rted in a sta- 
tion wagon. Fits through a 
28" door. Ad)ustable levehng 
head. In-line wheels for track 
use. Steering wheel and floor 
locks. 




PRECISION -ACCURATE "SYNCHRONIZER" 




16mm or 35mm 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Any combination of sprockets assembled 
to your specifications. Sturdy cast alumi- 
num construction. Foot linear type, with 
frame divisions engraved on sprockets. 
Contact rollers adjusted individually ior 
positive film contact. Fast fingertip roller 
release, sprocket shaft slip lock, complete 
with footage counter. 



VARIABLE SPEED MOTOR with TACHOMETER 
for Cine Special Camera and Maurer Camera 



lis V. Universal Motor— AC-DC 
Variable Speed 8 - i4 Frames 
Separate Base for Cine Special 
Adapter for Maurer Camera 

INTERCHANGEABLE MOTORS: 

12 Volt DC Variable Speed 8-64 Frames. 
115 Volt AC 60 Cycle, Synchronous Motor. 
Single Phase. 

Animation Motors tor Cine Special. Maurer, B & 
H, Mitchell Cameias, Motors lor Bolex and Filmo 
Cameras, and Time Lapse Equipment. 

• LENS COATING 

• "T" STOP CALIBRATION 

• DESIGNING and MANUTACTURING 

of lens mountings and camera equipment 
(or IGmm and 35mm cameras. 

• BAUSCH & LOMB "BALTAR" 

LENSES and others for Motion Picture and 
TV Cameras 

• RENTALS — SALES — REPAIRS: 

Mitchell. Eyemo. Bell & Howell. Wall, Cine 
Special Cameras. 

Write for full information and prices 




NATIONAL CINE EQUIPMENT, Inc. 



♦ Kiiurlcen sessions were necessary 
for llie presentation of the 60 teeh- 
nical re|)i)rls mid llic disiussions of 
new (levelc>|iiiients in tlie fields at 
till- 69tli semiannual eonxentioii of 
the Society of Motion Picture and 
Television Engineers, which opened 
\pril M) at the Hotel Statler in New 
\ ork and closed on Mav 4. 

SMiipi>siunis of screen viewing 
factors and fdni |»rojection were of 
special interest, as concurrent meet- 
ings took up the new techniques, 
equipment, and applications, all in 
the field of high-sjjced pliotngrapln . 

Session On Screen Viewing 
At the screen viewing session on 
Wednesday forenoon, the speakers 
were Kenneth Shaftan of J. \. 
Maurer, Inc.. on progress in photo- 
graphic instrumentation, J. W. 
Beams and J. M. Watkins, Univer- 
sity of Virginia, on a high constant- 
speed rotating mirror; W, L. Hicks 
and R. L. Wright of Burroughs 
Adding Machine Co. on application 
of high-speed photography in busi- 
ness machines, and Maj. R. V. 
Bernier of the Air Force on three- 
dimension. 

The Wednesday afternoon ses- 
sion, on high-speed projection, 
brought discussion of the use of 
image phototube as a high-speed 
camera shutter, by Alsede W. Ho- 
gan, Naval Ordnance Laboratory. 
Silver Spring. Md.: cinefluorog- 
rapliv. by S. A. Weinberg. J. .'^. 
Vi atson. jr., M.Ll.. and G. H. Ram- 
sey. M.D.. I niyersity of Rochester: 
and simultaneous high-speed arc 
photography and data recording 
with the 16mni Fastax camera, by 
1-ugene L. Perrine and Nelson W. 
Rodelius, Armour Research Foun- 
dation. 

Magnetic Recording Progress 
Magnetic recording had the floor 
I' riday morning, with papers on 
tape transport theory-speed control, 
li\ J. R. Montgomery: special tech- 
niques, George Lew in of the Signal 
Corps Photographic Center; syn- 



chronous quarter-inch magnetic 
tape, also by I^win; synchronous 
sound track recording, by Went- 
worth D. Fling. Fairchild Recfirding 
Fqui|iment Corp.: push-jiull direct- 
positive recording, I-<eslie L Carey 
and Frank Moran of Universal- 
International: and fcrrite materials 
for magnetic heads, by Robert Herr, 
Minnesota Mining and Manufactur- 
ing Co. 

On Friday afternoon the magnetic 
recording discussion continued with 
papers by W. W, Wetzel, B. F, Mur- 
phey and Robert Herr, all of Min- 
nesota Mining, on high-frequency 
bias: George W, Colburn, editing: 
H, E. Roys of the RCA Victor Di- 
vision, edge-coated 16mm films: 
and James A. Larsen of Academy 
Films, improved Kodachrome sound 
i|uality with supersonic bias tech- 
nique. 

Film Projection Symposium 
At the film projection symposium 
on Thursday afternoon the topics 
and authors were: Influence of color 
of surround on hue and satura- 
tion, David L. MacAdams of Ko- 
dak: low photopic brightness, 
S, D. S. Spragg, University of 
Rochester: temperature-sensitive 
[.hosphors for evaluating air jets, 
F, J. Kolb. Jr., and F. Urbach, 
Kodak; an instrument to measure 
total light output at the lens, G, Gag- 
liardi and A. T. Williams; the 
effect of forced air cooling on car- 
bon arcs, Clarence Ashcrafl; and 
(continued on page 44) 



AUDIO-VISUAL 

PireUC RELATIONS SPECIAUST 

Broad Background: Training and Ex- 
perience in Production, Administra- 
tion, Instruction. Lecturing. A.B., M.S. 
Visual Communications. 

Box 5A 

BUSINESS SCREEN 

150 E. Superior St. 

Chicago 11,111. 



20 WEST 22nd STREET 



NEW YORK 10. N. Y. 



You should own the McGraw-Hill book 

FILMS IN BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 

by 

HENRY CLAY GiPSON 

President of 

FILMFAX PRODUCTIONS 

Fllmfax produces motion pictures and slide- 
films for all business purposes but special- 
izes (with a production background of over 
200 titles) In color filmstrips for use in 
education. 
Order your copy from FILI^FAX PRODUCTIONS. 10 East 43rd St.. New York 17. N.Y. 




10 



BUSINES.S SCREEN MAGAZINE 




MUSIC INSTRUCTION 

Practice really counts when 
students can listen to their 
own performances. Ideal 
for school band and orches- 
tra, chorol groups, individ- 
uol musicians. 




FOtEIGN LANGUAGES 

Proper accent and mfieciton 
are best obtoined when 
students h«ar their own 
vok««. ond compare their 
own recordings wtih those of 
expert linguists. 



VERSATILE TEACHING TOOL 
FOR EVERY MODERN SCHOOL 




STENOGRAPHY PRACTICE 

Carefully timed dictation 
exercises moy be recorded 
once, used over ond over 
again. Free the teacher for 
individual instruction. 



One of the most important educational 
innovations of recent years is the ever-growing 
use of the Revere Recorder. Teachers and school 
principals call it "the most versatile teaching 
tool a modern school can own" because almost 
every class benefits from it! 

Learning is faster and more efficient when 
students can hear true-as-life recordings of their 
own and their cla.ssmates' voices. They detect 
and correct mi.stakes more readily, learn more 
thoroughly because the work is more enjoyable! 
In addition. Revere pays for itself many tinics 
over in valuable teaching time saved. 

Professional in every respect, yet amazingly 
low priced, the Revere Recorder is the ideal 
choice for YOUR school! Your Revere dealer 
will be happy to arrange a free demonstration, 
or write direct for complete information. 



Life-like fidelity and clarity • Full hour's 
listening on every reel * Erasable, re- 
usoble tape — may be cut and spliced 
with scissors ond Scotch Tape • Simplified 
controls • Smort, lightweight, luggage- 
style corrying case with delochable cover. 



o 





TAPE RECORDER 



REVERE CAMERA COMPANY 



CIIU'A<;<) 16 



SPEECH CLASSES 

A Revere Recorder helps im- 
prove diction and voke of 
all students. Those with 
speech impediments show 
remarkable progress. 





MODEL T-100 

Wifh microphone, radio at- 

locKment cord, 7 reels (on* ll^^^^O 

with tope), carrying case. ... I O iT 




REVERE 16mm 
SOUND MOVIE PROJECTOR 
Shown pduciilioniil films at ihrir br«t. 
Hnithl, clear ecrn^n image and fincat 
"Tliwitrp Tonr" aourKl. For atlrnt movKV, 
iiMi Kvtrrnsciv aimplo lo art up and op- 
Slipover caiM* holds accriuiorti*a, 
>-« A* A uprakcr. Complrtr unit 



i<;iis only il H« 



129950 



M MIIKR .1 • \ oil \1 K I J • I'Jil 



11 





li^ 




Color is nor only our business at Houston 
Color Film Laboratories, but an exacting 
science and a fine art. The very finest, modern 
equipment is used to assure absolute control 
during every stage of developing and printing, 
thereby reproducing true "living" colors. 
Houston technicians are color experts with a 
wealth of experience and know-how that 
is unmatched in all the world. Try Houston 
on your next job and sec the difference. 

• Developing and Printing 35MM color film 

• Duplicating prints on 3 5 MM color film 

• Processing 16MM color film 

• 35MM color film strips and slide films 



HOUSTON 



Color Film Laboratories, Inc. 

230 W. Oliie Si.. Burbank, Calif. • CH. 0-8188 

Fast, Immediate Service • Processing Color Film Exclusively 

World's largest processors of 3SMM Ansco Color Film 



REPORT ALL NEW TECHNICAL AND TRAINING FILMS TU BL:?LNESS SCREEN 

♦ A complete registry »{ all existing technical and any new pictures completed, whether for internal 

training motion pictures produced by and for busi- or oxtc^rna! use. so this listing can be maintained 

ness and industrial purposes is niaintaim-d by the fnr llir bonefit of all. Address all notices to: Index 

Editors of BusiNKSS S<.rek\. Pleas*- notify us of of Training Films. 150 K. Superior, Chicago 11.111. 



Film Sells Manufacturer a 
Million-Dollar Plant Site 

♦ .\ <liiiiiiati( iioUiiKc of ihe 
potency of film turned up in 
Canada not long ago. Accord- 
ing to .Vlr. K. L. Markoii. vice- 
president of TnK \l(>^AK<:li 
Kmtti.vg Company, his com- 
pany had been looking for a 
location to build a new plant, 
investigated some fifty cliffer- 
ent towns and the lalxir. land 
and housing conditions in each. 
During the search, someone 
showed companv ofTiciais a film, 
On To Fortune^ .sponsored by 
the Central Mortgage & Hous- 
ing Corp. and produced by 
Crawi.ky Films, both of Ot- 
tawa. The picture told very con- 
vincingly the advantages of 
Ajax. Ontario, a fully planned 
industrial cinninuriit) near To- 
ronto. 

Lpshot: .Monarch went into 
the situation in detail, liked the 
set-up and plans to invest a 
million dollars in land, build- 
ings and e(]ui|)tncnt at .\jax. 
Mr. Markon states that On To 
Fortune was a substantial fac- 
tor in persuading the company 
to make the investment. 

National Sugar's Ad Story 

♦ The .National Sigar Re- 
fining Company has taken to 
film to explain to its jobbers 
why advertising promotion is 
switching from heavy newspa- 
per schedules to television in 
most of the company's sales 
areas. 

National Sugar believes that 
with television in ten million 
homes and particularly strong 
in the east where the company's 
Jack Frost brand is a heavy 
seller, its messages, recipes and 
premium offers will score heav- 
ily in the new campaign. 

CiNEFFECTS. Inc. produced 
the 5-minute sales promotion 
message through ^ oung ik Kubi- 
cam. 

Sears Films in Production 

♦ M\R(.ii OK Time is shooting 
two films for Sears Roebkk 
& Company. Studio scenes are 
being photographed at Motion 
Picture Stages, Inc.. New York. 

Maggini K & E Vice-President 

♦ DoNXI.I) J. Maggim. who 
joined Kenyon & Eckhakdt. 
Inc., New York in l'M4. has 
been named vice-president. For- 
merly associated with publica- 
tions, he developed K & F"s 
Motion Picture Department. 
Mr. Maggini was on Movie 
Maker's N. Y. staff. 



BUSINES.S .SCREEN MAGAZINE 



• •t 



Professional IqoipmeM 



j,r Prolessionol R«olts 



For over 25 years, Mir neras have sec profes- 

sional photographic siai........^ lor the Motion Picture 

Industry. I'hcsc flawlessly designed, ruggedly con- 



tions. Today, 

ul. ' 



lay, the World's greatest films 
'liiipmeni •' 



)»m« niOHStlOMAl 



^j 



16iiim Proft- 



lom* prov«n " ' 
. (o I6fnm I 

I il O to«o> 
itogrophy 



wnn«<»Mu 



lili*ii 



^? 



Jirr.T, BNC MG 



" llOliaoro «quipm«nT of * " 

%v«It«bt« in BN(, bl<mi 
dvU to m««f vvvry rM|vir*pi« 



/ff/Yc^e// Ca^/pfera 



CORPORATIO 



666 WEST HARVARD STREET • GLENDAIB 4, CALIFORNIA • CAILI ADORISSt 'MITCAMCO- 

■ AtTIRN aiPRItlNTATIVI. TNIOOORI AlTMikN • SSI PlfTN AVINUI • NIW TOBK CltV 17 • MUIIAT Mill 1.7«3I 

' 85% cf tkt mttion pi(twr«> tlitwii in tktatrti tbrtwf k«wt fht world are filinvd witli • Mitchef 



NUMBER 3 • VOI.IMK 12 • losi 



13 




. . . . the "right" 
producer . 

How do you select the right producer t 
your film problem? 



you judge by his experience 
Pathcscope has been producing films sin 

1^(14. 




IT you judge by what he has produced 

Pathivc (ipi- has produced the finest iiiotii 
))i( tures and filmstrips of all types for Amc 
ica's top companies. 



you judge by his clients 
Pathcscope has many ; these arc a few ser\' 
repeatedly over the past two years : Americ .1 
Telephone & Telegraph Company, Westiiv. 
house Electric Corporation, RCA- Victor, Tl 
Coca-Cola Company, General Foods Co 
poration. General Electric Company, U. 
State Dept.. Standard Oil Company of Ne- 
Jersey, McGraw-Hill Book Company. 



you judge by his accomplishments 
Pathcscope's ideas and techniques have le 
manv trends. Our latest development is 



PATHESCOPE'S ARTWORl 
REARVIEW PROJECTOR 

Designed and built in our studio for moxi 
mum production effectiveness at low* 
costs. To see how it was used for A.T. & 1 
and The Coca-Cola Company, call PLozi 
7-5200. i 



A. T H E S C P E PRODUCTIONS 

The Pathescope Company of America, Inc. 
580 Fifth Avenue ■ New York City 19. N. Y. 

PLAZA 7-5 200 




Capture your audience from the first frame . . . 

The new Kodascope Pa^mnt ^o\3nA Projector 



I 



Sound movies are a potent tool for sales, training, 
and education — a wonderful entertainment medium. 
The Kodascope Pageant Sound Projector provides 
the realism in sight and sound that means convinc- 
ing performances every time with 16mm. movies. 
An improved optical system gives unusual pro- 
jection brilliance. Pictures are sharp and clear from 
corner to corner. And the Pageant's unique audio 
system and "sound focusing" control assure clear. 



authentic tones at all volume levels. 

Easy to thread and operate, the Kodascope Pag- 
eant, complete with speaker in a single case, weighs 
only 33 pounds. Rugged construction and perma- 
nent lubrication mean years of trouble-free service. 
Price — $37 5. See it at your dealer's, or write for the 
informative free booklet, "The Kodascope Pageant 
Sound Projector." Eastman Kodak Company. 
Rochester 4. N. Y. 



Price iuhject to change uithout notice. Consult your iJealer. 



AN IMPORTANT TOOL FOR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 

FOR TRAINING your employee* or talesmen. 

FOR SALFS and PROMOTION — lo *how proipctis how your 
product \\ made, how i( workt, ihe heneliu of Us use. 

FOR Hn'CATION and KNTERTAINMKNT— in factories, school*, 
churches, stores, or homes. 

Also shows silent films, and has connection for microphone or 
record player. 

BUSINESS FILMS . . . 

demonstrate, train, dramatize, sell 



r 


lASTMAN KODAK COMPANY. 
for ffofnonirrofton fi/m. 

MA Ml 


Ro(K«it«r 4. N Y *' 




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IS 



STEPS TO 
GREATER 
STEREO i 
ENJOYMENT! 



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""'l<V'r.i'''"""g ; ; ".^.", iei,.. 



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/ \ HUMSERCER SAIEJ CORP 



Dapl. BS'i I 
34 Thutylourth St , BrooHyn 32. N Y 
Please rush FREE stereo cutting and mounting 
inslfuctions Also send FREE new catalog ot 
stereo, slide, movie and datktoom accessories 

NAME •.••• 

ADDRESS 

CITY . STATE 




W KsriNt.lloi SK I'.N. I'll.M follis ahovr an' 
J. (iillxTt HiiirtI, sah's promiUiim maiiiifiiT. 
U I'slinfiliDiisc Eli'ctrir ('.itrintnitioii »j Minis- 
fifld. Ohio: Hrlly Fiinifss. film and viitfo star 
featuri'd ttn "Studio Our": and Irifihl I fw/y ( . 
Thayi-r. Jr.. Roland Riid I'rodiirlioiis. Holly- 
wood ( si-e iioti'S hrloir). 



Ri^ht Off the Reel 

You HEAR A LOT about the headaches 
and tribulations of t.v. commercials around 
the studios these days so its particularly 
refreshing to hear some of the success stories. 
One of these is certainly that of Westinghouse 
which has had a heavy demand for its series of 
34 film spots from retailers for use on local t.v. 
stations. J. Gilbert Baird. sales promotion man- 
ager of Westinghouse at Mansfield. Ohio, bad 
these produced by Roland Reed Productions of 
Hollywood, with production arranged in New 
York City. 

Betty Furness is featured in a good many of 
these spots and the blonde film star has become 
a video favorite, both with the audiences and 
the dealer family. Paul Brenson. the announcer 
on Westin^houie Studio One program, does the 
20-second "chain" breaks. There are 6 spots 
on Westinghouse refrigerators: 6 on laundry 
equipment: 4 each on ranges and roasters: 10 
on vacuum cleaners: and 4 on Westinghouse 
fans. It all adds up to a lot of selling and re- 
tailers' acceptance indicates that's just what it is. 
There's a good story on the other Wesling- 
ht)use films due in these pages next month. 
We've been filling in the lines and think it makes 
a to])-rank stor\ of both public relations and 
technical film ])roduction. 

Film I'rofirams "Do" or "Die" in tli<- Firld 
and Ui-rr (re .Some of tin' Rrasons 

■k The big opportunitN for film programs is in 
the field organizations of national manufac- 
turers or distributors. But a lot of them have 
failed ti> make the grade with regional branches 
and the reasons for these failures are well worth 
checking out for correction. 

Common failure is the equipment breakdown. 
Sound projectors or sound slidefilm etiuipmeiit 
going into branch offices or dealer salesrooms 
from head(|uarlers are a fairly big responsibil- 
ity. But national companies fighl hard for low 
(juantit) prices and often wipe out any consid- 
eration of local maintenance in tin- fii'ld or local 
instruction on operations and good showman- 
ship. A school boy can operate this equipment 



We Quote F"rom Experience 

"Vi'lierever films are shown in war plants, 
results have been most gratifying. Fre- 
i|Ur-ntl\ absenteeism decreases aixl prmluc- 
tion correspondingK rises. As long us the 
war lasts and production problems con- 
tinue. I feel that motion pictures will play 
i\ \ital |>art in meeting and beating urgently 
needed production schedules." — Rear Ad- 
miral ('.. II. IfOiKliiard. .speakinp as Chief 
oj Industrial Imrnlivi' Division. V. S. 
Navy, in World War II. 



alright but it lakes a good service outlet to put 
one back in shape at times. 

But the local a-v dealer, wisely or not, doesn't 
welcome a service call on an "import" machine. 
Ail of this could be quickly corrected by a rea- 
sonable service contract-fee arrangement that 
would reward the dealer for honest services 
honestly rendered on "running-in" and main- 
taining branch office equipment entering his 
territory. 

Other common failings are "human" elements 
such as lack of showmanship or interest on the 
part of branch managers; not "selling" the film 
l)rogram before its dumped into the field; loo 
manv trick gadgets and too much detail for an 
already busy and short-handed branch office to 
handle. None of these failings amount to any- 
thing once a branch manager discovers the 
latent powers of the medium — but he shouldn I 
be expected to try until the potential is made 
clear and desirable. 

Which is by way of telling you thai we're 
aware of these points and that they will be the 
subject of an exhaustive series in Business 
Screen which will include a national checkup 
on adequate and recognized equipment service 
stations throughout the country. It's easy to 
talk about successes in the film medium but its 
just as important to talk about shortcomings — 
or at least the shortcomings of those who don t 
hnow the rules or don't understand them. 

. . . -OHC 

♦ Angels Wanted: Unless well heeled investors 
willing to take a flyer in "the movie business ' 
can be found, look for a flock of amalgamations 
and foldings among NY's Johnny-come-Iately 
filins-for-TV producers. 

Fhkkdom Awaro Mkdm. Wiwfr .ihotrn bidotr 
is Raiduu'l (i. If olff of Uollytcood uhoai' film 
"Ma/iif Ki-y" n'<rivrd the covi-lcd medal at 
rrrent ci'remonii-s on thr IT rsl Coast. 





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HI SINESS SCREEN MA<:AZINE 



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Here's the 31 -pound "theatre-in-o-sc 
that is DeVry's answer to universal dcmant 
from education and industry for a truly port 
able, yet fully professional, 16mm sound mo 
tlon picture projector. 

Beyond its own direct use in these fields 
the versatile "DeVrylite" projector is the 
choice of designers and engineers who hove 
long sought a basic and unfailing sound one 
picture mechanism with which to create in 
numerable special devices, audio-visual dcm 
onstration, selling, testing, and teaching tools 

Opening new fields of visual presentotior 
where weight and size ore essential factors 
the "DeVrylite" mechanism delivers stability 
of performance, quality of sound, and brilli' 
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od bright picturvi and (h« "DvVry- 
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with self-contained amplifier, loud- 
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"0«Vrylit(" d*li«*ri baaulifully cU<r «nd it*«dy pic»ur«i 
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DOLLY. . . I'his VLT>>;itilL- piece of cijiiip- 
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angles. l.e\elinj; lie.ul. upon wliicli friction 
or geared heail is nu>iinteil, can liei|uickly. 
smoothly raised trom 1 i" to "'()" high, 
remaining level at all limes, lintire canti- 
lever arm re\ol\es easily on turret base fast 
or slowly. Dolly rolls smoothly, quietly, 
turns on its own axis or can be mo\ed side- 
ways. N'ery maneiiverable in tight places. 
Steel and aluminum construction provides 
maximum strength and minimimi weight. 
Top qualit\ throughout. De\eU>ped and im- 
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Maximum flexibility. Provides lens height 
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panning around the crane base, }-i() pan- 
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and adjustable friction-type turret brake. 
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A BISINESS FILM REFERENCE AND RESKAKCH I.IHKAKY AT YOUR SER\ ICE 

Write today for complete dclail.« on the Film Guide services have now Ixcii improved to meet your needs. 
Library and the Business Film Bookshelf Services Address: Film Guide I,ihrary. Business Screen, 150 
available to subscribers. These economical reference E. Superior, Chicago 11. Write today — don't delay! 



Brockway New AAAA Chairman; 
Cunningham, VanSant Honored 

* I III- AiiHTican .AsMiciatiiiii of 
Adxertising Agencies has named to 
board chairmanship Louis N. 
Brockway. executive vice president 
of Young & Huliicaiii. 

Jiihii I'. Cunningliani of Cuiining- 
liani i. Walsh was elected vice chair- 
man. The new secretary-treasurer 
is Wilbur VanSant of Vanl^ant, 
Dugdale & Company. Directors-at- 
large are William R. Baker. Jr.. of 
Benton & Bowles: B. C. Dufly of 
Ballcn. Barton. Durslitie & Osliorn; 
and K. K. ."^slvestre of Knox Reeves 
Advertising, Inc.. Minneapolis. 

President Frederic R. Gamble has 
another vear in his term of office. 

Engineer Has Big Responsibility 
In Defense, Golden Tells SMPTE 

* i he DiolJKii |iii tare engineer has 
a large res|)otisil)ility to both essen- 
tial industr\ and the rearmament 
program, the SMPTE was told at 
the opening luncheon of the 69th 
semiannual convention in New York 
by Nathan D. Goi-DEN. director of 
the motion picture-photographic 
products division of the National 
Production Authority. Golden's di- 
vision has the job of providing the 
supplies of motion picture and other 
photographic niaterials for defense 
and industry. Peter Mole, head of 
the -Mole-Richardson companv. is 
SMPTK president. 

Cleveland Film Festival June 14 
Will Award "Oscars" in 10 Groups 

* The June 14 Cleveland Film Fes- 
tival, fourth annual event of the 
Cleveland Film Council, will award 
"oscars' to the winners in ten cate- 
gories of 16mm productions. Presi- 
dent Elizabeth Hunady and Chair- 
man Leslie E. Frye announced. May 
25 was the deadline set for entries 
to be listed on the printed program. 

The ten categories and the selec- 
tion committee chairman of each 
are: Sales promotion and public re- 
lations. Prof. Vance Chamberlain: 
civil defense, safety and fire fight- 
ing. Lt. John Berichon: personal 
training. Paul Smith: mental and 
emotional health. Samuel Whit- 
man; travel and recreation. Mildred 
McKav; industrial relations. 
l!harles A. McBride; adult educa- 
tion. Mrs. Florence Craig; religion. 
Prof. W. Marlin Butts: cultural 
arts. Ronald l)a\ : and education, 
William E. Kofron. 

For additional information re- 
garding the event, to be held at 
Fenn College, write the Council, 
care of the Cleveland Public Li- 
brary. 

Boston, nieaiiuhile. is holding its 
first Film Festival on Mav 26. 



18 



mSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



\ 



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\ 



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PRODU 



[NS, lat: 



15 EaVt 53rd STRfEt 



NEW YORK 22 



MURRAY HILL 8-7830 



Modern's Standards of Performance 
for Sponsored Film Distribution 

' 1^ HE HASH! operatinjc principles and services whieli Modern Talkinfi Picture 
Service. Inc.. and its 27 rcfiional 16nini film exclianjies appl> in tin- distrilin- 
tiun of iMori- tlian one liiindrcd major >ponsored film programs have lircn dcM-l- 
ope<l durin<: more tlian 15 years of experience. Primarily we pro\ ide (iiialily and 
precision in each of the following services: 

1. Promotion of the film to selected categories of equipped audiences. 

2. Bookings to the exact type of audiences specified by the sponsor. 

3. Adequate advance notice to the sponsor giving complete audience names, per- 
son in charge and mailing address of booking arrangements. 

4. A properly signed report card for each booking. 

5. A monthly statement itemizing attendance figures for each booking in terms of 
men, women, boys, girls, and totals. 

6. A monthly statement showing total bookings, total showings and total attend- 
ances of men, women, boys, and girls, arranged alphabetically by states. Cur- 
rent, previous and cumulative over-all totals are also reported. 

7. Special reports of numbers of bookings and attendances in various classes of 
audiences showing attendance averages for each separate class. 

8. Periodic reports to the sponsor giving audience reaction. 

9. Proper care and physical handling to insure maximum life of prints. 

10. Responsibility for print inventories. 

1 1. Audience confidence in Modern inspired by the excellence of its programs and 
service. 

12. Economy of operation — securing more bookings per print per month — al- 
lowing better market coverage with lower capital investment in prints. 

These standards and services will increase the effectiveness of your film program whether 
directed to internal, dealer, mass consumer audiences, or other specialized fields — with 
proven economies. Specific details about our services are available on your request. 



MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, INC. 



TkUINC 

mnum 

SIIVICC 



4S lOCKiriLLIR ^LAZA • NEW YORK 30, N. Y. • CIrcU A-OtlO 
149 lAST ONTARIO «TRIIT • CHICAOO 11. III. • SUpsrIar 7.05Rt 
• 13 SOUTH FIOWER STRUT • LOS ANOIIES 17, CAIIF. • MAdlten 9-3121 



Canadian Film Awards Winners 
Congratulated by Mary Pickford 

♦ \\ iriinr~ iif llii- Tliiiil \riiiu.il 
(ianadiuii liliii Awar<l> wi-rt- Imn- 
uri-d at the |)ri-sciilatii>iis April 22iiii 
in the Odcon theatre at Ottawa, 
with Mary I'ickford, Canada's fon-- 
most coiitriliution tu the worhl <<f 
the screen, participating in tlie cen- 
monies. 

Winning first place in the non- 
theatrical division was Feelings oj 
Depression, Canadian National Film 
Board production directed hy Stan- 
ley Jackson. The theatrical winner 
was the CNFBs Apres le Riijinc. 
Kon Weynian director. The Quehcc 
Government recipient of a special 
award for "excellent photography 
under diflicult conditions" was if in- 
ter Anplinfi in Comfort, produced 
by Maurice Montgrain. 

Other special awards went to 
The Fifchl — Science against Can- 
cer, C.NFB production directed l)\ 
Morten Parker and selected fur 
■■pr<)ficien('\ in all elements of film 
art"; Family Tree. CNFB entry in 
the animation field; and Silzmarhs 
the Spot, comedy produced for 
Warner Brothers by the Associated 
Screen .News. Ltd. 

Hoiinrable mention in the non- 
theatrical class was voted to The 
Oyster Man, sponsored by the De- 
partment of Fisheries and directed 
by Julian Biggs of the CNFB. An 
amateur film entry of the Univer- 
sit\ of Toronto Film Society alsi> 
was given honorable mention. 

D. R. Michener was chairman of 
the committee for the awards, which 
are sponsored bv the Canadian As- 
sociation for Adult Education and 
the 50 organizations it represents. 

RCA Custom Records Moves N.Y. 
Office to 630 Fifth Avenue 

♦ KCA Victors (astom Kki.ohi> 
Sales Division has moved to new 
offices on the 32nd floor of the In- 
ternational Building. Rockefeller 
Center. Address is 630 Fifth Ave- 
nue. -New York 20. 

Custom Record's Orders and Serx - 
ice Section will be located at RC \ 
Victor's New York recording stu- 
ilios. 155 East 24lh Street. 

There is no change in the address 
of RCA Victor Custom Record of- 
fices in Chicago and llulKwDod. 

Chicago Film Moves to New Studios 

♦ rile CllKAUO 1 ll.M MILIIOS nl 

Chicago Film Laboratory. Inc., is 
now quartered in modern new stn- 
dios at .% East Su|)erior St.. Chi- 
cago 1 1. 111. 

Brulatour Announces New Offices 

♦ Niw olliri - anil \\arili<iil>e have 
been opened by J. E. Brulatour. 
Inc.. at 60MI No. I'ulaski Rd.. Chi- 
cago .30, III. 



20 



BUSINESS SCREEN MA«;.\ZINK 




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Apr 



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1951 



,,. Kern ^^f « ^.^esstng Corporation 
Peerless ^^J^ ^ ^ 
165 yest A6th Street. 

Dear Sir: experience with the^^sVc 

dltlon 88 w^e" ^^^ffered us* *^nt 

that the company offeree peerless treatment 

tr light re-julred for <M j^, "^" 'r- oroj^""" "«' 

-^ »'rr ruTr'Xi" ™" nrgr-;er «r.tche, .- „, 

Tnbrlcatlon, aii _, .. On our large peerless t-reai- 

iuori^o ecratcnes. ^' v* actionable. '^^ ,, „ »n nrojec- 

treated fi^" ^^^^ ^^^y yours, 

^,0 cm ^SIC H^lX COBPCUTlC. 

Chief Projectionlet 
CHABLES MUlXH5l:~ 



ERLESS FILM PIOCESSING CORPOR 

l«S WIST 4«TH STREET. NEW YORK 19. 



Here It Is. . . 




13 POUNDS 



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Easier portabiliu- • Less weight • Less bulk • Lower price 
Up to the minute engineering • Geared for big production 
— any quantity' • Audience capacit^• up to 100 • 100-watt 
SVE projector (150 watts optional) • One speed, 33-1/3 
RPM (three speeds optional) • Plays microgroove and stand- 
ard records up to 1 6-inch • Sound evenly distributed — every 
syllable easy to understand • No fabric or other sound dead- 
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phone assembly — the only practical assembly ever devised 
for sound slide-film machines • Projector most conveniently 
located, making pull-cords unnecessary • Image elevated 
without throwing record out of level • An AC machine but 
no immediate damage if plugged into DC • No catch to come 
loose and collapse machine on floor • Controls at your finger 
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Since 193" we have made the finest 
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Be sure to ask for full details before 
you buy sound slide-film machines. 



O. J. AAcCLURE 

TALKING 
PICTURES 

1115'A W. Woshington Blvd. 
Chicago 7 Canal 6-4914 



(Carries eight thin records up to 
12-inch, and eight films. Records 
protected against warping, break- 
l\ ing and dirt. Eight films carried 
ii^^cure against damage. 



Projects picture up to "2 inches 
wide, hut has huilt-in shadow- 
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A screen without a shadow-box 
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THE ONLY COMPLETE LINE 
ON THE MARKET 

We manulacture everything from this 
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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



He rei o^r C2se on QiM-lT/ 



t ai-importent pk^ ^e^iure of 



COLUMBIA 

SLIDEdDFILM 

TRANSCRIPTIONS 




COLUMBIA TRANSCRIPTIONS, A DIVISION OF COLUMBIA RECORDS, INC. Or 



New York: 799 Seventh Avenue, Circle 5-7300 

Los Angeles: 8723 Alden Drive, BRadshaw 2-5411 

Chicogo: Wrigley Building, 410 Michigan Avenue, WHllehall 6000 



'. 'ft-, ^, ^'-■^■(M »»*i"T>:»( 



NUMBER 3 • VOI.l MK 1 J • l'».JI 



23 



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"A Few Fads 
About Audio" 






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'" v.ave been fereaUy^ ^^,, 

v.«r9 o^ ^^^ « ''^a^^® ted that a «°'^ 
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\' b and did r.^-^^ praise^°^JlUation ^^ 

J° - ♦v^at ffl8^y„ _ «t)ec: 






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AUDIO PRODUCTIONS, INC 

PRODUCERS OF MOTION PICT IRES 

630 NINTH AVI.NUK • FILM CKNTER B L I L U 1 .\ G • NEW YORK. .\.V. 



24 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Special Defense Report 

IS'ationul Security Indiislrial Associatiiiii 

-K -K -K 

TWO iiutioiially-ri-ci)pnizi'(l leaders in (mt- 
.-.uiiiel training are urging manufacturers 
to be as much concerned in the present 
crises with training programs as they are with 
prolileins of mati-rials. plant expansion and re- 
toohng. 

Lieutenant General Itoliert \\". Harper, roin- 
manding general. Air Training Command, which 
is now engaged in the greatest known military 
training program in the world, told .VM) mem- 
bers of the National Sci urily Industrial Associa- 
tion at their Detroit conference on training that 
"starting from scratch in World War II, fac- 
tory training in the later stages of that con- 
flict attained magnificent heights." 



••lii 



I- Our I'reciou- Klenient' 



"Tremendous progress was made. ' Gen. Har- 
per said, "but it required time. And ttiday 
TIMK is our precious element as we seek to- 
gether to slop the aggressors in the Kremlin and 
thwart a distorted dogma which has enslaved 
millions of people in Europe and Asia." 

General Harper shared the NSIA program 
on industrial and military training for defense 
with Jainisi>n Handy, president of The Jam 
Hanilv Organization. The earlier effective train- 
ing programs are started, warned Handy, the 
better oil the United States will be from a pro- 
duction standpoint and from a standpoint of 
military proficiency. 

General Harper as director. Armed Forces 
Division, Office of Military Government, held 
the "hot spot" in the European cold war be- 
fore and during the Berlin Airlift. He said that 
the Air Training Command now has a person- 
nel of nearly 2.50.(K1(). with about 10(>.(MM1 stu- 
dents in the various technical training courses. 

Last September. General Har|)er said, the 
Air Force had 17 stations in the Training 
Command. Today there are 30 across the na- 
tion, with new stations In-ing added regularly 
to permit the Training Command to accomplish 
its mi.ssion under tlie 95-group program. 

('iting an example of training expansicm. Gen- 
eral Harper said that the Biloxi, Mi.ss.. elec- 
tronics and radar center, which had a person- 
nel of l(>.iKM) a few months ago, now has nearly 
double that nund>er, and is increasing its fa- 
cilities rapidly. 

Urge Early Consideration of Training 

"The more widespread the early considcra- 
tiim of the equipment in the training aspect 
becomes liv manufacturer and the militar\ 
the designer and the user the closer we ap- 
proach our full measure of successful mutual 
contribution to the total of our nation's armed 
strength," General Har|H'r concluded. 

"M Day may come or it may not come, but 
if it comes it will prcdiably come sudilenly," 
said llandv. whoso experience in job training 
covers two V^'orld \('ars. "It takes time to plan 
n good training operation, no matter what that 
training operation is. and it takes more time 
to gel a good training program going. 

"When we run into a manpower shortage 




Dktroit Conference Dinner of the ,\ational Security Industrial Association at the Hotel Hook- 
Cadillac. Speakers were Major General Orvii R. Cook: Air Materiel Command and Harry K. Clark, 
executive vice chairman of the Munitions Hoard. H. F. I ickers. president of I ickers. Inc., pre- 
sided. Charles F. Ketterinp was toastmaster. 



Have We Time Eiiinijili lo Tniiii 

l.NDl.VIKIAL AM) MII.H AK^ 1.I-. VDKHS MKKTlNt, IN Dl. I Kol I 
STRESS GRAVE HXZVKDS OF LO.Nt; DELAY IN SKILL TRAINING 



u 



in production in this counlrv. it's going to 
come suddeni). We are going lo reach the 
point where we find that the supply of trained 
workers has run out that there isn't any more. 

"It is a practice in many organizations to 
leave consideration of trained manpower vir- 
tually to the last thing, overlooking, in preoc- 
cupation with pr<d)lems of plant and problems of 
suppiv and problems of tooling, that we have 
to have Iraineil manpower. 

"We have had the opportunity lo observe 
many successful training programs and many 
unsuc<essful programs. But most of thus*- we 
have observed »iTe neither good nor bad 
they were partly one and partlv another. All 
of us know so much more than unv one <if us. 
\\V s<-e again and again losllv mistakes licing 
re|M-aled and we s«v jM-ople working on prob- 
lems which have alreadv tn-en solved bv others. 
And so there aicunmlates a mmis*- of great loss 
becaus«' we do not etTertuallv pool our exjicri- 
ence nor Ikim' iIh- opportunilv to learn from 
others. 

(irrateni Iai" I- In I ran>nii>«iiin 

"In our view, the greatest etononiic lo»s in 
American industrv is the evaporation of ex- 
(MTienie. tile inediriencv in the transnii.osion of 
instructions, the 'line drop' thol occurs in the 
Voltage and «ni|>eragr with which great under- 



takings are carried out on the |>eriplierv of an 
organization, whether it is engaged in a dis- 
tribution, or a production, or a military opera- 
tion. 

"Under the stress of World War II we 
evolved many efle«-tive methods of doing a 
training Job faster and doing it at less cost in 
li-rnis of e<)uipmeril and money. I.et us take 
cognizance nou. iM-fore il is too late, of the 
lessons we have learne<i. 

"Training of Trainers More lni|Hirlunl" 

"In any critical training operation, it is 
quite possible to implement, make efli-clive. un- 
qualilietl trainers, but we must «lop using them 
tvhilr they remain unqualified. .\ l>etter train- 
ing job can Ik* done if priMluction men ran 
Ik- taught to leach and teachers can l>e laughl 
to do a job and understand thai j<d> well enough 
from a |>rrforniance stanil|Miinl to command the 
respc<-| of the men who are l>eing shov»n. We 
can do a U'tler job by training selected 
trainers and rerognixing thai the training of 
trainers is even more important than the train- 
ing of trainers." 

The training program wa« part of a two-dav 
eonferrnre »|Hiii»4>rrd bv the NSIA with the 
coo|irralion of ihe Chrysler Ct>qK)ration. the 

ICONTIKUBD ON THE FOLLOWING PACF.) 



NUMBER 3 



\ (H.l MK 12 • 1951 



2S 



Have We Time lo Train? 

(CONTIMIED FR(»M THE PRECEDING PACE I 
Ford Motor Company. General Motors, and The 
Jam Handy Organization. Training aids and 
devices in use l>y the Navv and the Air Force 
were floHri to Detroit for the sessions at the 
Jam nand\ |iliint in that eity. 

Ileiir) Ford Cite- I'rodiiilion I'riilili'iii 
"^ou can't asseiiilile tanks and autonioliili's 
on anv Mne that has \et heen devised." Menrv 
Ford II. president of the Ford Motor ('onipaiiv. 
told the industrial executives. ""Cutting hack 
automobile production ."30 per cent doesn't actu- 
ally free any major part of our facilities for 
defense work." 

At the coiiferi-nce dinner at the Book-Cadillac 
Hotel Major Ceneral (1rval K. Cook, director 
of procurement and industrial planning. Air 
Materiel Command, said that electronic fire con- 
trol apparatus is the most critical item on the 
-Air Force list of essentials, and that deficiencies 
in this field threaten the entire air defense pro- 
gram. "The (pialit> of the elelronic equipment 
we are getting is not good." he said. 

General Cook also asserted that "the shortage 
of machine tools presents the gravest threat to 
the expanding aircraft engine program." 

Industrial and Military Leaders Present 
The \SIA meetings were attended bv a large 
Armed Forces delegation, including John F. 
Floherg. Assistant .Secretary of the Navy for 
Air: Lieut. Gen. S. J. Chambcrlin. command- 
ing general. Fifth Army: Rear Admiral W. Mc- 
L. Hague, chief of industrial relations for the 
Navy: .Maj. Gen. H. A. Johnson. Tenth Air 
Force: Rear .Admiral J. A. Snackenberg. as- 
sistant chief of the .\avy"s Bureau of Ordnance: 
Brig. Gen. John K. Christmas. Chief. Procure- 
ment Group, War Department General Staff; 
Maj. Gen. Floyd L. Parks. Chief of Informa- 




Iiii|i()rtatnc (»f Field Maiiiteiiaiife 
of Equipiiieiil Kevealetl in Survey 



Lieut. General Kdhkkt W. Mari-er. cnmmaml- 
ing general. Air Training Command and Jami- 
son Handy, president. The Jam Handy Organ- 
ization, at Detroit Iraininii conference of the 
\alional Security Industrial Association. 

lion. Deparlment of llie .Army: and Brig. Gen. 
David J. Crawford, commanding general. Ord- 
nance Tank-.Automotive Center. 

Speakers on the engineering program at 
Chrysler Corporation were Kear Admiral Paul 
K. Phil, of the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics, 
and J. C. Zeder, vice president and director of 
engineering and research. At the General Motors 
Proving Grounds. L. C. Goad, executive vice 
president, greeted the delegates. Speakers on 
a GM program on testing and proving opera- 
lions were Maj. Gen. Christmas and Charles A. 
Chayne. GM vice president in charge of en- 
gineering. 58" 

Editor's Note: The importance of the preced- 
ing feature report cannot be overestimated. An 
example of preparedness and training resources 
existing within this industry, it provides a real 
challenge to all business serving the defense 
l)rodu<li()n program. 



IndL'STRIAL Executives and Military attending the training conference of the .\ational Security 
Industrial Association in the studio buildings of The Jam Handy Organization in Detroit. 




* A dual survey begun last month by the Edi- 
t<irs of Bi siNES.s Screen on the related problems 
of fiehl ntili/ation of training and [ironuitional 
films li\ national and regional business organ- 
izalions. trade associations, and the militarv has 
already em|)hasized the importance of audio- 
visual equipment repair and maintenance facili- 
ties as one critical breakdown point where such 
programs most fre(|uenllv fail. 

Publication in the next issue of the first com- 
l)relieMsi\e check on all bonafide e(|uipment 
service stations available to industry is timed 
to coincide with summer overhaul and checkup 
pi'riod. But it will also provide industrv with a 
contaci chart of real value. 

-Allhougli efjuipmerit maintenance is onh one 
l>hase of the problem, it is handicapped by mass 
buying habits which fail to allow for field serv- 
ice arrangements. Manufacturers generallv agree 
that such should be uniform |)rocedure but it 
rarely is. Discussion of this point will be in- 
<lu(Ipd in the survey report. |f 



Railroad Safety for Children 

Sponsor: The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
Company. 

Title: The Happy Locomotive, motion 
slidefilm. color, produced by Unililms. 
Inc. 

■¥■ This is part of the B & O's expanded 
safety campaign begun two years ago. 
After evaluating long term results from a 
safety program operated for forty years, 
B & O in 1949 decided to experiment with 
modern techniques of human communica- 
tions to see if the company could reduce 
still further the waste that every injury 
represents. 

During 1949, the employee injury rate 
was reduced 25' f and continued progress 
was made in 1950. At the same time other 
phases of the program were aimed at the 
grade crossing problem and at children. 

Children, naturally fascinated by rail- 
road activities, cause many accidents by 
trespassing, vandalism and using railroad 
property as a play ground. To combat 
this, B & police olTicers have been doing 
preventive education work in the schools 
along the railroad's right-of-way in thirteen 
states. Last spring a story book was dis- 
tribul<(l by the police officers to nearly 
250.000 boys and girls. The railroad police 
department found that as a result of the 
book and talks given in assemblies juvenile 
trespassing and vandalism were almost 
eliminated in former troublesome areas. 

The Happy Locomotive is an extension 
of this campaign. The B & expecU to 
show it to several hundred thousand chil- 
dren this year- -and to many of their par- 
ents as well. B & O police officers will pre- 
sent the film showings. ^ 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



I 



Hcrr's ti (riuul "hisurdtirt'" Program 
for Film niiil EiitiiiiiUfHt Sidci-ss 

•♦f How to pet iiiaximum field utilization of 
audio-visual equipment and films of Standard 
Oil I Indiana I was the ohjeetive of a fuli-da\ 
workshop on operation and maintenaner, and a 
special clinic on both productions and equip- 
ment, at a four-weeks "blood and sweat" train- 
ing course which iiroiifilit into Chicago 32 ad- 
vertising and puiiiii- relations representatives 
from 26 fields, for indoctrination in every detail 
of their jobs. 

The overall program, in which "adpreps" of 
three subsidiaries and the Whiting refinerv also 
participated, gave the publicity representatives 
a busy month of instruction and contact with 
the press, radio, television, sj)cakers" bureaus 
and specialized programs, while the advertising 
men concentrated on product campaigns, indus- 
trial, fleet and farm ad media. 

Roth groups were brought together for inten- 
sive study of film programs and the handling 
of equipment for them. 

Speakers Discuss Meeting Problems 

The clinic on film showings had speakers 
from the field discuss sources of film materials 
and how to evaluate the aims of various types 
of meetings, present suggestions for successful 
promotion of films at public gatherings and em- 
ployees' meetings, and explain the mechanics of 
providing films and equipment. Otto H. Coelln. 
Jr.. editor and publisher of the Business Screen 
Magazine, was the final speaker. 

O. H. Peterson, production manager — sales, 
educational, promotion and training materials, 
who acted as moderator for this session, was 
also in iharge of the one-day workshop on op- 
eration and maintenance of audio-visual e(|uip- 
ment. 

Maximum distribution of the company's films 
and the buildirig of public goodwill are largely 
dependent uj)<)n how effectively the productions 
are shown, and the aim of the workshop was to 
perfect the qualifications of each field repre- 
sentative in the operation and maintenance of 
the equipment in use by personnel in his field. 

Pergonal lii>lnii'tiiin <in Kqiiipnient 

The program was set up to put each man at 
the clinic to work with the equipment itself, 
under the supervision of an instructor, this di- 
rect training supplemented with a kit including 
instruction books on the products, and diagrams 
and charts on their utilization. 

The day was divided into eight periods of 50 
minutes, six of them s<-,«sions of classes called 
stations. By rotation all six were attended by 
each man. Croups were limited to five men to 
|)ermit individual instruction. Repres«'ntalive9 of 
the HeN rv Corp. and the Socielv for Visual 
Kducation coo(>erateil with Mr. I'elerson in or- 
ganizing the training classes, wliiih went into 
session after an opening general period in which 
the objectives were outlined and the instruction 
books issued. 

Subjects of the class<'s or stations included 
maintenance and op<'ration of I6inm motion pi< - 
ture proje<'lor» and amplifier-, the .'{,3mm slide- 
strip projector, amplifier and rc<-ord-playing 
equipment, and showmanship in projection. 

Station Nn. 1. ""Maintenance of the 16mm 



CUCTOUC* 




(.I.IMt; I'kiii.kvms In \i ihis ( /«/) /<>/// tiinous /)/»•> o/ nuninn /nclurf ri/uipnifiit in tnni/Hiny use 
on display; (lop ri^lil) members of the clinic staff included (I. to r.l Jack Pollers, Kalman S/Mrlle- 
tich. Max Klein ami {('. ('.. Del'ry. president, Drfrv Corporation : Melvin Guthrie, Sl'E; Frank 
Rausclier. Mariin Paarman, l)el'r\: and (). 11. Peterson. Standard Oil ('.omf>an\. I belou left) Mr. 
Guthrie demonstrates sliilefilm projection; (right) Frank Rauscher, 16mm pointers. 

Better Film Utilization in the Field 

STANDARD OF INDIANA HOLDS MODKI. WOKkSHOP FOK FIELD STAFF 



Motion Picture Projector." Instructor, Frank 
Hau.scher. DeVry Corp. 

A 16mm projector had been placed for each 
man. The ""student" first cleaned and oiled the 
equipment according to directions, after which 
came work with the projwtor in general and 
demonstratior of solutions of field maintenance 
problems. 

Station No. 2. "Operation of the 16mm Mo- 
tion Picture Projector." Instructor, Marvin 
Paarman, I)e\ rv Corp. 

Setting up and getting a good picture and 
clear sound reproduction was the job of the 
class on operation. .\t the In-ginning of each 
|>eriod the instructor disrupted the sound and 
|iii'ture presentation by simulating ciinunon field 
diflic'ullies for the trainee to overiome. 

Learn Mmiil Ml 1% pe- nf M.irliiiii-> 

Station No. 3. "O|»-ration and Maintenance 
of the 16mm Motion Picture Amplifier." In- 
structor, Jack Powers, I)e\ rv Corp. 

Powers o(H-ned each s«*s.sii>n on amplifiers bv 
des<ribing their construction and op«>ration and 
pointing out the requirements of maintenaner. 
Kach trainee then demonstrated with the equip- 
ment a.ssigned him. 

Station No. 4. "The 3.=>mm Slide-Strip Pro- 
jector." Instructor, Melvin Guthrie, ScM-ietv for 
\ isual F'ducalion. Inc. 

Pnqier setup and usage of the 35mni slide- 
«trip projector were shown by Cuthrie in intro- 
ducing his subject. (!are, cleaning and field 
inaintrnanre instruction followe*!. The "adprrp"" 
then took over. 



Station No. 5. "The 3.Smm Sound-Slidefihn 
Amplifier and the Record Playing EquipmcnL" 
Instructor. Max Klein, a-v consultant. ('hi< ago. 

The am|>lifier and record playing ecpiipment 
were explainetl by the instructor, after which 
the trainee was directed to repeat selected opera- 
tions. 

"Sliowinan.-bip" Is a Key Factor 

Station No. 6. "Showmanship in Projec- 
tion." Instructor. K. SjM-lletiih. I)e\ rv Corp. 

A semi-lecture pres<'nlation of a nund>er of 
subj«H-ls was made by the instructor in the 
showmanship class, with fretjuent references to 
printed material and demonstrations with the 
equipment. Among the topics were projettion 
«creens. Iens«'^, [>ublic address s\ stems, micro- 
phones, rewinding antl care ami cleaning of 
film. ri>om s<-tup for the most favorable audi- 
ence reaction, and acoustics. 

At the eighth and final sejoion the instnirton 
as a panel answered queslions. Chairman Pe- 
lerson. who had introduced the clinic wilh the 
-tatrnient that by the end of ihe day it wa« hiq>etl 
each field man would have thorough knowledge 
of equipment and the care of it. summarized re- 
sult.*, and the "adpreps" agreed that they now 
jtossessetl the "know-how" to get the mo»| out 
of their a-v programs. 

■"Long vears of experience." sav« Mr. Peter- 
son. "ha\e proven the value of thorough indoc- 
trination and training in every phase of the 
audio-visual media." This a-v rlinic phone of 
the Standard Oil public relations eduralional 
program most certainly achieved thai aim. |^ 



Mi.MBtK 3 • VOLIMK i: • 1951 



27 



KMIM.OYKK r.OMMI NIC M IONS \l\ TIIK SCKKKN IS M V \ \(; K M KNT ASSET 

Piaclical lliiils for Hani "Movie Day" 

93% '>l" \I< OV Mil I WOKkKHS I'KKIKK W KKM.Y FILM SHOWINGS 



■¥■ Tin- iiHixif being slmwn was exlrfiiu-iy in- 
tcrcsliiif; ami liie nu-ii iluln'l want In li'UM-. At 
lilt' saiiif linu", llio\ tliilii'l want to lie lato for 
work and some of tlieni were constantly look- 
ing up al till- lar{!<' iloik on the wall. It was 
iirarl\ 2:l-7 I'M and time for them to ileparl 
fill tliiir Work areas in the mill. SliortK before 
2:.S(I I'M the |(ielure on the screen faded and 
the sound slopped. The mill workers, who had 
been watehing the movie in the cafeteria at the 
MuMiinuin Company of America plant in La- 
fa\elle. Indiana, (piiikly rose from their tables 
and mo\e(l toward the mill areas. The\ had 
-eeii llie first half of a very entertaining movie, 
and they knew that they could return the next 
afternoon before going to work to see the last 
half. 

Tliev Keep the Li^bt- Turned On 

There was no projector in sight during the 
show. The full color movie was projected from 
the rear onto a translucent screen. The image 
was clear and sharp. All ceiling lights were 
turned on. except those located just above the 
screen. The four windows nearest the screen 
were covered, but half pulled shades on the 
others admitted the bright sunlight. 

Most of the men who had just left to go to 
WKrk al A o'clock ha<l been on hand when the 
movie started twenl\ minutes earlier. A sign 
near the screen told them that they could see 
the first half of the n)otion picture that after- 
noon and the last half the following afternoon. 
.'\ large poster displaved where the cafeteria line 
forms annotniced the movie to be shown the 
following week. 

Showings Before 3 O'clock Shift 

Movies having a running time of more than 
twentv minutes are previewed on Thursday 
morning. \ good breaking point is picked, and 
the first part of the picture is shown that same 
afternoon to workers patronizing the cafeteria 
before going to work at 3:00 P.M. The last half 
of the picture is shown on Friday afternoon, 

Rkar Scrkkn I'ro.ik<:tion fiives hrifiltl. clear 
imtifie al Alma's l.ajayellr. Indiana plant. 



and a repeat pcrbirmaiKc is given on Monday 
and Tuesda\ so thai men working shifts will be 
able to sec it at one lime or another. 

On Friday the entire picture is shown during 
the no<m lunch )H*riod. patronized mostly by 
ollice persomiel. A repeat |)crformance is given 
al the same lime on Mondav in the belief that 
some people eating a complele meal during the 
lunch period may not be able to give the movie 
full allciition the first time. 

If a movie has a running liini- of less than 
Iwciit) minutes, it is not split. The entire pic- 
ture is then shuun on MondaN and Fridav after- 
no<ins. 

In addition to tra\eiogues and documentaries, 
adventure, educational, geographical, safety and 
sports movies are shown. Most of these films 
are obtained on a free loan basis (sponsored 
films via Modern Talking Picture Service, Inc.) 
and transportation is the onlv cost involved. 
Sports films are usuallv the most popular. In 
fact, the first time a World Series film was shown 
two years ago the cafeteria ran out of food dur- 
ing the noon hour. They hadn't prepared for 
so iiianv baseball fans. 

Poll Shows Employee Preferences 

The program was tried out for a few months 
while adjusting the home-made rear projecting 
e(niii)mciit. Near the end of the year a poll was 
conducted to determine how the employees liked 
the idea. Everyone wanted it to continue. 87% 
liked color better than black and white. 93% 
wanted weekly showings. 4'/( thought every 
other week was often enough, and 3', sai<l they 
would be satisfied with one showing jjer month. 
50'( liked sports pictures best and 45% pre- 
ferred travelogues. 

A regular 16 mm. sound projector is used to 
project the image through a hole in a wooden 
box. onto a front surfaced mirror. The mirror 
reflects the image onto a translucent screen, the 
back side of which is sheltered against light. 
Several different materials were tried out for the 
screen, and the best one was found to he \cllum 

F^MI'I.o^KK Cakktkkia is the scvne oj these week- 
ly film shouinfis iihicli uorkers like. 




tracing paper, which is inexpensive and can be 
changed as often afe iiecessar\. The vellum is 
treated with a solution to increase its transpar- 
ency before it is stretched i>\er the frame. 

If the room isn't too large, llie s|)eaker gen- 
erally used with the projector may be satisfac- 
tory. In Alcoa's setup at Lafayette, the cafe- 
teria was already equipped with six speakers 
and these are being employed to give a very 
distinct, overall distribution of sound. 

At the present time the screen being uscil is 
41"x30". However, tests are now being made 
and a 72" x 54" screen may be u.sed if a bright 
picture can be obtained. But until the larger 
screen is installed, the employees at the Alumi- 
num Company of America plant in I,afa\ette, 
Indiana will continue to enjoy weekly movies 
in the cafeteria at a very nominal cost to the 
company. jff 



Orfianizing Our Medical Resources 
to Meet Disaster Emergencies 



Sponsor: The American Medical Association. 
Title: They Also Serve. 17 min., sound, pro- 
duced by The Jam Handy Organization. Inc. 

"¥■ Events cast their shadows before, and some- 
times new developments make all the more 
timely a film of an earlier date. The Washing- 
ton hearings ])recipitated by the MacArlhur epi- 
sode undoubtedly have rendered the public more 
conscious of war potentials and tragedies. They 
Also Serve, made in 1949, was intended to en- 
courage doctors, through their local organiza- 
tions, to organize health and medical services 
to meet any national emergencies or disasters, 
in coo|>eration with governmental agencies. 

The production was not conceived as a train- 
ing film but could become the introduction to 
a future series detailing technics of specialized 
functions for physicians, hospital staffs, allied 
groups, civic administrators and community or- 
ganizations. 

As a motivation film, then, 7"/m^ Also Serve, 
made for the A.M. A. with the help of a grant 
from the Becton-Dickinson Foundation, opens 
with library footage of a number of national 
disasters. It shows a group of doctors discussing 
the professions responsibility in preparedness 
of health ser\ices. They agree that a master 
plan is essential, integrated into state and com- 
munity programs. 

The film brings out the need of organization 
to meet the following situations: mass casualty 
treatment, continuing care of the sick, oral sur- 
gical and nursing services, restoration of milk, 
food and water supply, communicable diseas<' 
control, provision of blood and blood deriva- 
tives, an emergency system for sewage disposal, 
and insect and rodent elimination. 

In preparation of the film, which is being 
shown by the A.M. A. to doctors only, the pro- 
ducers had the technical advice of leaders ol 
ill.' l{<d Cross, the U.S. Publi< Health Ser\ ice 
and .\..M..\. departments, under tlic chairman- 
ship of Col. W. L. Wilson, MC, Office of the 
Surgeon General. Library footage was from the 
I .S. .'\rmy Pictorial Service and the (Chemical 
Cor|)s. the Navy, the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Co., British Information Services and 
the American Red Cross. R' 



28 



Bl'SINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




t 



f»l 



1^ »' trL' 



lifl rmiiloyees, jamilies and jriends ihrong Chkafio's Inlernalional Amphitltenlrf hi M-e "liig Idea' 



SWIFT & COMPAiNY PKKMIKRES "BIG IDEA'' 

last JiidiiMK (' Hoars Freedom's' Riiio 



TMK PROJKCTION „f ihe new Swift & 
(l<>ni|)any iiiution picture Bi/i Idea to sotnc 
i>i the largest audiences in commercial film 
hisli)r\ is under way in the I iiited States aixl 
Canada. 

Hif! Idea, pruduced by Vi'ildiiip Picture i'm- 
duclions. Inc., Chicago, is a graphic comparison 
between I . S. liberties and life behind the '"iron 
curtain" as seen by a visitor from E.istern 
Europe. The Bip Idea is that in the I'nited 
States people and indi\idiial freedoms rank 
al>o\e the importance of the state. 

Chicago Showings Fill Vnipliilliealrc 

In Chicago. Bi/; Idea was shown to Swift em- 
ployes, their families and friends at the huge 
International .Vmphitheatre, scene of the Inter- 
national Livestock .Show and major sporting 
events. A total of 2J5.2I.S persons attended four 
showings, with a high of 7,'M2 at the innclud- 
ing jH'rformance. 

\V. M. Bastable, chief of the Swift film divi- 
sii.n. arranged for a U)x28 foot porous screen 



(see cut), larger than us«'(l in conventional 
theatre pn>jection, to be hung on guv wires 
from overhead girders in the central auditorium. 
Shipment of the oversize screi-n from Detroit 
posed special transportation prolilcms for Amer- 
ican Railway Express. 

Fi|iiipnient Assures Quality Performance 

Length of projection was 220 feet and was 
accomplished by two .35 mm, projectors 
e(|uipped with 70 ampere high intensit\ arcs. 
.Special 100 watt amplifiers were augmented bv 
two booster speaker horns placeil behind the 
screen. Careful placement of speakers resulted 
in clear sound received in every corner of the 
amphitheatre. 

Prior to (he Chicago showings, Bip Idea re- 
ceived its premiere at the first-run Onialia 
Theatre in Omaha, Neb., where muih of the 
film was made. A total of ').(t'Ht persons at- 
tended six performances there. The theatre 
showings were followed by well-publicized Sun- 

(CONTIMKn ON TIIK FOLLOW INC. PACK) 



-Q' 



;^^G 



In THK Pictlrks: (right, above I the first-run Omaha Theatre iias the scene of 
the premiere oj "Bip Idea" iihirh played six performances there: ( right, center I 
Omaha's Mayor Glenn dunninpham anil Mrs. ('iinninpham arrivin/i to intro- 
duce the film at premiere: i right, corner I mariptee promotion lends pala air 
at Omaha: and i bottom I /Mirt of the hupe rrontl at the Sioux Ti/v, loua, Suifl 
liimily I'arty for the "Bip Idea" shouinps. 





'd(&(Otfi 



(CONTINUED KKOM TllK I'RECEDINC PAGE) 
(lily afternoon toli-vision screening over KM-TV 
with a f(insor\ alive audience estimate of 50.(1(1(1 
in eastern !Nel)raska ami western Iowa. 

Swift lias released />'/;; lilea in holli .S,5 and 
16 mm. prints of D.'{ minutes, and in 16 mm. 
.'id and 27' u minute \ersions. Tiie 30 minute 
film is tailored for classroom and club audi- 
ences and the 27' -j minuli- picture is specially 
a<lapted for tele\ision. 

I he puMic dislrihulion pattern will Inllnw 
special cm|)lo\e showings at Swift units llinui^ii- 
out the L nited Stales and Canada. 

The Swift pulilii' relations department esti- 
mates Biji Idea will have wide public acceptance 
iiecause of the timeliness of its story theme 
dealin{i with the conflict between communism 
and the western world. The film has been ac- 
claimed bv the I nited States Slati' Departniciil 
as a public service contribution and inquiry lias 
been made as to its availability for showing in 
foreign countries. In initial screenings sched- 
uled in Nebraska. Illinois. Iowa. Minnesota, 
(ionnecticut and Florida. Bisi Idea is being in- 
troduced by state and local government officials 
and educators. 

Only Three Professional Actors 

Some l-W) Swift employes appear in the pic- 
lure built around Hollywood character per- 
formers Veronika Patak\. Kuropean dramatic 
actress: Milburn Stone, veteran of 178 Holly- 
wood productions, and Jim Bannon, who plays 
■'Red Ryder" on the screen. 

The picture theme involves a Voice of Amer- 
ica announcer whose claims for American free- 
doms are challenged by an accredited news- 
paper woman from a Soviet satellite nation. 
She and a leftist American newsman tour the 
Tnited States, visiting Americans at work and 
at home. The dramatic climax makes a story 
as hard-hitting as today's headlines. 

Edward M. Grabill of Vi'ilding directed, and 
James Frindle was the writer. Photography is 
by John Niklasch. W 




"VoicK OK A.MKRICA " announcer Ed Kellar issues 
a chaUenne to those who doubt America . . . 




Moment of Reflkction as the train speeds 
them on to their Omaha destination . . . 



Swift Supplies a Promotion File 
to Help Managers Hold Showings 



ir The well-produced sound motion picture can 
be a powerful vehicle in the company program 
— IF — its presentation and promotion are 
thoroughlv planned and professionallv carried 
out with all details properK taken care of. 

An experienced sponsor of business films, 
.Swift is well aware of these needs and has pre- 
pared a ciiJiiprrhciisiM' prurniptiiiiial filr lu help 




Lavia Alles, netvs reporter from "behind ihf 
iron riirlnin" takes uji Kellar' s challeniie. 




Swift People change the doubling nriier 
views about the real values in our land. 



managers hold successful "Family Parties" in 
their local areas. The file and its voluminou- 
program notes are well worth reviewing for tin 
guidance of other sponsors and as example ot 
good showmanship in the presentation of these 
employee events. 

The kit was prepared in mimeographed form, 
for the most part, and housed in an attractively 
printed three-fold package. The first "pocket" 
contains "Your Plan'" and contains materials to 
help managers in "deciding on the "where, what, 
who and how" of the showings. " 

The (iMitcr i)ocket pnA'ides "Your Tinietable" 



LoKKY I'komotion at Omaha shared billing oj 
the film and the famed local Choral Club, which 
uas a featured part of the program in that city. 



Television Sckeening over Omaha's k.UTI 
swelled the already large audience by an esti- 
mated riO.OOf) additional viewers in that area. 



Ihci. I'kojection Screen of the Ul x 2H-foot 
size look some handling for the Chicago pre- 
mieres in the huge International .Amphitheatre. 




30 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



and coiilaitis check lisls t« ""hflp \ou kimw what 
to fill and wlii'ii." Tin- third pnikot ilescriljcs 
"Your I'art\" and cnnlains materials that will 
■'hel|i \'>u ".seir ^<^ur partx : your final post; 
and for public showing of the film. Samples 
of programs, posters, streamers, and liulletin 
board material are included. 

These steps begin in thi- field with the selec- 
tion of a planning committee. Mend>ership on 
the conmiittee includes all l>pes of employes 
and representation b\ union oflicers and stew- 
ards. The committee's structure may include 
three sub-chairmen for attendance, arrangements, 
and activities with their respectixe assignments. 

Complete Information on Showing Sites 

S'lection of a suitable site for the film show- 
ing includi's cotisideration of local theatres, 
school as,sendil\ halls, club rooms, and public 
auditoriums where films may be projected. 
Rental cost, safely factors, seating capacitN. 
stage facilities, acoustic's, display space. |>ark- 
ing. cheikrooms. toilets, \entilalion. motion pic- 
lure ei|uipment and projection booth facilities 
as well as those for serving refreshments are 
the check points for making a good selection 
of ihe showing place. 

The invitation list is next in consideration. 
Companv emplovees. active and retired, receive 
first consideration. If facilities permit, invita- 
tions may be extended to dealers, shareholders, 
press and radio, producers. local civic and busi- 
ness lea<lers. clergv. and educators. It s im- 
portant, the file points out. to maintain an in- 
formal "employe" familv atmosphere and to 
avoid overcrowding. (^.Showings at Omaha, Chi- 
cago and Sioux City which exceeded attendance 
expectations proved the wisdom of this pre- 
caution I . 

A jiroMiotional booklet, sampleil in the til>'. 
is available to include with each imitation. 

Details of the "Family I'aily"' l'ro:;r.iMi 
V^hile the film tiifi Idea makes up the major 
part 1.5.5 minutes l of the program, good sug- 
gestions are made to round out the evening with 
other enlertainmeni features. F?riefly these are: 
1. Additional films, such as theatrical short 
subjects. 

Amateur or "h<mie talent" entertainment, 
('ommunilv singing. 
Professional entertainment, if cost reason- 



2. 



ible 



Throughout the file, simplicity and reasonable 
cost are stressed. Light refreshments and modest 
entertaiinnent are the rule with the film as the 
central theme anrl other features planned so 
as not to detract from it. 

Good suggestions are given for actual program 
<letails such as the presence of a reception coni- 
niiltei' at the hall entrance; the use of prc-pro- 
gram music: a brief weliome bv the manager: 
pri-sentation of awards for sali-s. safet\. sugges- 
tions, service, etc.; presentation of door prizes 
such as companv products; and finally other 
lirirf enlertainmeni climaxed by ihe presenta- 
tion of IMti lilra as the closing element on the 
program. Light refreshments follow the snow- 
ing of the fi'alured film. 

As ati example of the |irogram pos.«ibilitics. 
Swift's excellent Choral Club in Omaha pre- 
senteil "A Waltz Dream" as their musical con- 
tribution to the liiji Idea »cre«'nings in that city. 




I 



POSTERS AND BULLETINS 

helped awaken Interest end promote 
attendance in advance of the local film 
showings in various plant towns. 



Don't miss 



^omnosooH 



• • 



i'h-^^JiSBSti^ 



The story ov 
areatest sfre 

AFR. 



onrf Afferent \^\nd of 
'nohon picture 



Tickets for these showings are an imporlani 
ingredient in the arrangeimiils. Obviously their 
ilistribulion helps to assure sufTicienl seating 
capacity adjusted to the ticket demand. The 
importance of this factor i» shown b\ the numer- 
ous occasions when demand ex«-eeiled earlier 
and more conservative estimates. .Su|>ervisors 
dislribuleil premiere tickets to all who requested 
them for themselves, their families and their 
friends. 

Omaha "F'amilv I'arly" commiltew also tume<l 



out some e\iellenl and ine\|N-nsi\i' lellerheail- 
•ize color bulletins which pla\e<l up the com- 
bined choral and film program throughout the 
wi-rks 4>re»-eding the actual performanrrs. 

Your I'rtigrani Has to He Diflerrnt 
ICarh s|M>nM>r ha-s an indiv idualily almul his 
enterprise and his field. Tliese lend aulhenlicily 
and a fiN-al theme to the pr<-«4-nlation of his 
own "Knmilv l'«rtie«." That is the essence o( 
Swift's «uc«-rss in the nationwide presentation of 
Aig /i/ra. It nlfo hel|is to have a fiood filin. ff- 



MMIIK K 1 • VOUMK. l; 



1 •) .-, 1 



31 




r 



•i 



n 



This is 



f 



! -^N 



Life 




Below : Y 



Rigid standards of inspection inninlnin the hisih quality oj Amerira's meat prodiirtion. 



M\:\T. a basic food in man'- (li(-t. is of fundamental inlir- 
est to all Americans. \(iung and old. Its /;/// and complete 
story is told, at long last, in an exciting new emotional 
docunientar) motion piclure in full color produced for the \mer- 
ican .Meat Institute b\ Raphael G. Wolff Studios of Hollywood. 
Appropriately titled This Is Life, this 29-minute sound film is the 
story of the "meal team" all the way from the ranches and farms 
of America to the consumer's dinner table. 

Three oxerail phases are involved in the story. First, there is 
the nutritional value of meat, brought out vividl\ in lioth docu- 
mentary and character animation. Second, llic work of the pcnplr 



Belou : One of the most colorful members of the "meat team" is 
this hop auctioneer shown at Waterloo. Iowa in "This Is Life." 



THE AMERICAN MEAT INSTITl Tl 
TELLS STORY OF "MEAT TEAM" 

* * * 

of llic meat industry; and third, there is strong; 
identification of the consumer audience with 
the subject. Through all these phases, sound, 
music and words complement and supplement 
the beautifully photograjjhed scenes. The result 
is a fdm that provides a fine exposition on meat 
as a food and a deep appreciation of the pari 
played by meal production and processing in the 
economic life of the nation. 

This Li Life was premiered last month to meat 
industry executives in Baltimore and at subse- 
quent screenings by packing house and othi? 
meat industry interests in other parts of the 
country. 16min sound prints are available im- 
mediately for nationwide free loan through the 
27 regional exchanges of Modern Talking Pi( - 
ture .Service. Inc. with emphasis on rural ami 
urban adult groups, industrial audiences, school- 
and colleges. 

The universal interest of this subject is un- 
questionable and the emotional impact on typical 
audiences is almost phenomenal for a subject f>f 
this kind. In bringing together the narrative 
story of a whole segment of American industr\. 
if has scored a real success for the Meat Insti- 
tute, its far-sighted sponsor. 53' 



rn new- facts about meat from the man who ^ells il. 







■w Y~ r ■■■■ 





Itt SFNESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 




Raising the meat crop has its moments 



Geiu'!<is of tln" Meat Picture 
liy Raphu.'l (,. W ..IIT 

♦ We felt that 77ti\s Is Life was esseeilially the 
story of you — and how powerful substanres 
came out of the earth to enter your own l)h)oil 
stream- -to become your own ideas, actions and 
activities. Somehow, the idea Edison had for 
the invention of electric light was once a force 
in the roots of some vegetation. We saw the 
relation between acres of grass and the lives of 
all Americans. 

So- -we began with the grass, ^'e said: "If 
you could see the shajie of the future here, 
you'd find that you, yourself, were there in the 
grass somewhere." The story is as elemental 
as that. 

We go on to show that the good of the earth. 
first appearing in grass blades, grain heads and 
corn ears, is transformed and changed and 
made available to your own tissues and body 
cells as meat. We go on to show that there are 
millions of [>eople to bring meat to you and 
we cover a cross secliun of their activities. 

Meet till- Man Beliind the Counter 

BasicalK we built the continuity along the 
following lines: 

After arousing interest and making clear the 
elemental inipliiations, we quickly bring the 
go(i<l of the earth up to the meat lounler, ai\d 
we introduce the customer and the meat man. 
This man behind the counter is the only mem- 
ber of the American meat team that the average 
|H'rs(in ever comes in contact with. 'I he first 
thirty seconds of the film arc. in effect, a rapid 
review iif the whole story. The sti.r\ proper 
begins at the point of contact between the mi-at 
retailer and the customer. 

By this lime our audience have identified 
ihemselvis with the sul>j<( t. and we launch inti> 
a brief, abstract doiumenlar\ animation se- 
quence that calls attention to the pla< e of com- 
plete protein in the diet. From this we dr\el..p. 
in a few words and s<ene.H. the experience of 
Slefansson. the .Xrctic explorer, and the amazing 
ne« conception "f protein that came about in 
the S4ienlifi< worlil less than Iwi-ntv vear» ago. 

Here is a s|i>r> that bi-gins on your <liMner- 
plate and runs buck into the skein of American 
history. In a few scenes we recount the back- 
ground of the meat iniluslry. which logically 
lends to pres«-nt-diiy meat production on farms 
and ranc hrs all over ihi- <ountry. We avoid 
|Mrsi>ii.di/iMc the meat animals, but rather we 



N r M II K R .1 • \ n I I M K I : • I •» 5 I 



treat them as a crop. It i- the jieniAe whom ue 
concentrate on. 

We continue through packing, distribution 
and retailing in the same vein. Ue trv to make 
it abundantly <'lcar that while ynu and they nia\ 
be strangers forever, the hog farmer, the caltli- 
range rider, the stock train engineers and brake- 
men — the loin pullers and bacon trimmers 
even the girls in the oHices who work with in- 
voices, bills of lading an<l order blanks rather 
than sides of beef nr laniied sausages, are stainl- 
ing in\isible beside \iiu when you pull up your 
chair at mealtime. 

It*- Mealtime Across the Land 

\\ c reach our climax in a cycle of mealtimes 
following the sun from the break of day on the 
Kastern shore, ami the first yellowing light on 
the towers of Matdiallan an<l the roofs of farm 
houses in Maine and .New Hampshire, until the 
last rays of evening are quenched in the waters 
of the F'acific; we mark the hours across the 
nation in terms of sizzling bacon, the pork 
chops, the roasts and the steaks — to say nothing 
lif the hatnburger "with." 

In order to keep us attuned to the human feel- 
ing we scored the film with the voices of a 
chorus, rather than musical instruments. 

Before we began preparing the script we 
crossed the continent from East to West -pry- 
ing into sheep herds on ,\ew ^ ork farms, in- 
\estigating .Minnesota hog houses, trekking over 
cattle ranges from Florida to Colorado and 
Wyoming. We visited packing houses and 
laboratories from Chicago to Denver and l.os 
Angeles. 

Then we prepared the script: balancing all 
phases and orienting them to the subject for the 




. . . but stockmen play a vital business role. 

most telling cunmlative effect. Photographic 
crews followed the original itinerary and cov- 
ered subjects all the way from pharmaceutical 
manufacture in Chicago to longhorn her<ls on 
remote ranges in Oklahoma. 

The completed film tells the story of meat — 
but in relation to vour own blood cells, it in- 
corporates the relation of blizzards in C<dorado 
to the .steak you may order in a restaurant: the 
relation of nails driven in the roof of a hog 
shelter to the ham slice whose sizzling song 
heralds another day in your life. 

Teamwork Makes a Good Picture 
From the ver> inception of This Is Life we 
hail the intelligent sup|Hirt of the .\merican 
Meat Institute and of the !,«'o Burnett .\gency. 
Working together, we were able to achieve a 
film that makes its contribution to the story 
of America: the especiallv moving and colorful 
version of the story that is being told by the 
industrial film induslrv and doing, we believe, 
a good job of letting Americans know what 
their unseen neighbors across the land are ac- 
complishing for them: the contribution that all 
are making to the greatest way of life that hu- 
manity has known thus far. if 




CASE IIISTOKIKS 




Cameras in action for "Waters" film 

Peiiii>yl\aiiia l'i':lil> Water Pollution 

With a Dual Picture Canipai<<:n 

Sponsor: Pennsylvania Sanitary Water Board. 
Title: Kalers of the Commonwealth. 25 niin.. 

16nim sound, color, produced l)y The Jam 

Handy Organization. 
■¥ Water pollution as a threat to health and 
safety, and the relation hctween pollution and 
everyday uses of water are the subjects in the 
visual supplements to other media in the Anti- 
Pollution Campaign of the State of Pennsylvania. 

In fact, the 16nmi production is only one-half 
of the presentation. A .S5nim color version for 
theatres also has been distributed, concurrently. 
The theatre film runs 10 minutes: the 16nmi ver- 
sion for schools, churches, clubs and other com- 
munity groups has more complete coverage and 
technical data. In production, both studio sets 
and extensive location filming were required, 
with .S5mtn and 16nHn cameras shooting each 
scene. Both films have narration and music 
background. 

After introductory depiction of the value of 
water resources to the recreation and tourist in- 
dustry, to livestock and agriculture, and to in- 
dustrial processes, the action turns to examples 
of water-polluting wastes in the main sources: 
raw sewage, industrial waste, soil erosion, dis- 
carded poisons, coal silt and acid mine drain- 
age. When industry is shown the costs of waste, 
it cooperates to control pollution: the public 
indorses the cost of sewage treatment plants. 
and sportsmen welcome the clean streams cam- 
paign, f- 

Typical source of farm water [xiltiilion 




Ethyl Aids Service Stations 
With a Sales Training Picture 



Sponsor: Ethyl Corporation. 

Title: There Is a Difjerence. 22 miii., Iliiiiin 
sound, color, produced by Pathescope Pro- 
tluclions. 

M The Ktini Corporation is in a uni<|ue po.si- 
lion. The number of its direct customers is 
limited, it makes no sales tn ultimate users of 
its product, yet Ktliyl tetractlnl lead is used to 
a greater or lesser extent by every car owner 
in the country. Beyond its straight sales story 
of encouraging increased use of "premium" 
gasoline (which contains more ''ethyr' I the cor- 
poration considers that it has two important 
things to sell: good-will for itself and for its 
petroleum marketer customers. 

To help in accomplishing this. Ethyl has car- 
ried on a film program since 19.36. It has never 
told a product story, always pointed at ways 
to cooperate with its direct customers and help 




featured /ilayer in "There Is a Difference' 

the petroleum using public. Subjects have been 
devoted to the development of the automotive 
industry iThe Long Road, Ethyl's first film), 
soil conservation (This Is Our Land), new or 
better uses for farm machinery I several films 
sponsored by Ethyl for the ISational Retail Farm 
Equipment Association) and "social service" 
t\pe of pictures designed to increase the prestige 
of the service station owner or operator in his 
own mind (Looking Ahead). 

Since Januarv this year. Etln I has been dis- 
tributing ;i new film. There Is A Difference 
(produced b\ Palhesco]x; Productions) which 
is the first the company has planned with sales 
training specifically in mind. 

For better or worse, the great majority of 
films ])roduccd for driveway salesmen are prod- 
uct stories "more pep," "less acid," "our 
grease is greasier," etc. A few others show the 
man at the pump how to use the magic formula 
— the tested sentence. All these pi<tures have 
some amount of value. Product information 
and the right phrase at the right time have 
served salesmen well since the serpent sold Eve 
on the apple. 

What Ethyl has sought to contrihuli- to the 
station operator and his men is a short human 
course of practical sales psychology to help them 



do a belter job. Premise of this is that cus- 
tomers are not a mass target for the tested power 
phra.se. Each is different, each has special needs, 
and the salesman who understands them as 
human beings can do a better selling job. 

People Don't Fit a Fornuila 

The film accomplishes this by showing a 
young service station employee talking to his 
boss about the new station he is planning to 
open for himself soon. After his boss scoffs 
good naluredly at his "tested" greetings phrase, 
and the young man's alter ego reminds him of 
some times when it has failed, we see him be- 
ginning to adapt his knowledge of his customers 
as different j>eople. and as friends, to his sales 
work in the station. 

Rather than trying to provide a pat answer 
to all the problems of driveway selling. There h 
A Difference attempts to imjdant the idea of the 
human elements involved in every selling situa- 
tion. It suggests that copybook sales maxims 
do not always provide the right approach, urges 
the man at the pump to keep the customer in 
mind. 

Essential Facts on Distribution 

Ethyl has supplied 125 prints of There Is A 
Difference to its oil company customers since 
the first of the year. Demand is still high. Dis- 
tribution of the 22 min.. color film is handled 
tiirough channels of each petroleum marketing 
com])any. .Showings are arranged in various 
locations for all station operators and their 
employees. ^ 



Girl Scouts Make Increasing 
Use of Educational Film Mcdimn 

Sponsor: Girl Scouts of America. 

Title: The Growing Years, 20 min.. b&w. 
produced by the Girl Scouts National 
Organization, directed by William Res- 
nick. 

■¥■ Films play an important part in the Girl 
Scouts' educational program. Three films 
on scouting in troops, two on international 
friendship and one on camping have made 
up the motion picture group of offerings 
thus far. in addition to seven filmstrips on 
training for local administrators. 

The latest film, just released, is con- 
cerned with the sense of "belonging," 
points out what Girl Scouting can mean to 
new girls in the community. 

Two attractive young scouts from New 
Rochelle, N. Y. take feature parts in the 
film. Henry Fonda is narrator. It will be 
shown to sihool, civic, church and club 
groups (via Association Films) to explain 
what Girl Scouts do and how their pro- 
gram helps them in their own development 
as individuals and as members of the com- 
munity. 

With such a simple, happy little tale, it 
seems a shame to report that the music 
track sounds as if it had been dredged 
from the depths of an old W.P.A. file — 
discarded from the dirge to a dust bowl 
documentary — and entirely out of keeping 
with the subject. 5? 



31 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Precision Checks on Quality 
Technical Feature of Olin Fihii 

S|i<>iis<>r: Vt fslern Hrass Mills Division i)f 

Olin liidustrit's. 
ritle: It's Tlif Counted Pieces That Ciiunt. 
25 mill., color, produced by Sound Mas- 
ters, Inc. 
■¥■ This is a general run-around of the 
Weslern Brass Mills plant at Kast Alton. 
Illinois. It shows the production of a va- 
rietv of copper base alloys, how they are 
fornied. tested, packaged and put to an 
ind use. 

Interesting scenes show how spectro- 
graph Ic tests of alloys insure exactness in 
the coniposition of the component metals: 
others depict a "flying micrometer" that 
permits instant cheek of the thickness of 
fast moving sheets of hrass as they come 
..tr the mill. 

The film will he used for several pur- 
poses te<hnical education, public infor- 
mation and sales promotion. ^ 



Sun's Picture 1 akt - to the Hoail 
to Prove Oil Performance Claims 

Sponsor: ."^un Oil Company. 
Title: AAA Road Test, 30 min., color, pro- 
duced by Films For Itidustry. Inc. 
♦ Last winter. Sunoco sent a caravan of cars 
from Quebec to Key West and back on a road 
test of Dvnalube motor oil. Traveling steadily 
under all cliinalic and road conditions, the 
brand new Chevrolet. Ford. Oldsmobile and 
Plymouth averaged 1395 miles per quart of oil. 
AAA Road Test, which stands as a separate 
dealer training film by itself, follows a pattern 
which Sun has been using successfully for some 
time. Kewiote of this is to actually prove by 
tests visible on the screen all claims made for 
the companx's jK-troleum products. Some of 
these are dramatic in themselves, but in any case 
the testing personnel and producer are under 
instructions to take no liberties with complete 
aulhenlicily. 

The Dvnalube test was supervised from be- 
- riing to end by the American Aulomobili- 
I'iation. fhis involved a complete teardown 
and lalibralion of all engine parts both before 
and after the road test, careful measurement of 
all petroleum products used and su[>ervisioii of 
all drivers and observers. 

A Films F'or Industry photographic crew ac- 
|innieil the caravan throughout the lest and 
I several mill's of Koilachronii' en route. A« 
111' re was no opportunity to wail for "ideal" 
ilher conditions for color photographv, many 
■les were made in snowstorms, rain, dust, 
uailv morning and nighlliine. The results prove 
the versatililv of connnercial Kodai hronii-: mniiv 
of the best scenes were shot under what has 
usuallv been considered the "worst" conditions. 
AAA Road Test will l)e us<'d to provide Sun- 
oco dealers with an accurate informational back- 
ground to Sun's new ad campaign on Dynalube, 
said to be the largest advertising campoign ever 
conducted for a motor oil. W 





^ 1 J^^^^l 



Historiral seqiienre in "Credit" film 

The Story of Dun \ l{ra«l-lreet 
Told in "Credit Man"s Confulence" 

Sponsor: Dun & Bradstreet. Inc. 

Title: (.reilit. Man's Confidence in Man. .S.T 

min.. sound, produced bv W ilding I'iclure 

Productions, Inc. 
^ America's 3.30 billion dollar credit business, 
the ((Otter which has hel|M-d make this coun- 
try's economv the envv of the world, as «ell as 
the lifesaver of more than one nation, comes to 
the screen in an educational and historical pro- 
duction that opens u ith a se(|uencc of a young- 
ster si>ending his penny on a fishhook and pre- 
serves that human interest flavor throughout. 

Ten vears were reipiired to get out the film: 
that is. that's how long the idea of making one 
had been discussed. Calls from educators and 
business organizations for a motion picture to 
explain credit principle and operation finally 
jelled into action in 1949. A. M. Sullivan, ad- 
vertising manager, began work on the script, a 
long task of writing aiid rewriting, what with 
all the intricacies of policies and technicalities 
involved. 

-Mercantile Agency Born in I8H 

The slorv is of the birth of the Mercantile 
Agency, after a proposal bv Lewis Tappaii at a 
nieetitig in \M\ that merchants contribute ledg- 
er information to start a system of local corre- 
s|Hindents for collettion and dissemination of 
impartial credit ilata. The need was urgent be- 
cause of the abus<-s that had followed the panic 

of I as 7. 

\X'hcn A. T. Stewart, founder of the John 
Wanamaker stores, indorsed the plan, the few 

Today's Bi'SINESS is de/M-ndenl on impartial 
credit data for its sound ofH-ration. 




diehard skeptics were won over, and Tap|)an's 
agencv began serving merchants of 14 states. 

Research for authenticity of costumes, office 
settings and business procedures of the period 
was not the least of the tasks of the Wilding 
studio liefore shooting could U-gin. Fiftv pro- 
fessionals were chosen for the east: the onlv 
ni(n-professionaL. were mend»ers of the I) & B 
'•taff and some home folk of Marengo, HI., where 
exteriors were taken. 

Today a Nasi Credit Organization 
From the fishhook episode, uied to show that 
the lad's surrender of his penny was the |i>ne 
cash transaction "from iron mine to fish line"' 
in marmfaclure of the hook, the storv tak<-s the 
viewer from the days of frontier barter through 
the westward spread of trade, with ofieration 
scenes in the companv's New York office and 
Brooklyn printing plant, and reporters at work 
in a variety of situations. 

The production is an exposition of the use 
of credit by the .American family b>r household 
necessities, by the small businessman to over- 
come adversity and expand in prosperity, by 
the banker to put money to work. But it is more 
than a treatis<>: it is a romance of the .\merican 
way of life. |f 



Rogers' New Film on Taltle 
Silver -Meets Audience \ iew point 



-| I 



Sponsor: 1K47 Rogers Brothers, division of 

International Silver Company. 
Title: Uesipns for a llomemaker, 20 min.. col- 
or. Produced by Sound Masters. Inc. 
•^ -Vbout two vears ago a film was releaseil 
showing a bride, her new home and her we<I- 
(ling gifts of silver. The bride was dri-sse<l to 
the teeth, she was set up in a STS.IKXJ hou.se with 
a Cadillac in the drivewav. and her silver would 
have st<(cked a good siziil department in a store. 

Obviouslv. this approach to the average buver 
of silver was abvsmallv wrong from a psycho- 
logical standpoint. The clear implication given 
in picture and words was of an unbreakable lie 
U-lween considerable wealth and the owning of 
silver. 

This background is im|Mirlanl in considering 
Desipns for a llomemaker. a new picture on sil- 
ver jusi releas«-d bv International Silver's UVtT 
Rogers Brothers division. Here we have a young 
girl who cannot afford to buy a gift set of silver 
for her sister's wed<ling pn-M-nt. but enters a 
table S4'lling contest in the bx'al communilv hall 
to try to win it. 

Of course she wins-'nol <>nly the silver set. 
but, eventually, romance and a wedding of her 
own. 

This is soap ofiera selling, to be sure, but an 
ap|H'aling i<lra and a realistic approach to the 
audience of M'hool girls, home et-onomii-s stu- 
dent* and Women's clul>s mendxTs that MoDKHX 
Tm-KIm; I'nTiRE S»:nvni;, l.>t.. is finding (or 
the film. 

The contest, and incidents in the new bride's 
home, give a good excuse (or a dotrn s4-enes of 
han<ls<ime table settings that should inspire most 
girls to dash home and e\)ierimenl with what 
• liver tl»ev have. |>erha|>s lay plans (or getting 
the silver they need. ft 



NUMBKR 3 • \(»l. I Ml. U • 1931 



3.1 



Bl Si:\ESS SCItE 




era 



M DIO-VISIAL SALES INSTITI II |{()\l!l) MKKTS IN CHICAGO 



(I. KM I I'lii' K<iar<l of (Inv 
<Tniir> of the Naliniial III- 
-liiiilr (or Audio • \isiial 
N'lliiii: niPt in (Chicago 
May 5. Slmwii 1 1, lo r.) 
M-alccI an* John Prrscll, 
Indiana I .: John J. I)o>- 
l.d. Chairman, of K(^^; 
Kidiirl I.. Shoemaker. 
Operudio; lla/el Calhoun 
Sherrill. (!alhoun Co., 
Adolph Wirlhiinier. Radi 
ani; .Norma Karl-. HIS; 
Rrunson \Iolle\. Cathe- 
dral: U. Ilerherl Myers 
Hi^eler; Ernest Tiemann. 
Indiana L .: Frank K. 
Creasy, dealer; Harold A. 
Kiseher, (^onipco; Don 
While. NAVA; and Al 
lliineeke. Operadio. .Stanil 
int:: Karl Ualiilrrt. Indi- 
ana r.: and James (i^tod- 
sell. Popular Science. In- 
stitute will be held this 
'•ummer a^ain at Indiana. 



ARMED FORCES COMMUNICATION ASSN. HOLDS FILM FORUM 




(Right I .\ fonun on pho- 
tography and visual aids 
was a feature of the .\rnieil 
Forces (!onimunications 
.Association's annual meet- 
ing in ('hica^o last -April. 
Moderator in charge was 
W. C DeVry. president of 
DeVr>' Corporation. Panel 
memlMTs included Captain 
William C. Eddy, I SN. 
I Ret. I : Vere O. Smith, 
civilian Training .Aids .Spe- 
cialist for the 9lh Naval 
District at Great Lakes, 
III.: and 0. H, Coelln. 
editor and publisher of 
Busine.ss Screen ( stand- 
ing). 

Speakers presented a 
1-oniprehensive review of 
audio and visual tools use- 
ful to manufacturers serv- 
ing the armed forces, par- 
ticularly in the optical ami 
electronic helrls. Training 
hims, opaque and other 
techniques were shown. 



MAKV PICKFORD PRESENTS THIRD CANADIAN FILM AWARDS 





ll.KPTI .Mary Pickford Ca- 
nadian-born star, congrai- 
(dates some winners of 
the .Hrd .Annual Canadian 
I'ilm Awards {(resented on 
April 22. E'oreground 
are (left) Julian Biggs. 
-Nat'l Film Board director: 
.Stanle>' Jackson, also an 
NKH director. Standing (I. 
to r. I are .Morten Parker. 
director of The FighlSci- 
t-nrr Aptjinst Cancer: 
Michel .Sanouillet. I'niver- 
sity of Toronto Film So- 
ciety; D. R. -Michener. 
chairman of tin' .Awards 
I om ni i 1 1 ee : .Maurice 
Montgrain. (Quebec govern- 
ment winner; and Ron 
Wcyman, .NFB directur of 
l/ins Lr Bagne. .Associ- 
ated Screen News' Sitz- 
marks the Spot was an- 
other winner. The Cana- 
dian .Association for .Adult 
Educatitm sponsors the 
awards. 

More than .SO organiza- 
tions are represented in 
the grimps sponsoring these 
annual awards lo factual 
hlms in (-anada. 







'I'ltAI.MNc; DiKKCTOH.s iiiel III I'liilailelijliia jur ihi' 
year's annual convention anil films again tool, 
an important part in their discussions. Shotvn 
ahove are (I. to r.) James Inplefieltl. vice-presi- 
dent of WiUling Picture I'roduclions, Inc., of' 
j\ew York City: and Fred S. Laffer, president 
of the American Society of Training Directors.' 




\n\iKi) Forces Commlm(:.\tions celebrities in 
eluded both Army and Savy Signal officers llffl 
to right) shown with W. C. Del ry (left, center i 
president of Del ry Corporation and chairman 
of the forum on photography: and Theodore >■ 
Gary, president of the Association and chairmim 
of its 1951 Convention ichich ivas held at ll'' 
Drake Hotel in Chicago in April. 




■■■{mis Is I.ikk"' I'hoih <:iu)N 'i"K.\M sboun abnf 
on a sound .stage of the W olfj Studios in llolli- 
icood included 1 1, to r.) Charles O. Husting. 
the Leo Burnett Company, Chicago: Raphael '• 
Wolff, producer; and Vernon Schitaegerle. ad- 
vertising director for the American Meat Insti- 
tute. This colorful and dramatic new motion 
picture story of the "meat team" is described «" 
other pages of this issue. 



36 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZIM 



II 



ONK ti)l(l winter morning, year before last. 
Leo Beebe. head of the For<l Motor 
Company's motion picture (lei)arlnii'tit. 
iriil Larry Madison, partner in New Yori^'s MI'O 
I'lciduitions, were lying on their stoinarhs in 
the snow beside a Colorado road. While cow 
hands whooped and waved to move their snow 
jbound steers down the road to shelter, Beebe 
mI Madison shot a roll of film and worked out 
il plans for a new movie on the American 
ktiwboy a tentative project which up to then 
Ihnd brought them to the cattle countr\ on a 
ilion scouting trip. 

While script conferences in a thirty degrees 

"W zero blizzard are not standard procedure 

Kord rTiinies. the incident illustrates a way 

lioing things that has produced four of the 

iiiii-.t outstanding pictures available to 16mm 

.iiidiences anywhere today. The four, forming 

ford's Americans At Home series, are The 

inierican Cottboy. Men of Gloucester. Pueblo 

/>"i and Southern Hijihlanders. Each presents 

.1 "lice of Americana unusual in treatment, hu- 

iii.ui, colorful and quite a bit different from 

ilii- run-of-the-mill business film. An important 

l.i' lor in the success of the series is the lack of 

.1 preconceived ""tight" script. Instead of setting 

'III with plans directing "here is what we want 

ihiM- j(fople to do — here is the exact situation 

wr have to shoot,"' Americans At Home |)ictures 

are based on this premise: ""Let see what these 

people are doing, let's record their life as they 

live it and make our picture out of that," 

Sequences Out of Real Life 
The results show up in many ways. Exam- 
ple: in the movies, cowboys always herd cattle 
on the wide prairies, up the broad canyons, 
across the deep rivers, but in The American 
Cowboy the most effective scenes of herding are 
in a blizzard or as a thousand steers move 
through a forest rooting up the brush, bawling 
and kicking up the dust to provide a camera and 
soutid sequence no s<ripl writer would ever 
dream up in advance. 

Another instance: while Leo Beebe was silting 
in his office trying to solve the problem of a 
suitable actor to play the one professional act- 
ing part in The American (lowboy to be tdmcd 
on location in Gunnison. Colorado during four 
seasons of the year — he looked up and saw his 
a.ssistant. Hex Pollock, in an outer office framed 
in a \tanr of glass: problem solved. 

Pollock looked the part of the \i>iting reporter 
and also ac(|uitted himself so well in his first 
acting job that he max become the protagonist 
of several Kord films of the future. 

(Camera Artistry — Plus (Jooil Jinlgnienl 
No luiiall part of the credit for the success of 
ihe Americans At Home series goes to MPO's 
Madison who has fdiiicil all four. A very mobile 
cameraman, Madison is usually in the right place 
at the right time for the single scene that 
breathes life into an olhi-rwi»c mundane subject, 
Sti-aily as a tripod, his hand-held sec|uences 
almo.st always defv detection. 

The Americans At Home pictures are but one 
part of Ford's him o|i<Tations. In aildilioii to 
frequent technical training subjects or other 
purely internal proje< Is, Kord currently dis- 
tributes some twentv-five entertainment or edu- 
rational motion pictures on such topics as the 
automidiile industry, vacation lands, sports. 




There's il Ford Film III VoiirFiiliire 

COLOKFl L PIBLIC KELATiO.NS FIL.M PKOliKAM .SKIS \ HK.H STA.NDAKD 



driver education or the .American enterprise 
system, 

,\11 these are part of Ford's basic aims in 
all its relations with the |)ublic. It wants to s»'ll 
automobiles, make friends for the company, cre- 
ate good will for the automobile industry as a 
whole, explain the workings and merits of the 
free enterprise system and reminil citizens that 




■"Amkhi<:a> ChWHOY." lalrsi of Ford's film series 
on "Americans at Home." is one of finest mtulern 
documentaries and destined to he immensely 
pofmlar with audiences. The "f^rafihic" above 
shou s the Ford film distribution i>attern. 



America, its land, people and traditions, has 
made everything we have possible. 

Inq>lementing the film program for the com- 
pany is a motion picture committee. I'nder 
chairman Leo Beel>e who is head of the Motion 
Picture Department of the Office of Public Re- 
lations, the conmiittee is formed of the repre- 
-enlatives of public relations, sales promotion 
and ad\ertisiiig. industrial relations and Ford 
International di\isions. This committee not only 
formulates plans for new public relations film 
projeits. acts on suggestions submitted by vari- 
ous s<-ctions or individuals in the world-wide 
Koril organization, but also coordinates the pro- 
duction antl technical supervision of all t\|>es 
of motion pictures for internal use. 

Distributed Through h Main I Iflicrs 
Kord public relations films are di.stributi-d 
through six main Ford offices in Ne%t' York, 
Washington, Dearborn, ("hicago, Kansas Citv 
and Uii htiiond. (ialifornia in each of which full 
lime enqdovres are re^|M>nsi|i|r for all film dis- 
tribution aclivitv. This is a new conq>any |M>licy 
.iiid has resulted in much greater cftiriencv and 
a larger numlK-r of showings per print. 

Foril encourages dealers to arrange fdm show- 
ings in their mmniunitirs. Some go so far as 
to put on a regular promotion canqtaign. mail 
out catalogs, deli\rr prints, and even provide 
projectors and o|>eralors for community grou|>s 
or srhoois. However, the company docs n«>l or- 
ilinarilv notify dealers of bookings made in 

MONTIMCII ON Tin: lot. LOW IMC P \ G E ) 



NUMBF.R i • VOI.l ME 12 



I ■> :. 1 



37 




Ill i>n>diulioii oil ".liiiii ii nil (.iiiihii\ 

The Ford Film Program: 

their communities unless llir slunv was actually 
arranged by the dealer. 

Ford has an interesting philosophy in regard 
to film promotion. Based on the concept that 
the most receptive audiences for public relations 
messages are close to home, the company pro- 
motes film showings according to a well estab- 
lished priority system. First are Ford's 150,000 
emplovees who are reached entirely on a volun- 
tary basis through recreation programs, com- 
pany parties, banquets and through showings in 
theatres in plant towns. Second are executives 
and employees of Ford's 6.000 supplier com- 
panies — so aptlv named in Ford's recent film, 
6,000 Partners^ Third is the family of 8,000 
Ford and Lincoln-Mercury dealers and their 
emplovees. Fourth are residents in towns where 
Ford plants are located. And fifth in priority, 
is the general public. 

Family Audience Deemed Most Vital 
Fords categorizing of audiences is not de- 
signed to underestimate or slight any segment 
of comjtany jjeople or the general public, but 
has been planned to gain the maximum amount 
of good for the company out of the materials 
available. Ford feels thai it is more important 
for its employees, business associates and neigh- 
bors to understand the company and its aims 
than anyone else. 

Besides shipping prints to borrowing groups 
from Ford's six main offices, some subjects are 
deposited on permanent loan in city and county 
school systems in plant city locations only. Other 
prints are used rixerseas by offices of Ford In- 
ternational. Some subjects an- also distributed 
abroad by the United States Office of Informa- 
tion. 

Films Reflect Gooil Citizenship 
Ford public relations have come a long way 
-ince the <'ompany gave out the old edict — "The 
public can have any color car it wants — as long 
as it's black." Without abandoning its original 
individuality, Ford has not only been a good 
citizen, but is making every effort to let people 
know about it. Films have played an important 
part in creating an employee force and a general 
public probably more favorablv disposed to- 
wards Ford and Ford products than ever before 
in the i ompany's history. JR* 



I'owcrfiil New Hiirkgroiiiiil I'lojcclor 

|)c\ clo|ii'il li\ l'atlicsc<>|ic I'rodiirlioris 

M I'iilliisi upi- I'roiluctiuns unM'iicd a new 20,- 
(HKI wall background pr<ijccti>r lasl month which 
is said to be one of the few to be found east of 
Hollywood, and in many respeits the only one 
of its kin<l. 

"The Mighty Mo." as it has been affection- 
ately dubbed by its operators, was constructeil 
in I'allicscopc's own shops, has an optical sys- 
tem of carbon arc. double condensers, film 
holder and lens. It is both water and air cooled, 
projects a strong image on a 2.H by .30 foot 
liackground screen from a 4 l>\ 5 inch film. 

OiIrt features: il mav i)e ailaptcd for motion 
jiiclurc background |)rojrction. can project a 
nio\ JMg background li\ lratis|)ortiiig a long strip 




Here's "Miiihty Mo" ready for action 

of film across the focal plane smootliK ii\ motor 
drive. 

Now being used on a feature sales promotion 
film for P. Ballantine & Sons (through J. Walter 
Thompson I . it has previously figured in a pic- 
ture for American Telephone & Telegraph Com- 
pany and in several TV spots for Coca-Cola 
and Bristol-Mjers. 

Thus far, the "Mighty Mo" has been used in 
conjunction with another new Pathescope tech- 
nique: the projected artwork background. This 
effect appears close to but not completely real 
as it appears on the screen. As a matter of fact, 
complete realism is avoided in favor of an im- 
pressionistic picture. Pathescope has found that 
greater emphasis can be gained for the im- 
portant parts of scenes — the actors and fore- 
ground .sets — by deliberately creating a pseudo 
image, attractixe i)ul not distracting. U' 

B(U'kliriiiinil i>n>je(tion jor liiilliiiiliiie film 




WcBt 'Virginia Shows Wliat Can 
Be Done for the Hand! cupped 



Sponsor: .State of West Virginia I)e|)artment of 

Vocational Rehabilitation. 
Title: An Investment in Human Welfare, 21 

mill., color, produced by Unifilms. Inc. 
+ This is a story of what one stale has accom- 
|>iished in |>royiding skill training and jobs for 
liandicap|)ed persons. It shows the kinds of jobs 
different l\pes of liandica|)ped people can handle 
best, explains that in many industrial situations 
a handicapped man or woman is even more 
ade])t than those with intact faculties. It also 
points out from actual records that job satis- 
faction is greater, morale higher and absentee- 
ism less among handicapped workers than among 
others. 

Robert Flaherty [irovides the narration, and 
tf) be truthful, it would seem the noted docu- 
mentarian is more at home behind the camera 
than behind the narrator's mike. '^ 

PRODUCTION REVIEW NOTES 

Additions and Corrections to the First 
Annual Business Screen Production Review 

Associated Screen News, Ltd. 

2000 Northdiff'e Avenue 

Montreal. Quebec 

Phone: DKxter 1186 

The following data was received while the last 
issue was on the press and should be added to 
your reference file on the above company: 

RECENT PRODUCTIONS AND .SPONSORS 
No Man Is an Island (Consolidated Mining 6, 
Smelting Co.); Food for Thought (Department 
of Fisheries. Quebec Government) ; Three for 
Health (Milk Foundation of Toronto, Inc.): 
The Lonii Furrotv (Cockshutt Plow Co.) ; /a< ' 
I'ine Journey (Canadian Pacific Railway Co. i ; 
The Heart oj the System (Quebec Hydro i: 
C Day (Hydro Electric Power Commission if 
Ontario) : Combine Cavalcade (Massey Harri- 
Co.): Canadian Woolens for Warmth an 
. Beauty (Avers Ltd.) : Miracle Fluid (Canadiii; 
Red Cross Society) : and Canadian Cameo si ■ 
rics of theatrical short subjects, 

Canadi.\.n Motion Picture 
Prodlctions. Ltd. 

80 King Street ^ est 

Toronto. Ontario 
Phone: I'La/.a «TKI 
Date of ()r:;ani/.alion: 1')17 
OIIKKR.S AM) 1)K,I'AI!T\IF\T HEADS 
(Jordon I). Fairlcy. President 
C. \. liirgc. ]'.!'. L. F. Hogg. Secty-Treas. 

I,. I). Cromicn. Mnp. Dir. & Exec. I'rod. 
W. R. Brunt. Director 
Service.s: Commercial films for industry spon- 
sorship: specializes in theatrical production. 
Fvcii.lTIKS: Contracts for studio, production 
ccpiipment and creative staff as required. 

RECENT PRODICTIONS AND SPONSORS 
Mission to Muskoka (Royal Muskoka Hotel I ; 
The lliinir of Austin in Ontario ( Austin On- 
tario .Motors, Ltd.) ; Sins of the Fathers, theatri- 
cal feature. 



38 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



WHICH WAY ARE YOU GOING? 




g)MPANY HI$ TORVand PBO/'RKs ) 



h.llVvA^» 



[reporting TO STQC KH0LDERS2 



y^f^ 



jOOO 



,Wl" 



MORALE 



'Attracting NEW EMPI 



lES 




Remember SOUND MASTERS 

not only has the KNOW-HOW but also the Cnrf l/U 

Vi)\{ M A N \ ^ K A l{ S W i; II \ \ i: I) ONE A K K V K A T Ml S I N E S S Willi I M I' ( » l{ T \ \ T 

c i, I E N T s IN M \ N ^ M \ ,i( 1 1{ I \ n r s r in i: s . w 1 1 i: n yq i \\\\ r l a .n n i n < ; 
in rsr iiii; imi'\( i oi iiik schek.n in \n^ w \^ xnd ihk \n^ iMHPnsi; — 

— LET US TALK WITH YOU — WE HAVE SOME GOOD IDEAS 






Souna Jiasiefis, Jnc. 



MOTION PICTURES 
SLIDE FILMS 
TV SHORTS AND 



165 WEST 46TH STREET — NEW YORK 19 . . . PHONE PLAZA 7-6600 COMMERCIALS 



NUMBERS • \ I > I I M K I ;; • 1951 



39 



In thei 




NEWS ABOUT FILMS AND PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES 



Sfene in "Hfaily on the Hall" 

Mishawaka's Color Slidefilm Aids 
Clerks Selling Canvas Footwear 

♦ Tlu- Mishawaku Riihl)or i. W dul- 
eii .Manufacturing Co.. maker of 
Ball-Hand products, took to the col- 
or and sound slidefilm medium for 
training retail clerks to sell Arch- 
Ciard shoes. Cartoons in Really on 
the Ball introduce the ideas of 
health, performance and popularity 
for the canvas footwear. The At- 
las Film Co. was the producer. 

Chicago Women's Ad Club Wins 
National Honors with Slidefilm 

♦ Test >( rtciiiii^s of ihr sound and 
color slidefilm Do ) ou fielonji in 
Adverlisingy , which contributed 
largely to the winning of first 
award of the Advertising Federa- 
tion of America for the \\ omen's 
Advertising Club of Chicago. 
are being given this spring. The 
film, to be released in the fall, was 
made by the Dallas Jones Produc- 
tions. 

Outstanding achievement in ad- 
vertising education was the basis of 
selection for the honors, to be pre- 
sented at the A FA convention of 
the 120 men's and women's clubs, 
opening June 10 in St. Louis. The 
film, produced for vocational guid- 
ance in the high schools of the Chi- 
cago area, is supplemented with 
booklets and other aids to teachers, 
parents and students. A bureau of 
the club is to provide speakers at 
the showings. For further informa- 
titm address the Women's Advertis- 
ing Club of (Chicago. .'160 N. Michi- 
gan \\p.. Chicago 1. 111. 

Illinois Central's Anniversary Film 

♦ The KMIth anniversarv of the 
Illinois CIkntkal Railroad is com- 
memorated in a video-commercial 
60-minute production. Centennial 
I'afieanl. which is being made in 
Chicago b\ the Jkrrv Fairbanks 
Prodlction.s. Fairbanks is super- 
vising the filming with the Multi- 
cam System, by crews from the 
Hollywood and New York studios. 



Selling Dow's Styron Products 

♦ Salogirl^ liaiidliiig MMi>n. the 
Dow (jiKMicAL Company's brand 
of polvstyrene. will know all about 
its (jualities of long wear, non-peel- 
chip-rust, and (xlorless service, after 
seeing the cornpam's lOmm sound 
and color slidefilm. ./ Dale iiilli 
I'olly, produced by TiiK Jam Handy 
Organization. The subjects of dis- 
plays and tie-in sales also are taken 
up in the film, which can be fitted 
into a 15 minute or half-hour in- 
struction meeting. For free loan ad- 
dress Dow Chemical Co., Public 
Relations Depl.. Midland. Micli. 

Electric Power History on Screen 

* The increasing popularity of elec- 
tric service from the beginning of 
the centurv. and the gearing of 



'Prospects and Profits 

for Payne Furnace 



\nicrica s pid>lii' utilities to meet 
till- nation's re(|uircmetits. are set 
forth in I'mier fur )<iii. lO-rninutc 
sound and color film [iroduced lor 
the PiiiLADKi.i'MiA Flkctrk: Com- 
pany by the News Reel Laboratory 
for the annual meeting of stock- 
holders. Stills and motion pictures 
ol carl\ appliances and historic 
events bring out thi" story. 

Mixrite Paper Service Is Theme 

♦ In /■(iiuildin (JIaniour. color and 
sound slidefilm of the LiLY-TuLIP 
Corp.. allcniion is on the compan\ s 
Mixritc paper service for speed and 
I cotioniy as well as sanitation and 
(juality assurance for fountain and 
restaurant. For free loan write the 
conipanv at 122 E. 42nd St.. New 
York Citv 17. 





UlllKl.TOll \IaI1V JoMK Hl.NN re 

hearses cast for "The Vein Is 
Rich," new Union Central Life 
Insurance film (story below)- 



New Music Appreciation Series 

* Music a|)|)reciation is the theme 
of a series of films in color to be 
made by the Bert Johnston Pro- 
ductions. Inc.. of Cincinnati for 
release on a syndicate plan in the 
fall. 

Films recently completed include 
a training series for the Union Cen- 
tral Life Insurance Company, a 
one-reel religious series, and tele- 
\ ision commercials for the Gruen 
Watch Co. and Wholesale Flower 
Growers" Association, and a syndi- 
cated series for banks. 

Davis & Geek Adds 1 1 Surgical 
Films in Color to Its Library 

* Eleven new 16nun surgical films, 
for professional use only, are an- 
nounced bv Dwis \ Gkck. Inc.. 57 
Willoughby St.. Brooklyn 1, N. Y. 
Prints, in color, are available from 
the Surgical Film Library on a 
free loan basis, to hospitals, medi- 
cal schools ( signature of a licensed 
physician required I. nurses train- 
ing schools and other accredited 
medical and surgical groups. 

All the films are silent except the 
one noted in the following listing 
of titles: 

Stricture oj the Ctnnmon Bile 
Duct, Sutfiical Treatment of Ar- 
teriovenous Aneuysms, Biceps Ten- 
don Transference. One Staf^e Ripht 
Hemirolerlomy. Transthoracic I a/i- 
ecloniy. Direrliculectomy. Suhlnlnl 
Gastrectomy for Intractahle Duo- 
ilenal I' leer. Excision Anal Fissure, 
Fistulectomy and Hemorrhoidec- 
tomy, Complete Exenteration oj the 
I'eltis and Ihpertension Due to 
I'hcochromocytoma ( sd I . 

Drug Store's Photo Department 

* \\ hat a photographic section can 
do for the sales volume of a drug 
store is pointed up in the recently 
completed Eastman Kodak Com- 
I'ANY film This Can Happen to You, 
produced for showitig l» drug as- 
sociations and allied groups. 



40 



BUSINESS SCREEN M.\(;.\ZINE 



THE EASIESTM 



ife^ 



Projecting 

Lecture Material 

Ever Devised! 



VACUMATIC 
PLATEN* 




POINTEX* 
PROJECTION POINTER 



Bcscler's revolutionary FEED-0-MATIC - feature on the new \L'-l-^ TH Opaijue 
Projector permits continuous, smooth projection of mounted or unmounted material. 

Think of it! You simply feed your lecture material as /v onto the metal conveyor 
hcit of the FEED-O-MATIC. and advance it into projection position by turning a 
handle. There is no special need to mount copy, or insert it into holders — because the 
unique platen of this ultramodern projector holds nil copy material absolutely flai. 

You can feed mixed or continuous copy through evenly, and without light flashes — 
since the platen is not raised or lowered. A full S'^xll page or a postage stamp are 
projected with equal case. There is no curl or flutter. As new copy is fed m at the left 
side of the projector, preceding copy is ejected from the right side. Thus you obtain un- 
interrupted projection — which aids tremendously in the efficient presentation of mixed 
copy, and proves eminently suitable for continuous copy in scroll form. 

The FEED OMATIC CONVEYOR is one of the exclusive Beseler developments 
that make the VL'-l.YTE the easiest opaque projector in the world to use — ideal for 
schools, churches, clubs, and business. .And there are many other outstandmg VULYTE 
features that team to help you obtain peak performance with maximum ease. 



1. YOU CAN ui* Ih* VU-IYTE in a parllally- 
lighltd room. Tolot dorltnttt it not n*c*>tary 
in ordar to obtain clvor, thorp imagot and 
brilliont tolort — btcavl* VU-IYTE previdot 
• xfro illumination. 

2. YOU CAN VI* copy "ot i«" — without 
mounting or intorting into holdori. Tho 
uniqut B>l<l«r VACUMATIC PLATEN* holdt 
all copy obtoiufff/y flal during projtction. A 
full 8 Villi pago lottor or a pottag* ttomp 



THE NEW 



t - 



— OPAQUE PIOJECTOI 



•fit. PtnJ. 





CHARLES 



con b* proj*ct«d with oquol oott, without 
curl or fluttor. 

3. YOU CAN projoct o lightod arrow onto 
ony port of th* illutlrotion by moont of tho 
n»w B>t*l<r built-in POINTEX* POINTEK — 
thofoby pointing out dttailt without looving 
tho projtfctor. 

4. YOU CAN ul> VU-IYTE on on un««*n 

furfoc* pr0|t<t on tmoll or lorgo tcr««nt. 

In oddition, VU-LYTE it on omoiingly quitt 
and cool oporoting pro|«ctor. 



'I hcsc advanced, exclusive features, plus others, 
arc incorporated in a proicclor that weighs only 
35 lbs and is REDUCED IN PRICE. 
Ask for Irrr Jrmonslralion of the precision built 
VU-LYTF. in your <>»n projmion rtHnn. And for 
more information regarding this truly new conccpC 
in opaque protection, ask for booklet — V 



0Cj<^^(5^^C>i> C O M P A N 



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Tk» World't lorgolt Mann fac f aror *« Opaqa* frafactlaa fqatpaaaf 






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\ 1)1,1 MK 12 • nil 



tl 



Ford Color Film on Workmanship 
Publicizes Arts Awards Contest 

♦ Tifiiig-in willi the 1- lUlu MuTOK 
Company's ofFer of 835,000 in cash 
prizes and nine all-oxponsi'-paid 
trips to Delroil and Dcarliorn. 
Mich., for studonls |iartic'i|>iitiii>: in 
the \')ril Industrial Arts Awards, 
is a new 20-ininute 16nnn color 
motion picture, Prule of Workman- 
ship. The Ford Fihn Library and 
the company's repioiiai public re- 
lations oflices in New ^ ork City. 
^'ashin>!ton. 1). C, Richmond. 
Calif.. Kansas City. Mi>-, and Chi- 
cago are releasing the production 
nationally this month. 

\^'ilh its stor\ based iipuM a la>l 
Near entrant whose wciodworkiiifr 
ability drew widespread attention. 
the film shows how thousands of 
students in junior and senior higli 
school classes acquire mechanical 
skills and craflsnianshif). The film 
was made for showin-; in schools 
and before civic groups and chnrcli 
clubs. 

Hancock Insurance Co. Films Its 
Village and New Office Building 

♦ Two new color productions spon- 
sored by the John Hancock Ml- 
TIAL Life Insiranck Company are 
Faith in Our Future, 15-minute 
story of the 228-home Hancock 
Village within commuting distance 
of Boston, and On These Founda- 
tions, tracing the construction of 
the company's new office building 
in The Hub. 

Three narrators in the construc- 
tion story are a "sidewalk superin- 
tendent.'' who tells the history of 
the site, a construction worker, and 
a clerical employee. The other pro- 
duction presents the housing de- 
velopment as a modern replica of 
the old. neighborly \ew England 
village. 

Both films are available for free 
showing by addressing the Photo- 
graphic Bureau. John Hancock Mu- 
tual Life Insurance Company. 200 
Berkeley .St.. Boston 17, .Mass. 

22 Lighting "Recipes" In G.E. Film 

♦ The first furnishetl home using 
all 22 new home light-conditioning 
"recipes'* of the General Electric 
Company is featured in Father Sees 
the lAjiht, 12-ininutc film to be 
made available in 16mm through 
the .34 sales districts of the G.E. 
Lami" Division, the sponsor. 

The film was shown simultane- 
ously at a private press preview in 
Cleveland and befr>re 800 utility 
sales executives at a television ses- 
sion of the Edison Electric Insti- 
tute's annual sales conference at 
the Edgewater Beach Hotel in Chi- 
cago. The production is designed 
for pr'>entation on television and 



ON THE PRODUCTION LINE 

NEWS OF BUSINESS FILMS AND THEIR USE IN FIELD 



at consumer, civic and trade or- 
ganization gatherings. 

New Training Films Apply 
Psychology In Human Relations 

^ \ isual iniplt'iiicntatioii of applied 
psychology in human relations, for 
personnel training in banking, in- 
surance, and in selling a new prod- 
uct, is turning sponsors more and 
more to films as their best frie?i<l. 
All three fields are represented in 
the latest production projci Is of 
Rocket Pictures, Inc. 

A March release. Help Yourself, 
is the first of a .series of slidefilnis 
which The Hank of America will 
present to its staffs in -100 branches, 
with emphasis on the fact that the 
employe is benefiting himself for 
life in his dealings. 

For The Pacific Mutual Life In- 
surance Company the Rocket staff 
is writing and producing a pro- 
gram pointed toward indoctrina- 



tion of frcslimen pi-rsonnel. Specify 
Snioolhediir, sounil and color slide- 
film for The Roberts C<iinpany of 
Los Angeles, explains to architects, 
builders and dealers all about the 
proiluit. a patented device for lay- 
ing wall-to-wall carpeting without 
floor tacks or nails. 

Pontiac Silver Anniversary Film 

♦ The Silver Anniversary of the 
I'oMiAc MoTOK Division of the 
General Motors Corporation, is 
commemorated with the release of 
Throuph the Years, 16mm Koda- 
cliroine film produced by the 
SoiNDFiLM Studios. Inc.. of De- 
troit. From introductory early 
scenes the action moves to today's 
manufacture, with a car coming off 
the as.sembly line every 58 seconds. 
Pontiac dealers, equipped with Bell 
6i Howell projectors, are handling 
Nical public showings. 




John Cameron Swazey 
in Film Series for Zenith 







'fyfsJsS^r^ 



Wa'd be pleated to screen 
some of our latest produc- 
tions for you. No obligation. 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO 
HOUYWOOO 



SLIDEFILMS • MOTION PICTURES 
TELEVISION COMMERCIALS 



New Film for "Voice of America"; 
Three for Venezuela Showings 

♦ lor till- "N'oicc of .America pr< 
gram of the U. S. Department c 
State is the new 20-minute junio 
Chamber of Continene motion pit 
ture shot in .35min by the Knickf.J 
IKX.KKK PhOIJI CTIONS, Inc. \e' 

York. Howard A. Ix-sser producet 
with direction by Peter Glushaiiol 

Three 16-35inni black and whit 
films, shot in V<Miezuela, have bee 
iimipleted by the company fo 
(;H)KA iConscjo Interamericaii 
dc Educacion Alimenlicia I . nutr 
tion education agency sponsore 
by the Venezuelan Government an 
the Amkrican Intkknational As 
sociATloN headed by Nelson A 
Rockefeller. 

The productions, Cookinp H\ 
jiiene. Food for a Stronp; People an- 
The Home Food Supply, were dirci 
ted b\ Victor D. Solow. The iiai 
ration is Spanish, with native fol 
music background. With six truck> 
the Cr)uncil is showing the films i: 
villages, ranches and other isolate 

settlements. 

I 

Mr. Tux Tells Marathon Jobbers 
How to Sell Dispenser Services 

♦ The aiiiinated Mr. Tux sparks tin 
jobber salesmen of the MaRATII" 
Corporation towards new go.i 
for the Tux dispenser napkins aii' 
service in Tips about Tux, sour: 
slidefilm produced by the All 
Film Corp. 

The training package, besides I 
film and record, has promotioi 
and review material, a group le.i 
er's guide and an easel presentati' 

Receptionist Film Made Available 
Through Bell System Offices 

♦ Private businesses now have 
opportunity to train their recepti- 
desk i)ersoniiel by film, with I 
lU.l.l. Sv.sTKM.s general release 
the 20-minute sound motion )• 
lure The Invisible Receplioin 
wlii(li the telephone company li 
used in training and refresh 
courses for its own PBX stafT. A 
pK to the nearest Bell compa: 
olli< e. )X II.DING PlCTl RE ProDI 

TioNS. Inc.. made the film. 

Gutermuth Slidefilm Sells Arketex 

♦ In circulation in the sales .r 
advertising department of the Aik 
tex Ceramic Corporation of Bra/il 
Ind.. is a 30-minute color and soum 
slidefilm program made by Clar 
cnce 11. Gutermuth. producer " 
Screen .\rt Pictures, of Fort \^'ayiic 
Th<' Arketex concern is one of tin 
largest manufacturers of ceraini' 
glazed structural tile in the I nitc. 
Slates and operates two large til' 
plants and clay pits at Brazil. . 



42 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAt;AZI^^ 




NUMBKR S • \ (II I MK I J • I'l. I 



43 



PIBi >r IPl[iC>IDW(O^S) 



The Latest in Audio-Visual Equipment and Accessories 

exhibitor aiilliorizcs thp servic-o toiii- 
[uiiiv lo usf DO-97 ratiiijis wilhiti 
I he scope of Kegulntioii 4 of llir 
National I'roiliiclion Aullioi itv. 



Da-Lite Introduces New Screen 
For Three-Oimensional Pictures 

* Tilt' Da- 1. ill- Slcri'o Screen for 
ihrce-iliniensioniil piclnres, intro- 
iliiced hv the 1)\I,ITK ScRKKN Co.. 
Inc.. 2703 N. Pulaski Rd.. Chicago 
3*>. has these construction features: 
}{(l-|Miint display board (3 32" 
thick I . clear coated back side, sil- 
ver coated projection surface. 1 rt" 
black border. -Ul ' x 40 " overall, 
dual-ea.seled back with stifleners. 
wall hanging or table use, light- 
weight (95 1, and self-storing con- 
tainiT. The screen is priced at 
$14.9.S. 

War Testing Proves Durability of 
B & H Cameras in the Field 

♦ Cameras going to war must not 
only be tough soldiers but also must 
dress the part. When the 70DE 
and Auto I.oad models of Bell & 
Howell 16mrn cameras went inlu 
the Signal Corps recentlv. the first 
step was to doff the leather and 
chromium finishes and don olive 
drab, with speeial low reflection 
black paint over the metal surfaces. 
The .Auto Load is taken up by 
cameramen in small artillery spot- 
ting planes. Both types are used b\ 
Armed Services branches on the 
ground and in the air, and by war 
correspondents. 

The company reported that its 
100 cameras used in the Bikini 
atom bomb test functioned 96 per 
cent perfect, despite temperature 
ranges from 120° F. on the runways 
down to 40° below zero at high alti- 
tudes. The cameras are subjected by 
the ."Signal Corps to life tests, vibra- 
tion, drop, temperature and other 
tests simulating conditions found in 
combat. Fungus-proof materials to 
permit instant use after long storage 
in hot and damp climates are a 
development from World War II. 

Do-Lite Promotes Gardner 

♦ IUak I'. (Midi (Auiimh. nanicd 
assistant sales manager of ihi- l)\- 
LiTE ScREK.N Company, I.\< .. of 
Chicago, has been covering the 
midwest, east and south for the 
company as sales representative 
since 1946. 

RCA Simplifies Parts Priorities 

* \ «iiiiplilii-il iiii-iliM,) of i-xti-ndiiij; 
ItO-97 priority ratings for needed 
maintenance, repair and operating 
materials has been instituted by the 
\{C..\ Skkvick CoMPA.nv for exhibi- 
tors using the compan>'s parts plan 
contracts. By signing and mailing 
ihe return card attached to an ex- 
planatory card already issued, the 



Telejector Is New Audio & Video 
TV Spot and Show Equipment 
♦ Telejector is the name of a new. 
completely portable 7iiO-w'att. 
lOnmi motion [licture projector for 
TV spots and shows, available from 
the Audio & Video Products Corp.. 
16.i0 Broadway, .New York City 19. 
A built-in right angle picture 
llirou and a foldaway screen, the 
same size as the picture lube of a 
12'-.' inch TV receiver and masked 
In >iMiulale the effect of viewing in 
the home, are features. The pro- 
jector has its own sound track ain- 
pl'fier and loudspeaker. 



Westrex's Magnetic Recording 
Has a New Line of Amplifiers 

♦ \ fcaliiic n( the WkSTKKX CoR- 
1'((1(\j|(in"s |9.')1 Series IlOO Stand- 
ard Magnetic Kecording Systems is 
a new line of amplifiers and trans- 
iiiissioii i'(]nipment with exception- 
alK low noise to get maximum 
rc>ulls from the inherent signal-to- 
lioise ratio of magijclic fdm. The 
circuit has three amplifiers: two 
microphone pre-amplifiers and one 
main recording amplifier. 

Kach of the systems, fixed studio 
or portable, for 3.^. 17':; "r 16mrn 
magnetic film, includes two dy- 
namic microphones, a microphone 
floor stand, a 2-position mixer- 
transmission unit, a magnetic re- 
((irding machine containing the 
|)ower unit and auxiliary ecjuip- 
ment. a complete set of spare glass- 
ware and fuses, and interconnect- 
ing cable for operation from single 
|)hase, .50 or 60 cycles 115 volt 
power source. The magnetic re- 





ff est rex Series ] 10(1 Recorder 

(•order also <an be supplied for 
operation from a three-phase. .">() or 
60 cycle synchronous motor, an in- 
terlock motor, or a multi-duty com- 
bination 220 volt, three-phase syn- 
chronous or 96 volt UC control 
motor- The Davis flutter suppressor 
is used. 

The mixer-amplifier is a small 
portable unit containing all the am- 
plifiers and equalizing transmission 
equipment and has two microphone 
input positions, each with mixer 
control and dialogue equalization. 
There is a high |)recision volume 
indicator besides high-qualil) low 
impedance headset monitoring for 
either direct or magnetic monitor- 
ing from the magnetic monitoring 
head in the recording machine. The 
complete system weighs 17.") [Xiunds. 

SMPTE PROCEEDINGS: 

I C O N T I M E D FROM PACE 1 I 

au(lilor\ perspective, by H. G. Ko- 
brak. .VI. D., University of Chicago. 

MoTio.N Picture Tech.mqles 
Motion picture techniques were 
the subject Monday evening, with a 
paper on the processing of 16mm 
Kodachrome. by W. Hedden, T. 
Weaver and Lloyd Thompson of the 
Calvin Co.: duplication of color 
images with narrow band filters, 
K. J. Ross. National Film Board of 
Canada: operation of a small studio. 
Morton H. Read. Bay State Film 
Productions; the independent frame 
technique of J. Arthur Hank, by 
\A. Col. G. R. Stevens. London: and 
I urrcnt arc lamp lighting, bv V\ . J. 
Henham. RCA Victor. 

The convention's opening session 
was on film and processing, with 
papers by Edgar E. Berger and 
F. L. Bray of Du-Arl Film Labora- 
tories. L. Katz and W . F.slhimer of 
Matheon Mfg. Co.. H. F. llewston 
of I . S. Naval Ordnance, and W. G. 
Mill of Ansco. 

Fi I.I, Day On Television 
Ml Tuesday sessions were given 
111 television, with the afternoon 
meeting at the Bell Ti-lephone I,ab- 
oratories in Murray Hill, N. J. 
I liursdav forenoon's papers were 
for the most part on theatre light- 
ing and production techniques. , 



44 



Bl'SINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



RCA Names John J. Dostal 
OS Sound & Visual Manager 

♦ The <i|i|i»iiiliMiMit !•( John 
I J. DosTAL as sali-s iiianagiT 

for KCA Sound a.mj Visual 
i Products has been c-onfirnied 
by A. R. Hopkins, General 
Sales Manager of llie KCA 
Engineering Products Depart- 
ment. 

Since 1948, Mr. Oostai has 
been manager of field sales 
(or the Visual Products ."sec- 
tion of the departiiu-nl. Kor- 
merlv associated with Sinnid 
Serilier Corporation. Hart- 
ford, Conn., he has served as 
a captain in the U. S. Army 
Signal Corps during World 
War II. In recent years he 
has Ix'en particularly active 
in the visual field. His dy- 
namic sales training presenta- 
tions have been outstanding 
features of recent National 
Audio Visual Association re- 
gional and national gather- 
ings and he is chairman of 
the board of governors in 
charge of NAVA's Sales In- 
stitute at Indiana I niversitv. 

Far East Command Veteran 
Addresses OeVry Employees 

* "Our Korean war bases an- 
almost totally devoid of an\ 
form of entertainment for ouj 
troops with the exception of 
motion pictures," dcclareil 
Captain C. W. Huff, execu- 
tive officer of the Photo- 
graphic Division of the Far 
Elast (iiimmand in an address 
to more than l.'iO (!liica^o 
employees of the DkVry COR- 
PORATION on May 14. 

"Training films used out 
there are saving the lives of 
Ameri<'an boys as well as 
lhos«' of our allies every day. 

Huff, who was flown to 
Chicago from Washington for 
the event, has just returned 
for a .'10-day s|M"cial mission 
and has l)een in the F"ar Kasl 
(or the [Mist 16 months. His 
visit was es(Mi'iall\ iiia<ie to 
the DeVry plant l)ecau.«e the 
firm is heavily engaged in 
production of the new JAN 
(Joint Army -Navy I e<|uip- 
ineiit now replacing othiT 
lyjies of motion picture pro- 
jretion e<|uipment in llic 
armed services. 



TUMHtHO-Jj 



si^tis 




The Long Awaited, Sensational.,, 




MORTON 

SOUNDMflSTER 

16 MM Sound-On-Film Camera 
for INDUSTRY and COMMERCE 



The Morton Soundmaster is the product of 
over five years intensive research, design, and 
engineering. In it hove gone oil the proven 
features in electronics and sound engineering 
that ore resultant from wartime and postwar 
advances. A sound camera designed primarily 
for amateur rather than professional use. Its 
simplicity of operation, versatility, durability 
and remarkably low price combine to make 
it the greatest innovation in motion pictures 
since color. 



* SimpU syftfvm for sound r«<ord!ng. 
Singte-knob tuning, eoty to optrot* 

> Finished film runt on any standard 
1 6mm projector 

* Turret front holding thrsa C mount 
tenses. 

* 200-foot Holiywood-type outside 
mogozines for doy-light loading. 



• Completely botlery operated for use 
indoors or out with NO OTHER 
SOURCE OF POWER NEEDED 

• Amplifier ond batteries self-con 
toined in o tingle case. 

• Vorioble density sound-recordmg 
system. 

• Film costs exoctly the some as those 
for 16mm silent film 

• Covers wide soundwonge from 60 
to 6000 cycles. 



* Accurole opticol viowfinder to 
match 15mm, 25mm. and 
75 mm lenses. Parallax adjust- 
ment 

* Geared footage meter 

* Sturdy, light-weight>aluminum 
body with oil working parts 
mode of either stamless steel 
or brass 




COMMIICiAl riOOUCt 

DtMONttlAtiOM 



00 



THE l/ f!<yUOtl— CO. 

86 SOUTH SIXTH STREET 
MINNEAPOLIS 2, MINNESOTA 



PRESENTATIONS. TREATIHENTS. 
COMPLETE SHOOTING SCRIPTS 

GERALD BLANK 

194 60B 64lh Av» 

Frnlt Meadows. L. I . N Y 

JA 6 4220 TE 8 7174 



IIIIIU) 1,1)11 HiN tll^ nil I\|)| \ Ol^ IKMMN*. I ll,M> NOW \\ Ml. Mill 



♦ The Thirtl Kdilion of The Index of I'raininp 
Kilnis. widely-usrcl and authoritative reference 
listing all free-loan, rental and Ioh-c<»I purchase 
-oiinil rilni<- nnd <>li(lefilm« nvnilnhle for industrial 



training and viM-alional classroom usr is not* axad- 
ahlr. NearU 28(N) titles are listed, together with 
coniplclp "Miurrrs. Till: Im>E\ liMs at onU $2.(V). 
Oriirr lodin from MlM>t»s SiHl>\. Chirngo II. 



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45 




BUSINESS SCREEN EXECUTIVE 



Vincent L. Herman 



Vincent Herman Heads New TV 
Department of Jam Handy in N. Y. 

♦ VlNCKNT I,. IIkh.MVN. a director 
of 'I'liK Jam Handy Okga.mzation 
for many years, has been appointed 
vice president in charpr of telc- 
\ ision operations. 

A New York tcle\isioii depart- 
ment lias been eslai)lislied. with 
separate production facilities there, 
to make TV commercials and filmed 
programs. 

Vice President Herman's execu- 
tive staff has William I'skali as 
production executive and Frank 
Sea\er account executive. 

Princeton Film Center Appoints 
Barlass General Soles Manager 

♦ Jack Barlass. named executive 
vice president and general sales 
manager of The Princeton Film 
Center. Inc.. has been general pro- 
motion manager of the Meredith 
Publishing Company, in charge of 
public relations, the book sales de- 
partment and special consumer pro- 
motion projects. He will divide his 
time l)etwcen Princeton. N. J., and 
New ^ ork City. 

Richard A. Walsh to Jam Handy 

♦ Richard A. Wal.sh. now with 
the photoplays unit of The Jam 
HaM)^ Okcamzatio.n. has been a 
motion picture writer and director 
in Holl\\\ood and for the armed 
forces. 

Dean Is Ideal's Chicago Manager; 
Young Succeeds Him In Atlanta 

♦ George E. Dean has been pro- 
moled to manager of the main ofTice 
of the Ideal Pictures Corp.. in Chi- 
cago, and Robert ^ oung succeeds 
him in the Atlanta managership. 
Robert I). F'aber, New York man- 
ager, has returned after a year's 
leave of absence. 

The Los Angeles ofTice is now al 
2y.i() \X'. .Seventh St., unrler the di- 
rcilion of Scott W. Hillam. In 
Oklahoma Citv the new address is 
1.36 N.W. l.sih St.. and the Salt 
Lake Cil\ office has moved to .S4 
Post Office Place. 



Howard Johnson Heads M.P. Unit 
of U. S. Civil Defense Division 

* Howard H. II. JohnxiM. producer 
and director whose films won 
awards in l<)Wi and I'M'! at the 
Venice I'ilni I'c-liwd. has been 
named chief of the iiiution picture 
branch of the Public AITairs l)i\i- 
sion of the Federal (!ivil Defense 
Administration. 

Johnson set up the Navy a-\ 
training program in the Central 
Pacific in World War II and later. 
as a civilian emplovee of the Navy 
Photographic Center, he produced 
more than ■!() motion pictures for 
training and public information, in 
the I'nited States, Alaska and Pan- 
ama. He is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Vermont. 

Golden Names Burrows Consultant 

♦ Lincoln V. Burrows of the 



Eastman Kodak CoMi>ANV has 
been selected by Nathan P. Golden 
to be consultant to the NPA Motion 
Picture-Photographic Products Di- 
vision. Burrows, who in World 
War II headed the photographic 
section in WPBs consumers durable 
goods division, is to advise the 
Golden group regarding sensitized 
film, motion picture and photo- 
graphic |)r<iducts. 

Tom Curtis to Jam Handy, Chicago 

♦ Tom I\. (ilHTis, formerly vice 
president of the Atlas Fii.M COR- 
PORATION, has joined The Jam 
Handy Organization as motion pic- 
ture consultant for the Chicago area. 
Besides production experience with 
the Columbia Pictures (Corporation. 
Curtis saw service for three years in 
the U. S. Army Signal Corps film 
studio. 



U^toducers of QJine 

1 1 Lotion [Pictures 

Since igi6 

DE FRENES 
COMPANY 

1909 BUTTONWOOD STREET 
PHILA. 30. PA. RIttcnhouse 6-1686 



35MM • 16MM 
COLOR • B & W 




Elliott Pew . . . heads sales for 
Unifilnis, N. Y. film producer. 



Ross Roy Names Harry Stalley 
Director of Creative Art Work 

♦ Aihanicd li> senior art director 
of Ross Roy, Inc., Harry C. Stalley 
will direct all creative art work, 
and the department's persoimel, of 
the advertising agency. Stalley has 
been with the company a nund)er 
of years. 

David Hubbell Succeeds Gates 
As Kodak's Director of Training 

♦ \. Dwii) III iini;i.r., named direc- 
tor c)f training of the East.man Ko- 
dak Company, succeeds Allen B. 
Gates, who continues membership 
on the management staff as con- 
sultant on training to the general 
management. Gates was training di- 
rector for 20 years. 

The training section is being 
merged with the industrial relations 
department under Craig P. Coch- 
rane, director of industrial rela- 
tions. 

Hubbell was an associate profes- 
sor at Pennsylvania State College 
before he joined Eastman in 1926. 
He has been on the executive staff 
and assistant training director since 
1946. 

Audio & Video Representative 

♦ W II. MAM 11. IIaZI.ETT, ap|)ointed 
field representative in the Eastern 
Seaboard for the .AlDio & \U)E0 
Products Corporation, will dem- 
onstrate a complete line of profes- 
sional sound reproducing equip- 
ment and will act as liaison between 
the company and specialized indus- 
tries engaged in data and telemeter 
recording projects. 

Applebaum Returns "Home" 

♦ Louis .Vpplcbaum. compo.'icr. has 
returned as music consultant to the 
Canadian National Film Board, 
which he seived as senior composer 
from 19-12 I.. 19lf). lb- will devote 
four months a year to the Board's 
activities and continue with his 
work in radio. I'. S. entertainment 
films, and composing. 



46 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



Alexander Is Safety Council's 
Industrial Department Head 

♦ CllAia.l.> ^. Al.K\AM)l.l(, noH 

manager of the Industrial Depart- 
ment of the National Safety 
(!i)l Ncll.. was assistant general man- 
:iger nf inanufacluriiig for the 
(!lierr)-Hurreli Corp.. where he also 
was roonlitiator of production tiieth- 
ods and defense contracts. 

In ac(|uiring his experience in 
industrial production, engineering, 
foreman training and sales. Alex- 
ander also .serveil two years as 
senior engineer with George Krye 
and Associates and ten years with 
the Buick Motor Division of Gen- 
eral Motors Gorp. 

Pointing to the nei'd of conserva- 
tion of manpower amidst the gear- 
ing of the national economy to 
defense effort. President Ned H. 
Dearhorn of the Council said Alex- 
ander's background fits him to head 
up the (iouncil's program for fur- 
ther reduition of industrial acci- 
dent losses, and added that "there 
are important segments of industr\ 
where accident prevention has re- 
ceived less attention than it de- 
s«'rves." 

Benavie Addresses Purdue Clinic 

* rechrii(|ues of applying music to 
industrial motion piitures were dis- 
cussed h\ Samuel J. Benavie. direc- 
tor of music for TllK Jam Hand^ 
Orcamzation, at a Purdue I niver- 
sity Clinic April 14-16 on music 
for better living, on and off the jol>. 

B & H Magazine Camera Record 

* Com{>letion of manufacture of it^ 
25().(KX>th Uimm magazine camera 
is being observed by the Bell \ 
Howell Co.. 7100 McCormick Rd.. 
Chicago 4sS. III., with special prices 
for both the Auto Load and the 
Auto Master models. Formal pre>- 
entatioH was made by K. 1.. Ghyr- 
chel, works manager, at a meeting 
of cxe«ulives in the home of Presi- 
dent C. H. Percy. 

Sherman Handles Norse Films 

* .\l. SiiKHVMN. named L nitiil 
States distributor of all Norwegiati 
Governmr-nt dims, has opened of- 
fices nt l(>12 Wisconsin a\e.. \\\. 
in Washington. 1). C. 



You can buy titles for less than 
KNIGHT QUALITY sells for, but 
you cannot get greater value at 
any price. That's why our titles 
cost less in the long run. 

THE KNIGHT STUDIO 

341 E.Ohio Street. Chiogo 11. Illinois 



Oavies ot Princeton Film Center 
♦ Kii\v\i(u A. Davies. who has 
headed his own television film pro- 
ducing company, has j<iined TliE 
Pri.nceton Film Center. I.nc, as 
middle .\tlanlic district sales man- 
ager. 



TELEVISION TALK 

Setup for Low Budget TV Spots 

♦ .\ studio at Bsron, inc., in Wash- 
ington, D. C, has been equipped 
with a pre-set microphone and per- 
manently placed lighting fixturi-> 
for low-budget TV sound fdiiiing 
service, to news commentators, con- 
gressional reporters, political speak- 
ers and TV advertisers. .'\ one- 
minute sync-!»ound spot, editeil and 
coiripii-li'. i> iIi'IImti-iI fur .S2.1. 

First in Melchior TV Series Shot 

♦ A series of 13 half-hour TV 
musicals for fall relea.se. the first of 
which has been completed by l,au- 
ritz Melchior and Mrs. Melchior. 
will be produced on film by Sarra. 
Inc. The series will be sold for 
regional sponsor-ihip. 

TV Spots in Department Store 

♦ Television films made in a de- 
partment store marked the fur stor- 
age campaign of Sterling-Lindner- 
Davis of Cleveland, unit of Allied 
Stores Corp. Three TV^ stations 
sharci! 17 sdiind-oii-filtn sjMit-. 
Television in the Everglades 

♦ .\ cast of 17 professional players 
has been in the Kverglades of 
Florida shooting Call of the Ever- 
eladi:^ for teieyision release. 
Zenith Claims Phonevision Success 

♦ ('oncluding first test phase of 
Phonevision. Zenith Radio officials 
point to high percentage of paid 
"attendance" and claim a success- 
ful ileiimn-itration. 



DON'T WASTE FILM STOCK 

Save Retakes-Develop Your Own! 

Anybody can run it! 

BRIDGAMATIC costs little 
more than old-faihioned. cum- 
bersome, slow acting rack 
and tank processing meth 
ods. This low cost automatic 
film developing machine 
saves valuable lime, protects 
your precious negatives. 
Speeds up your entire pro- 
duction routine. Straight 16mm 
or 16 35mm combination mod- 
els, negative positive or re- 
versal up to SS79S plus tax. 
Develop and dry ready lor 
showing your own spot news- 
reel same day events occur. 
TV stations, small labs., edu- 
cational institutions, film pro- 
ducers, microlilmera have 
proven BHIDGAMATIC m the 
lield for several years. 

Completely self contained 
with patented overdrive, air 
squeegees, built m drybox. 
healing elements, plastic lined 
steel tanks. No special skill 
required lor operating attach 
rubber hose and plug in.' 

AGENTS FOR: Acm« Animotion, Blue Seal Rccorderi. D«pu« Printer*. F«orl«tt D«lll«t. 
Auricon 16mm line, Maqnoqram Synchronowi Rncorden, lUoqnecordvri. Smitti Vlvw- 
fiiuttri. Colortron Litei. Bodde Screens. Hollywood frin»er». Zoomor CiM tolowttor 
Leni. Kinevoi Synchronoui Moqnetic Recorderi. Mole Ricllarduia LiollH. MANY 
ITEMS AVAILABLE ON TIME PAYMENTS. 




HHIIH. iMATIC 2lt, H. fiotilitr film 
sfteed ISim' iirr hour $24tS plut lax 
lirilhoul rxlraai 



BKIDGAMAIII J l{. SI 01)0 -::: 



itr •■■(! lab* . ••••tiv* %\m %9* 



S. 0. S. CINEMA SUPPLY CORP. 



0ep< H 
to: W S2>d SI 

Ne» York II 



I K\\ COPIKS KKM V1MN(;()F"I'K()1)1 ClloN |{K\ IKW" ISSl K 

♦ From the large over-run of the recent Business Scree.v annual report 
on I. S. and Canadian "Production Resources" I Is.sur Two. 1').t1 i a 
few copies remain for single copv sales to sponsors and agencies. Send 
mail or telegraph orders at One Dollar (x-r cop\, p<ist|>aid. to the (!hi- 
cago Oflice of Publication. Business Screen. \7-A\ K. Suju-rior. Chicago 
11, Illinois. Orders filled while sup)>l\ lasts. 



/1 2uaAiei o/ OncUidi . . . 



Films we wrote in 1950 have been honored by . . . 

■k THE EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 

• THE VENICE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 

• THE COMMITTEE ON FILMS FOR SAFETY 

• THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 



^c/u/pti Bi^ OcAJie^ie Q nxA^nciucx:^ 



THE COMPLETE FILM WRITING SERVICE 

GUARANTEED ACCEPTABILITY 



709 ATLANTIC SLDC. 



930 r STRtET NW * WASHINGTON 4. D. C. 
* IN NIW TORK. INTIRPtlSI «S3S * 



IXICUTIVI J94I 



N I M B F. R 3 



\ iM.t M t I : • i<(.-.i 



COMPIETEIY ^ i 

rf SOUND 

RECORDING SERVICES 

now available to producers of 
16 mm Business — Educational — 
and Religious Films. 

I 

I SYNCHRONOUS Va" MAGNETIC 

I TAPE RECORDING CHANNEL 

I 

I 16 mm MAGNETIC FILM 

I RECORDING CHANNEL 

j 16 mm MULTIPLE TRACK DIRECT- 
j POSITIVE RECORDING CHANNEL 

I SIX CHANNEL MIXER 

I FOR RE- RECORDING from 

. V* Magnetic Tape — Magnetic 
I and Photographic 16 mm Films, 
j Synchronous Disc Recordings. 

GEO. W. COIBURN 
LABORATORY, INC. 

164 NORTH WACKER DRIVE, CHICAGO 6, lUINOIS 

EJge-Sumhertd Work Prints ~ Color Masters — 
Duplicate Segatiies— Release Prints 



mC-MILD 



RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

It coHPOHariou 



Mtiunfiicturhi ^.- i 

SYNCHRONOUS DISC 
SYNCHRONOUS TAPE 
SYNCHRONOUS FILM 

Original Sound Truck 
Recorders' Diibbers'Iidilors 

WRITE: 

FAIRCHILD 

RECORDING EQUIPMENT 

CORPORATION 

1S4th STREET and 7lh AVENUE. 
WHITESTONE, NEW YORK 
PHONI: INDEPENDENCE 3-JIOO 



ltr</f lor Boot U I PS 7 uboul I'jir- 
child PicSync Tjpe Recorder. 

My name 

Company ., 

AddreiS 

rn- 12 



General Electric Previews New 

Picture On Advantages of 

Recreation Programs 

* MiiiiN natiiiniii civic clubs arc participaliii;^ in 
till- (icncral Kliilric (;(>iii|)any"s filiM-s|iaikc(l 
ii\ ic ini|irii\ciiicMl itrograin fin' (Icvcliiprnciit of 
corniiiiMiily rccrcaliiin. cii-s|)iiiis<)rc(l |i\ the Na- 
linnal Hccrcation ,\ssiiciation. 

I he sound motion picture, A Chance to Play, 
HJiich is lieiuf; rlistriijuled to conunuiiity and 
educational or<:ani/,ali<ins. is the most recent 
in the compatu's More I'otter lo America scries, 
riic 211-iniimlc production was made liy the March 
of Time under the technical super\ision of the 
association. The kit is purchasahle at a repro- 
duction cost of $37 by industrial and civic 
firoups i>ut the film is available on a one-time 
loan basis through the nearest General Klectric 
sales iillicp.* 

Hknkfits Shown By Many Exampi-es 
The manifold benefits of more playtime and 
belter recreational facilities to the individual, 
industry and the nation provide the theme of 
the motion picture. Supported by scenes shot 
from coast to coast the production proves pic- 
torially its point that municipalities, by their 
lack of foresight, are missing a readymade op- 
portunity to reduce traffic accidents, cut down 
dcliM(|uency and crime, and to build the moral 
and pb\sical health of the community. a<lults as 
Hcll as youngsters. 

In outdoor night scenes the production brings 
out the cooperation of progressive industrial 
companies in providing and maintaining lighted 
playing fields for employees, for experience has 
taught them, just as have the lunch hour film 
programs, that re<Tealion in the off-hours helps 
the worker to do a better job, develops team 
spirit, and decreases accidents and absenteeism. 
Final scenes emphasize that improvement of 
the recreational facilities of America is a re- 
sponsibilitv of civic leaders, and that evcr\ citi- 
zen should participate. 

An authoritative manual. "Recreation Is Ev- i 



16 mm 



( C O N T I .\ U E D ON 



ACE 



FIFTY I 



"Gcncr.-!! Electric Co.. Visual Instruction Section. 1 River 
Rd., Schenectady 5. .\.Y'. Mranch offices: 930 S.W. 6th .Ave.. 
Portland. Ore. ; liepartment ot" Visual Instruction, U. of 
California. Berkeley. Calif. ; 2.^5 Montgomery St., San Fran. 
Cisco. Calif.; 212 .\. Vigncs St., I^os .\ngeles. Calif.; 200 S. 
.Main St., Salt Lake City, I'tah: 650 17th St.. Denver, Colo.; 
1801 N. Lamar .St.. Dallas, IVx.is; 41tib Woodland Ave.. 
Cleveland, Ohio; 187 Spring .St.. N.W.. .Atlanta. Ga. ; 1405 
I..ocust Sl, Philadelphia, Pa. ; 570 Lexington .\ve.. New Y'ork 
City; 140 Federal St.. Boston, .Mass.; «40 S. Canal St.. 
Chicago. 111. 



TEACHERS 

LECTURERS 

DEMONSTRATORS 

No mora woodsn itick 
point«ril Ui« the Optical 
Po!nt«r up to 20 ft. from 
icr««n. 

POSTAGE 



PROJECT$_|WCHI 



ARROWHEAD 



Bright V«« of light cltdrlr points 
out lubjtct matter on screen! 
Bright lightl Light w«ight! Pits 
your hand! Send check or money 
order today! 

DCALCRS tNVITfO 



PREPAID 




$475 



Sk 



PATENT 
PENDING 



PENBERTHY INSTRUMENT COMPANY 

Oept. 14. 66i Adorns St., Seattle 8. Washington 




This Model 1 I <j 
Compco reel in the 
new 600 ft. (16mm.) 
size holds a complete 
15-minute sound or 
25-minutc silent program. It is clearly 
marked with scales for footage and for 
running time in minutes ... is durably 
made of high grade tempered steel, 
finished in scratch-resistant, baked-on 
hammertone gray enamel . , . and has 
the exclusive "Compco Clip" that 
makes threading fast and easy, even in 
the dark! Model 120 Film Can fits this 
reel. Fibre Shipping Cases also avail- 
able. Write tor catalog. 



2251 W. Si. Paul Ave. 
Chicogo 47 



CORPORATION 




For 16mm. Film — 400' lo 2000' Reeli 

Protect your films 

Ship in FIBERBILT CASES 

Sold at leading dealers 




I 



48 



Ul.>*INESS SCREKN M\(. A/INK 



• ONE OF A SKRIES ON M DIOVrSlIAL SERVICES • 

Their "Gadgt'ts " Help Mak<' Bitter Films 

IHK STOKY OF CHICAGO'S COLIURN I.AHOHVTOKV 



♦ Sup«-i-"'};ii<lgfts"' — four floors of 
iheni de»i>:iie(i and made by the 
company ti> meet special needs of 
I its customers and each a model of 
' compactnos that's the mind's e\e 
picture we carried awa) from a 
visit to the Cweo. W. Colburn Lab- 
oratory. Inc.. beehive of printin;;. 
recordin<! and title-making, in Chi- 
cago. 

Though he slill was digging his 
way out of ihe pileup of business 
that accumulated during his attend- 
ance at the New York spring 
meeting of the S.MPTE, before 
which he had described his new 
equipment for editing (|uarter-inch 
g)nchroni/ed magnetic tape. George 
Colburn conducted us on a one- 
man tour of the establishment 
which he o|KTates with three broth- 
ers. Bob. John and Francis, at 16-1 
N. Wacker Drive. 

AcTi\K IN ."^MFTF Affairs 
It's axiomatic that the busiest 
folk take on additional jobs and 
do them effectually. That must be 
true of Colburn. for he somehow 
finds lime to be chairman of the 
Central Section of the SMPTK and 
for years was its secretary and 
treasuriT. 

When we mentioned the compact- 
ness that characterized the many 
special devices he showed us. Ci>l- 
burn in the genial, affable and 
quiet wa\ of his 47 \ears smile<l 
something about having learned the 
value of space in a basement. 

And that's where the story of the 
laboratory starts- in the basement 
of his home at 722}'. \. Clark 
street, in \'>'V2 i though the ""yen" to 
work with projection of films was 
being exercised years earlier, as the 
illustration proves i . The first op- 
erations of Colburn's "company" 
were severely restricted to making 
enlargements from '>' jmm to 16. 
but that limitation wasn't to be for 
long. When Kmni film came out. he 



A SCRIPT SERVICE 



began making reductions from 16 
to 8, but orders were arriving be- 
fore he could get the attachtnent 
ready for his prititing nia<hiiie. 

Bob. the youngest brother, was 
working in a knitting mill in Min- 
nesota. \^ hen the mill offered him 
the job of night foreman, at a raise 
of SI 7 a month for the new respon- 
sibilities, he decided that was not 
for him. George and Mrs. Colburn 
had saved S.^tKl for a long-cher- 
ished trip to California, so Bob 
came in to take over. That was in 
I'W.S. The following spring the 
firm took space in the Merchandise 
Marl. Brother John, who was try- 
ing to work his way through col- 
lege, joined the brothers at this 
time. George, in addition to the 
print service, had been o[K'raling a 
poster service at the Palace theatre. 
W hen Snow While was billed in for 
eight weeks, goodbv poster work 
for the period, so he sold that 
business and went wholly into the 
laboratory activity. 

Ihe space leased in the Mart was 
not exactly pretentious. In the one 
room. '•) feet wide by 12 long and 
i! high, the Colburns were making 
print enlargements and reductions 
from a number of film sizes and 
doing some title work. Came Koda- 
chrome in 19.% and the laboralor\ 
was printing duplicates almost as 
earl> as the original film entered 
the field. Some sound still opera- 
tion also was undertake.!. The 
adjoining room was obtained and 
the wall broken through to provide 
llw first Colburn studio. 

Bl.sinf.ss Is On the Move 

(i^orge was busy building more 
|iiiiiters and pro<essing machines 
as the orders multiplied, and more 
space was taken. Then the Govern- 
ment moved into the Mart and 
wanted the entire floor. The build- 

l(:()>TI\tKI> ON VKCY. .S2 I 




Specializing in a creative 
approach to motion pictures. Production-wise 
shooting scripts and narrations on which spon- 
sors and producers can depend. 

SID A » EL — SCRIPTS 



1130 JEFFERSON PLACE N W 



WASHINGTON 6. C 



NATIONAL 1034 



.Vk.1 



® 



pur IT ■ 
ON nioMT! 



D« Luxa 
Chall«no»r 

Octagon cair 
Cryilal-Bvadvd 

ptctvr* wrfocr 
Lightwvighl 

«atr lo carry 





When you put on your showing of 
business films — motion pictures, shdes 
or filmslrtps — do the job right — use a 



li 




Send ^1 FREE 
Samfrte o/ 

OoLlte CryttolBeoded 
icreen fobric and copy of 
helpful brochure "Planning 
for Effective Projectior 



DA-LITE 

CRYSTAL-BEADED 
SCREEN 



Its millions of tiny crystal beads give 
your pictures theatre-quality brilliance 
and sharpness . . . (about 200'^ lo 
500'~r brighter than on a wall, sheet or 
makeshift screen!. The greater light 
reflective quality of the Da-l,ile Crystal 
Beaded surface brines out all the de- 
tails and fine gradations of lone and 
color thai the camera has captured. 

Your supplier ha> Da-Lite Screens in 
sizes and styles for every need. A«k (or 
a demonstration. 



The icTtem eXPERIENCB Built 
— fomous lor quality s/nce 1909 



vi.kkkAjJj. 






DA-LITE SCREEN COMPANY, INC. 



2 703 N. Pulaiki »oad 



NOW'. 



^rJfrfnTWr 



Ch'tago 39. Ilhno'i 

screen fabric and your brochure "Plannirtg for Kffcc- ' 

tivc Projection," , | 

.V-iitr.. j 

Firm Sjm,- . 

.IdJresi I 

Cti. / ■ . I 



SALES • SERVICE • RENTALS 

^RS 35 mm. • 16 mm. 

CAMERAS-MOVIOLAS^DOLLYS 

Complete Line of Equipment for Prodwtiom AvsiUble for RemtsI 

Mitchell: Standard - Hi-Spccd - NC - BNC - 16 mm. 

Bell & Howell: Standard • Shif tover • Eyemos 

Maitrer: 16 mm. Cameras 

Moviola: Editing Machines • Synchronizers 

SPECIALISTS IN ALL TYPES OF CAMERA REPAIK WORK. UNSB MOUNTED 



(7flni6Rfl fouipm^nT (o. 

N^ 1600 IKOHOlL'fli \ n(u iiHK cm ^'~-' 



RE\rTII\C TTTF 'HI. I i; < IIIP.«;" OF BISINFSS FIT 



AiT! 



♦ t-ipf miiri- lliaii a drc.iile. Ill >1- 
NESS St:RKKN has l>een the one 
national business jounial serving 
the s|>e<-ial interest of large and 



«inall luisiiiess firms utiliiing the 
full range of audio and visual tools 
for training, selling, and other 
puriMiw^, 8,n00 copies ihi* isaue. 



Nl.MBKR .1 • \Oi.l MK IJ • 1931 



49 



MOTION PICTURE AND TELEVISION 
PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT 

ARRIFLEX HEADQUARTERS 
Olract Factory Repreisntatives 

ArriflfX .'{r)nini llaii<kaim'i a. nu)di'l II. 
Built-in 12 volt motor and tachometer. 
Three matched Zeiss T-coated lenses. 
200' or -lOO' ma>razines available. 
Immediate Delivery. 

ARRIFLEX BUMP and SYNC MOTOR 

lieareil follow focus control. 
Retlex viewintr through the lens. 
Soundproof and liKhtweiRht. 
Tripods and hahy tripods with specially de- 
signed lemovable head in bayonet mount. 
All spare p.irts an<l gears available. 

COLORTRAN LIGHTING EQUIPMENT 

"T.'iO" Watt unit — three spots, one broad, 
stands, converter, cases; equivalent to .'{000 

watts on less than 15 amps. $298.50 

"2000" Watt unit — two light heads and 
stands, converter, case; equivalent to -1000 

watts on less than 20 amps SI80.38 

"5000" Watt unit — two light heads and 
stands, converter, case; equivalent to 10,000 

watts on less than 30 amps. $230.00 

CRIP KQUIPMENT for good lighting con- 
trol, three gobos, five flags, case $122.00 

Immediate delivery on all units. 

GET COLOR RIGHT WITH COLORTRAN LIGHT. 

CAMART CAMERA CAR 

CAMART TV MIKE BOOM • CAMART TRIPOD 

Complete description in the new 1951 

MART MESSAGE 



THE CAMERA • MART inc. 

70 WEST 45lh ST. 

NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 

CABLE ADDRESS-CAMERAMART 

WORLD-WIDE SERVICE 



l()miH h()nA(;HlU)\\E 
PUINTINB WASTEKS 

• 

35mm B&W Negatives 

Enlarged from 16mm Originals 

• 

35mm Color Theatre Prints 

Enlarged From 

16mm Kodachrome Originals 



16mm-35mm Specialized 

LAB SEI'.VICES 

Special Effects 

Dissolves # Montages 

Wipes • Fades • Zooms 

Superimposures 

Frame Sequence Alterolion 



FILMEFFECTS 

OF HOLLYWOOD 

1IS3 N. Highlond Ave . Hollywood 38, Calif. 
Hollywood 9-S800 

FOR TV 

35n,m i?&'%V or Color Dilmi 
r^raucta to 1(>mm 



GE Shows New Recreation Film: 

( C O N T 1 N U K D K K O M I' A G K K I) H T Y • K 1 G 11 T ) 

ervbodv'.s Kusiness." is one of four components 
iif the ('ain[>ui;^ii kit. It i.s desi-iiied lo help coin- 
inuiiit) li-a<lers plan their campaifiiis and lakes 
up (juoslioMS of iir>:aiii/alii>n and in.stitulion of 
the prof-raii). I)udf;<-1 pr<ililrnis. and the ex|«-ri- 
ences of other cilies. 

An interestingly laid out and illuslratetl bro- 
chure is "Industrial He<reation Is Good Busi- 
ness", >vhi(h .slates at the outset thai 2().()(M) 
tompanies are speniliiif; .^ISO.IH !().()( 11) a year lo 
•;ive their 24.(K)0,()(M) eniployi-i-s hi'lter jday fa- 
cilities. The booklet is replete with suggestions 
for plavground activities and the physical as- 
pects of ac<|uirin}i and la\ing out facilities. 

Other Materials i.n the Campaign Kit 

In "The Manual of F"l(>odlinhling Plans" are 
presented 6.'^ ways to facilitate nighl outdoor 
sports, (ieiieral Klectric's lliuininating I,al)ora- 
lory prepared the plans. 

The fourth item is the "Audience Handout," 
a leaflet scorecard for distribution to community 
audiences and providing a 14-question evalua- 
tion of the ( ciininunity's recreational rating. 

LxcK OF Facii.itie.s Cause of Crime 
italistically the fdm and manuals pin their 
case to some illuminating facts. Shortage of 
playgrounds contributed in one year to injuries 
lo .5().()0() children playing in the streets, with 
800 fatalities. While only 2..'i()0 of 16.000 mu- 
nicipalities haye organized recreation services 
I only one-eighth of the recreational workers are 
employed full-time), arrests for crimes increased 
nearly .50 per cent in 10 years and most were 
comniittcd by indiyiduals 21 years old and 
younger. In two years after opening supervised 
playgrounds, delinquency declined 70 per cent 
at Anaheim, Calif. Rejections for military serv- 
ice in World War II totaled three and a half 
million young men. In Chicago Col. Theodore 
P. Bank, president of the Athletic Institute, 
pointed out that the necessary speeding up of 
basic trainees currently does not permit suiii- 
cient time for physical training through sports 
and recreation programs and its up lo the com- 
munities to do something about it. 
Editor's Note: For details concerning the film 
program of The Athletic Institute and other 
available sports films, consult Thk .'^ports Kii.m 
Guide, a Business Scree.n Guide publication 
available from this source. 




Pick the PERFECT POINTER up and "presto" e 
brilliant point appears on the screen . . . No 
fumbling in the dark for a switch (there Isn't any) 
. . . Place the PERFECT POINTER back on the 
table and — off goes its light! It Is; 

• EASY TO HANDLE (weight 8 oi.) 

• FITS ANY BRIEF CASE OR COAT 
POCKET 

• ALWAYS IN FOCUS 

• LOW IN COST 

• ECONOMICAL TO MAINTAIN 

• S20.00 POSTPAID Iquontlty discount) 

THE PERFECT POINTER 

740 TUCKAHOE RD. TUCKAHOE. N. Y. 




FILM STRIP 

CABINET 

• Six drawer all steel cabinet 

• Holds over 336 of the 1 ' }" cans 

• Individual compartments 

• Individually indexed 

• Adjustable dividers for larger 
rolls 

• Olive gray enamel, baked on 

WRITE FOR CATALOG 116 — Com- 
plete line 16mm film filing and 
handling equipment. 



J^EwmoBfl PRODUCTS corp 

330 W i1 ST. NEW YORK 18. NY 



Products fitliuTlisrd in these pnpes repre- 

si'tit the "hliie chilis" of the iiudio-risiial 

industry find merit \tiiir full pntronnp'. 



M 



/a Aaa^ .d£\.CHce 



• Ansco Color type 238 duplicating 

• B &. W and color \sork prints 

• Black and white printing 

• Rushes — 3 hour service 

• Sound track processing 

• Negative processing 

• Reversal processing 

• Dupe negatives 



► 



FISCHER PHOTOGBAPHIC LABORATORIES 
1729 N MOBILE AVENUE CHICAGO 39 



SOUND RECORDING 

at a reasonable cost 

High fidelity 16 or 35. Quality 

guaranteed. Complete studio and 

laboratory services. Color printing 

and lacquer coating. 

ESCAR 

MOTION PICTORE SERVICE, 

7315 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland 3, Ohio 



50 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE,* 



A NATIONAL DIRECTORY OF VISUAL EDUCATION DEALERS 



EASTERN STATES 



• CONNECTICIT • 



Rockwell Film & Projection 
Service. 182 High St.. Hartford .i. 

Elastern Film Libraries, 148 Grand 
Street, ^'aterbury 5. 



• DISTRICT OF COLUMBI.4 • 



Jam Handy Organization. Inc.. 

Transportation Bldg.,\^'ashing- 
ton 6. 

The Film Center, 915 12th St. 
N.W .. Washinprton. 

The Walcott-Tavlor Company, 
Inc.. 501 Mills' BIdg., Washing- 
ton, 6, D. C. 



• MAR"iX.4ND • 



, Robert L. Davis, V. 0. Box 572, 
Cumberland. 

Howard E. Thompson, Box 204, 
Mt. Airv. 



• MASSACHUSETTS 



Bailev Film Service, 59 Chandler 
Street, Tfl. 4-0214, \Xorcester 8. 



• NEW HAMPSHIRE • 



A. H. Rice Co., Inc., 78 West Cen- 
tral Street, Manchester. 



• NEW JERSEY • 



SlidtH-raft ("o., 142 Morris Ave., 
Miiuiitnin IjikfTi. N. J. 



• NE\t YORK • 

Aaaociation Films, Inc., 33 West 
45th Slr.-,t, Now \oTk 19. 

Buchan Pictures, 79 Allen St., 
Buffalo. 

Charles J. Giegerich, 42-20 Kis- 
sena Blvd., Flushing. 

Comprehensive Service Co., 245 

W. .'vith St.. Now York 19. 

Cravtford & Immig. Inc., 265 W. 
14lh St., New York City 11. 



The Jam Handy Organization. 
Inc., 1775 Broadway, New York. 

Ken Killian Sd. & Vis. Pdts. 

P. 0. Box 361 Hempstead. N. Y. 

Mogull. Film and Camera Com- 
panv. 1121 14 W. 48th St.. .New 
York 19. 

Paromel Co., 40-18 Astoria Blvd.. 
"^iiulh. l.onf; Island City 3. 

Jack Patent. 13 East 37th Street, 
.New York 16. 

S. O. S. Cinema Supply Corp., 
602 W. 52nd St., New York 19. 

Specialized Sound Products Co., 

.i.il Fifth Axe.. New York 17. 

United Specialists, Inc., Pawling. 
Visual Sciences, .599BS Suffern. 



• PENNSYLVANIA • 

Jam llandv Organisation, Inc., 

93(1 I'enii Ave.. I'illsl>urgh 22. 

J. P. Lilley & Son, 277 Boas St.. 
Harrisburg. 

Lippincott Pictures, Inc., 4729 
Ludlow St., Philadelphia 39. 



• RHODE ISLAND • 

Weslcoll, Slade & Balcom Co., 

95-99 Empire St., Providence 3. 



• \^ EST VIRGINIA • 

J. (,. Haley, P. O. Box 703, 
Charleston 2'-^. 

Pavis, Inc., 427 W. Washington St., 
Phone 2,5311, Box 6095, Station 
A, Charleston 2. 

United Specialties, 81(i W . \ir- 
ginia St., Charleston 2. 

Theatre Service & Supplv Co., 

Phone 240ki, Box 138'). Hunting- 
ton. 



SOUTHERN STATES 



• AL.\BAMV • 

Stevens Picluren, Inc., 'tiH, F.ipht- 
ecnth St., North, Birmingham. 

• FLOKIDA • 

.Norman Ijiboratf>ries & Studio. 

Arlington Suburb, Jacksonville. 



Southern Photo and News, 608 

E. LaFayelte St., Tampa. 

• GEORGIA • 

Colonial Films, 1118 W. Pcachlree 
St.. N.W .. A Twood 7.588. Atlanta. 

.*«tevens Pictures. Inc., 101 \X'alton 
St., N. W ., Atlanta 3. 

• LOUISIANA • 

.Stanley Projection Company, 

21 P J Murray St.. .Alexandria. 

Stevens Pictures, Inc., 1307 Tu- 
lane Ave., New Orleans. 

Stirling Visual Education Co., 

1052 Florida St., Baton Rouge. 

Delta ^'isuaI Service. Inc., 815 

Povdras St.. New Orleans 13. 

HarFilms, Inc., 600 Baronne St., 
New Orleans. Since 1915. 



• MISSISSIPPI • 

Herschel Smith Companv, 119 

Roach St., Jackson 110. 

Jasper Ewing & Sons, 227 S. State 

St.. Jackson 2. 



• TENNESSEE • 

Southern Visual Films, 687 

Shrine BIdg.. .Memphis. 

Tennessee ^ isual Education 
Service, 4l6 .\. Broad St., .Nash- 
ville. 

• VIRGINIA • 

Capitol Film & Radio Co., Inc., 
19 W. Main St., Richmond 20. 

National Film Service, 202 E. 

Cary ."^t.. Richmond. 

Tidewater Audio-\ isual Center, 

617 W. 35th St.. Norfolk 8. Phone 
51371. 



• ARK.\NS.\S • 

DfiiiiM-rat Printing anil Litho- 
graphing <!<)., Little Rock. 

Grimm-W illiams Co., 113 W. 
Sixth SUeet, Little Rock. 



MIDWESTERN STATES 



• ILLINOIS • 

.\nieriraii Film Kcginlry, 24 E. 

Kighth ."street. Chicago 5. 

Vss<M-inli<in Films, Inc., 79 F^al 
AdanLo St.. Chicago 3. 



Jam Handy Organization. Inc.. 

230 N. Mirhi<.'an Ave., Chicago 1. 

Midwest Visual Equipment Co., 

6961 N. Clark St., Chicago 26. 

Swank Motion Pictures. 614 N. 

Skinker Blvd., St. Louis 5, Mo. 



• INDIANA • 



Burke's Motion Picture Co.. 434 

Lincoln Wav West, South Bend 5. 



• low A • 

Pratt Sound Films. Inc., 720 3rd 

Ave.. S.F.. Cedar Rapids. Iowa. 

Ryan Visual Aids Service. lOO-ll 
Harrison St.. Davenport. 

• KANSAS-MISSOl RI • 



Kansas City Sound Service, 1402 
Locust St.. Kansas City 6. Mo. 

Erker Bros. Optical Co.. 610 

Olive St.. St. Louis 1. 

Swank Motion Pictures. 014 .N. 

Skinker Blvd.. St. Louis 5. 



• MICHIGW • 



Engleman N'isual Education 
Service. 4754-56 Woodward Ave., 

Detroit 1. 

Jam Handv Organization. Inc.. 

2821 E. Grand Blvd.. Detroit 11. 

Capital Film Service. 224 .\bbott 
Road, Fast I.ansing, Michigan. 



• MINNKSOTA • 



National Chimera Exchange. 86 S. 

Sixth St.. .New Farmers Mrrhanics 
Bank BIdg., Minneapolis 2. 



OHIO 



Ralph N. Haile & Associates, 

2\'f \\ .limit St.. Cincinnsti. 

Arailemy Film Service Inc.. 23U» 
Payne Ave., Gevrland 14. 

Carpenter Visual .^rviee. Inc., 

1.3002 Kuclid Ave. Fast (Icveland 
12, Ohio. 

(CONTIM'ED ON NEXT PACE) 



USE THIS DIRECTORY TO LOCATE THE BEST IN EQUIPMENT, FILMS AND PROJECTION SERVICE 



NUMBER 3 • NOLUME 12 • 19S1 



SI 



LOCAL AUDIO-VISUAL SUPPLIERS 



iCOMIMKI) IKOM THK rKKCKDIN*. DIKKCTOK^ l'\(.K) j 



The Colburn Story: 



Fryan Film Service, S228 Euclid 
Ave., Cleveland 15. 

Sanray Filnii*, Inc.. 2108 Payne 
Ave.. Clpvcl;in<l II. 

Jam lluiiiiv Organization, Inc., 

310 Talluill Building. Dayton 2. 

Toyman Films Inc., 400 West 

First Strrrt. Davton. 

M. H. Martin Company, 50 

Charles Ave.. S. E. Massillon. 



• WISco^sL^ • 

R. H. Flath Company, 2410 N. 3d 
St.. Milwaukee 12. 



WESTERN STATES 



• C4UFORNIA • 

Donald J. Clausonthue, 1829 N. 
Craig .\ve.. .Altadena. 

Coast Visual Education Co., 5620 
Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28. 

Hollywood Camera Exchange, 

1600 N. Cahuenga Blvd., Holly- 
wood 28. 

Jam Handy Organization, Inc., 

7046 HoUywood Blvd., Los An- 
geles 28. 

Raike Company, 829 S. Flower St., 
Los .Angeles 17. 

Spindler & Sauppe, 2201 Beverly 
Blvd., Los Angeles 4. 

Association Films, Inc., 351 Turk 

St., San Francisco 2. 

C. R. Skinner Manufacturing 
Co., 292-294 Turk St., San Fran- 
cisco 2. 



• COLORADO • 

Home .Movie Sales .\gency, 28 E. 
Ninth Ave., Denver 3. 



• OKLAHOMA • 

Vaseco, 2301 Classen, Oklahoma, 
City 6. 

H. O. Davis, 522 N. Broadway, 
Oklahoma City 2. 

Kirkpatrick, Inc., 1634 S. Boston 
Ave.. Tulsa 5. 



• OREGON • 

Moore's .Motion Picture Service, 
306 S. W. Ninth Ave., Portland 5. 



• TEXAS • 

.'Vssoriation Films, Inc., 1915 Live 

Oak St.. Dallas 1. 

Audio Video, Inc., 4000 Ross Ave., 
Dallas 4; 1702 Austin Ave., 
Houston. 

George H. Mitchell Co., 712 N. 

Haskell, Dallas 1. 

Capitol Photo Supplies, 2428 
Guadalupe St., Phone 8-5717, 
Austin. 



• UTAH • 

Deseret Book Company, 44 E. So. 

Temple St., Salt Lake City 10. 



CANADA 



Audio-Visual Supply Company, 

Toronto General Trusts Building, 
\X innipeg, Man. 



FOREIGN 



Distribuidora Filmica Venezo- 
lana De 16MM., S.A., Apartado 
706 Caracas, Venezuela, S.A. 



Qualified Dealers Invited 
to Appear in This Listing 

♦ If you are a specializing audio- 
visual dealer or distributor, you are 
invited to apply for listings in the 
National Directory pages of Busi- 
ness Screen. A nominal service 
charge is made for each acceptable 
listing. 

Application form sent on request. 
Listings in these pages are subject 
to cancellation if products or serv- 
ices are below the minimum stand- 
ard set by the Editors and reported 
by users in this field. Wc invite 
reader participation and patronage. 



A BUSINESS SCREEN READER SERVICE 



(CONTINIIEII KHOM I' A G K 49 ( 

ing management paid the cxpi-n-' - 
of transferring the rdiiipaiiy to an- 
other lloor and laying out the lab- 
oratiiry to Colburn speiifiratiims. 

.■\t that time the concern was per- 
forniing 70 different kinds of oper- 
ations, chiefly printing, reversals, 
tinting and toning ('^1 to 95 \kt 
cent of llu- laboratory's business 
today is with color film I. enlarge- 
ments, reductions, editing, title- 
making, recordings, and a little 
photographv on outside work on a 
time and material basis. But the 
company stayed away from produc- 
ing. Five years ago they left the 
Mart when the lease ran out and 
they needed additional operating 
room. 

On the fourth lloipi at the Wacker 
address the Colburn corporation 
concentrates upon 35mm opera- 
tions, copying slidefilms and mak- 
ing quantity slides from larger 
material ( a masking service is pro- 
vided for better control of prints). 
Here also are the shop for construc- 
tion of printing equipment and 
other devices, also the offices and 
reviewing rooms. On the third 
floor, besides the main offices, are 
located record studios, art and ani- 
mation and editing rooms. The sec- 
ond floor houses the order writing 
and bookkeeping departments, 
printing and inspection rooms. The 
lower level floor has the shipping 
and storage facilities, chemical 
mixer, reversal machine, black and 
white positive and negative machine 
and experimental developing facil- 
ities. Projection rooms have been 
set up adjacent to mechanical de- 
partments throughout to speed serv- 
ice. Approximately one-fourth of 
the overall operating space is for 
color printing. 

Magnetic Recokding Chan.nel 
The most recent addition is a 
quarter-inch magnetic tape record- 
ing channel for a small company 
doing its own sound recording, a 
magnetic recorder with soundhead. 
The tapes are transferred to film 
and the companies take them back 
and edit them. A new developing 
machine was constructed two years 
ago for speedup. Last year a De- 
\ rv proje<tor was built up by Col- 
burn to run pii'ture and .sound 
track simultaneously. The sound 
track can be advanced or retarded 
over a space of nine frames to 
check synchronization. Eight of 
these machines have been con- 
structed, two for the laboratory, the 
others for various producers. The 
conibinalion was devis<-d for the 
Colhurns' own use. but when pro- 
ducers saw it thev wanted it too. 




Tinker Toys, a Mechano set, a 

Grandfather's gas stereopticon — 

George W. Colburn at 16, with his 

homemade projector. 

There was nothing else of the kind 
in the 16mm field. 

The editing machine which was 
the subject of the SMPTE paper 
was devised for measuring ' i" syn- 
chronous magnetic tape in terms of 
16mm film in feel and frames for 
service purposes. The diameter of 
the driving drum is changed with 
a series of slip-on rings. 

Television Demands Speed 
The heavy influx of orders for 
television one- minute spot films 
posed a problem. Orders averaged 
2 to 6 prints. Net as many persons 
in the laboratory were involved as 
for handling 8(Ht feet of Koda- 
chrome. Service was placed on a 
weekly basis: spots are assembled 
on Tuesday, the duplicate negative 
is made Vl'ednesday, the transfer 
of sound from magnetic tape fol- 
lows and the answer print is ready 
Thursday, additional prints on Fri- 
dav. The work is channeled through 
one man in the editing department. 
The laboratory has stuck to a meth- 
od of operation w hereunder the 
original show is in either 16nun 
color or reversal from which a 
duplicate negative is made to gel 
the best results. 

Requests for special work, how- 
ever, are received from every di- 
rection on the globe. We saw 
postmarks on envelo[)es from Rot- 
terdam. Holland: Caracas. \'ene- 
zuela: Trinidad; Singapore: the 
Danish Vi est Indies; Stavanger, 
Norwav; K<d»e. Japan: Bombay. 
India: Hamburg. Germany; from 
Trinidad. San Salvador. Hong 
Kong. Paris: from Spain. New Zea- 
land. Mexiio. Knglanil. Ecuador. 

Oh yes. word of the C(dliurn 
laboratory has gotten around. W 



ONLY BYRON 
CAN MAKE 
COLOR-CORRECT* 
PRINTS 



color-correct 
color-correct 
color-correct 
color-correct 
color-correct 
color-correct 
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colQff-correct 
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c&ior-correct 

cohitzcotr^t 
color-correct 

color-correct ?.X5?" 

color-correct 

color-correct 

color-correct 

color-correct 

color-correct 



our exclusive process 

introduced in 1945 

is recognized as the 

highest standard in the industry 



\ 



* TRADE-MARK EXCLUSIVE WITH 



Studios and laboratory 

1226 Wisconsin avenue, n. w. 
Washington 7, d. c. 
dupont 1800 



24 hour service on aniwer prints 



When pipe dreams come true, it's a story worth 
telling. The Oklahoma Natural Gas Company tells 
the stor>' of its early-day dreams come true for 
public service — and how they continue to develop — 
in a Kodachrome motion picture, "Pipe Dreams Come 
True," produced by 




PflESEN" ATIONS . EDOCATICNAL MOTION PICTURES • SLIDEFILMS • TRAINING ASSISTAl 



: aTON, D.c e 

'REET N.W 



PITTSSUBGH 22 
93l AVE 



DETBorr 11 

JH5 , F ORANn SrVT) 



DAYTON 2 
iin TAmriTT ninn 



CHICAGO I 
?^n Ki/^BTu tsif-%nn.A%i matt 



JX ANCf Lt> I"! 



BUSINESS SCREEN 



If AGAZIiXC: 




M.MIIKIl FOUH OF VOIJ >IE TWELVE • lA.'SI • KI!VGLE I'OPY FIFTY I1EXTS 
x%Tiiftx%i Jifei iixv%i nv %l'nin.VIKI AT i IIM M it:\ii' ATIO^S 




5. 



(AcnxfSacCcf!^ fKuxttcftCf. ta ^otj^acat 



. . . for their latest engineering 
development in home appliances — a 
clothes dryer with "rainbow-drying" 
action — introduced to dealers and 
consumers in a sound motion picture 
in color entitled 



a 




IRACLE OF THE RAINBOW" 



And Hotpoint's pointing to ATLAS 
as producer of this fine introductory 
vehicle. 



Conveniently located at the '"crossroads 
of America," ATLAS is completely 
equipped to produce motion pictures, 
sound slidefilms, training and recruiting 
programs and TV commercials. 

Your inquiry is invited. 



.y^f^ 



ESTABLISHED 1913 

nil SOUTH BOULEVARD OAK PARK, ILLINOIS 

CHICAGO TELEPHONE: AUSTIN 7-8620 



SOUND 




fii(:o9.DmG 




JDl 1 



PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG MAN 

WHO IS GOING PLACES 

IN TELEVISION 




He has a pronounced flair for promoling 
sales by means of Motion Pictures and 
Television. 

He measures all scripts by the extent to 
which they lend themselves to VISUAL 
Dramatic Action. 

He knows what it lakes in skill and time 
and money - to produce a first-rate pro- 
motional film for showings to selected 
groups . . . and he stoutly maintains that 
the same standards should prevail in con- 
tracting for films designed to sell goods 
or services by TELEVISION. 

He is keenly aware that Television — in the 
client's eyes has now become the touch- 



stone for assaying "quality of service"... 
and that if he fails to recommend and 
justify the proper budget, IF he fails to 
allow enough lime for creating top-flight 
commercials (let alone the supporting 
programs!), IF he permits an inept hand 
to do the guiding and does not voice 
AN effective protest, certain major ac- 
counts that run into the millions of dol- 
lars can go flying out the window. 

He sets results above every other con- 
sideration which is why this man and 
a number of others in like position are 
placing more and more of their television 
work with Caravel. 



The technique of making films for television isn't something you learn from a 
book ... or from shooting a lot of newsreel footage. Caravel learned the hard way 
- by making hundreds of successful films to promote sales. Ask us to show you 
some of the recent commercials we have made. Either at your offices or ours. 



CARAVEL FILMS 

incorporated 



730 FIFTH AVENUE. ..NEW 



YORK. 



TEL 



CIRCLE 



6 110 



r- 



P--- V'^tisn. biuU there, 

.«: a substitute, 
act as a ="■' 



AJ 




jld foUo'W 



but they 



--r:s«-^--^t*ec«e 



jroducer can 



, back to us, 



^estinghouse over 



Producers of <" _ ^ ^^,0^, » .■ 






dicMiS Jf 



ted ,epe^l(' 



My 



:roT"o»-' 






«i.tjr«"o'''« ""^^ '"" 




^"^"^ »r\v Drive 



Beve 



rW «■'»'*■ 



RimNRSfi srBKi.\ M4r;A7iNE 



— y 




Soiiietliiies even 
tlie$$e woirt do ... 

Many machine operations in a modern industrial plant are so 
rapid even the eye can't follow. Time and motion studies by usual 
methods often fall short of the needed exactness. 

Because accurate analyses can mean the difference between 
profit and loss, many plant engineers now depend on movies taken 
with Bell & Howell precision equipment. 

The experience of the Ramsey Corporation is only one of 
many. The extraordinary precision with which Bell & Howell 
cameras, projectors and accessories are built make them ideal for 
all industrial needs. 

Basic for industrial use... 

The IGinm 7()-TM, .slmwii hfiu, is built both 
for heavy-duty and precision work. 7 accu- 
rate film .speeds especially for time study - 
500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000 and 4000 
frames per minute. Accurate spring drive. 
Adapted to take electric motor. The wide 
variety of accessories for this camera make 
it ideal for any industrial purpose. Special 
projectors for time study use al.so available. 

You buy for life when you buy . 




Bell L Howell 



How Ramsey Corporation solved 
vexing time study problem . . . 




Ramsey Corporation of St. Louis, makers of auto- 
motive piston rings and expanders, needed depend- 
able analyses of certain machine operations as a 
basis for piece rates. Usual observational methods 
produced unsatisfactory results. 




With the cooperation of Bell & Howell ennmeers. 
time studies were then made on film using Bell & 
Howell equipment. The result was the establishment 
of piece rates satisfactory to all concerned. The 
vi.sual analyses also led to a number of improve- 
ments in operational melhod.s. Shown is Wilham A. 
Voglcr of Ramsey Corporation exhibiting time study 
film to group of employees. 



BOOKLET SHOWS HOW MOVIES A 
IN TIME-MOTION STUDIES 

ft«ll & Howall Company 

710a McCormicli Hood. Chicago 4S. Ill 

Gfiuli-mrn 

Please send mc your free IxKiklet 

"Mfiisure Time Accurately." 



C.l, 




N I M II K R t • \ O I I M K I : • I .-, I 




THE AMERICAN COWBOY' 

Selected at the 

recent first annual 

Boston Film Festival 

cus the outstandins; 

film in its class . . . 

fourth in the, 
public relations series 
of color motion pictures 
entitled 

"Americans at Home" 

FOR THE 

FORD MOTOR COMPANY 

produced by 



MPO 

PRODUCTIONS, INC 

15 EAST 53rd STREET 

NEW YORK 22 
MURRAY HILL 8-7830 




TIIE/OFF.SCREEIV 

Selling, Training Are Fundamental 
to Sound U. S. Economic Program 

DK; IWKNTOKIKS ..f applia.i..^. home 
*-* fiiiiiisliiii'is. ami many olhcr key items 
wliicli l)\ this time uiTc (i^ureil to Ix' in short 
supply indicate the potent force of U. S. indus- 
trial production. Notwithstanding the red tape 
and the actual lack of some key raw materials, 
industrv has deli\ere(l the goods in ahundaiice 

too much aliundance for the size of the con- 
sumers tax-shrunk purse, it seems. 

It seems [M^ssihle that the growing size of 
the defense production effort can he taken in 
stride by industry — at least in this period of 
preparedness rather than extended hostilities. 
If that should he, the real weight of this next 
period will fall heavily upon the key man in 
our economic system — the salesman. Ahused 
and neglected through the past war years, pre- 
pared for similar treatment in this era. good 
old Joe is due to come out of the cellar. 

He'll have some good questions to ask the 
boys in the engineering department and a few 
more for the Washington brains who are sup- 
posed to help keep this country sound. But he 
asks no special privileges and no "breaks" other 
than the goods to sell and the prospects out in 
the field. It's up to management to keep him 
going, to get him the facts and to present thejti 
clearly on all points concerning the "line". Just 
as it's up to management to maintain his de- 
served stature, high up near the top of the com- 
pany's organization chart and kept there. 

Sales training via films and other forms of 
audio and visual communications has long since 
proven its effectiveness in doing a helpful job 
all along the selling line among wholesalers, 
jobbers, distributors, and certainly among the 
retailer's personnel. 



OHice of the Publisher 

l.iO Kast Sli'kkiok St.. Chicaco 11. li.i.. 

0. H. Coelln. Jr.. Editxir & Publisher 

E. A. Rovelstad. Editorial 

Steven Vlasich. Prodiietion 

Eastern Editurial Bureau 

Robert Se\inour. Jr.. Eastern Manager 

4«9 Fifth Avenue. New York City 

Riverside 9-021. t or MUrrav Hill 2-2492 

Western Kilitorial Bureau 

Kdmund Kerr, if eslern Manager 

660.') Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood 28. Cal. 

Telephone: HEmpstead 3171 

BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 

Issue 4 • Volume 12 • 1951 

N*ur F "ur. V olutnr Twelve ot Hiisinrss Screen MaK-i'i»^ 
piihli%heil June 25, 1951. !h»uc(1 S timcn annually at Mx-weck 
interval-t at 1 5(» Kast Superior Street. ChicaKo 11. Mlinni't hy 
ItvI^ine■^* Srrecn MaRazines. Inc. F'hone \v Ililehall 4 (iX07. 
O, H, CoeHn, Jr.. Editor and Publisher. In New York Ciiy: 
Robert Seymour. Jr.. 4M'' Kitth Avenue. Telrphi>ne Klvef^iilr 
'UJIS or MTrray Hill 2 2V>1. In Los Angeles: Edmund 
Kerr. f.605 HoUywcxwI Mlvd. Telephone H Kmp-ite-i.l .U7I. 
Subiirriptiun $.1.00 & year; $5.00 two year* ( drime^tic t ; $4.00 
and $7.00 forriipn. Kntered ai* !»econd clasn matter May 2. 
\**At\, at the P4w»t office at Chifaiio. Illinois, uniler Act of 
March .1. 18"'>. Kntire cmitenis Copynnht 1951 by HujiineM 
Screen Maifazinn, Inc. Trailrmark registered V. S. Patent 
Office. Address advertisinx and subscription inquiries to the 
Chicagr) office of publication. 



A dull screen 

rob> pictures 

of detoil 




A Do-Lite jcrecn 

makei pictures 

bright and clear 



De Luxe 
Chollenger^ 




^^ 



You Improve 

MIL Wl^S 

• BRILLIANCE 
• DETAIL 

• CONTRAST 



when you change to 



DA-LITE 



K) 



CRYSTAL-BEADED SCREENS 

11 your screens are streaked, yellow with 
age, or do not hang smooth, your pic- 
tures will be dull, blurred and distorted, 
lo insure perfect theatre-quality projec- 
tion, change to DaLite Crystal-Beaded 
Screens.' 

They can make every scene 200 to 500% 
brighter, clearer and richer in detail. 
They are made by the same company 
that has been making screens for the 
finest theatres since 1909. Compare! You 
will choose DA-LITE for better pictures 
and Ionizer, more dependable service. 

Why Da-Life Screens Are Better 

A. Thr«e opoqw* cooimpt 

B. SlfO«g non-crockirvg. non. 
lOQQing fobrk 

C. Highe^i quoltty fyroxylm 
focing 

0. Cooling tw»«i b«odl 10 

PyfOB ylin 
E. Dolitc Cryirot Btodt (or 
moximwRi brtghtn*!! 

Your Dealer Has Do-Llte Screens 
for Every Need 

Write (or FREE 

tampls of Do til* Cryirol S*od*d 
icr*«n fobric and 6-pag* brochure 

■plonning for EfT»cMv» Pfojodion" 
whichoniwort mony 

qu«iliont on pro- 

jcclton. 





DA-LITE SCREEN COMPANY, Inc. 

3703 N. Pulaski Rood, Chicago 39, IMInolt 

l'l«-«*f tend FKF.K *«n)plr of Da- Lite Cryaul- Beaded •crf«o 
fabric mod 6-pi(e brorhure "PUoning lor Elleeiive ProjettioD." 

^^■*"* 

Firm ^■"*- 

AddreM — ^^^.^^^^^_^^^^^^_^__»_^_^_^^^^^^^^^^__ 

City Zone Slate 



HI SINK: 



SCHKFN M *<; «/INRl 




We of Wilding salute the great City of Detroit 



on its 250th Anniversary and gratefully acknowledge its 



important contributions to the development of the 



commercial film industry. 



It has been our privilege to serve many of Detroit's 



leading companies for whom we have produced 176 sound 



motion pictures, hundreds of slidefilms. and other related 



training materials. 



P CHICAGO = 

1345 Argylc Street 







I 



NEW YORK 

385 Madison Ave. 



DETROIT-^ 

4925 Cadieux Rd. 



CLEVELAND 

310Swctland Bldg. 

HOLLYWOOD 

I 5981 Venice Blvd. 

\ 

ST. LOUIS 

4053 Lindell Blvd. 



CINCINNATI 

Enquirer Bldg. 
'Scudio Facilities 



WILDING 

PICTURE PRODUCTIONS, INC 



m 



'^xir^xi OTr-riTDCC . ci imi i.ii \i«^ . rri i \ i < i r ^ xi u i i \ « »w 





Ul^ 




Color is not only our business at Houston 
Color Film Laboratories, but an exacting 
science and a fine art. The very finest, modern 
equipment is used to assure absolute control 
during every stage of developing and printing, 
thereby reproducing true "living" colors. 
Houston technicians are color experts with a 
wealth of experience and know-how that 
is unmatched in all the world. Try Houston 
on your next job and see the difference. 

• Developing and Printing 35MM color film 

• Duplicating prints on 35MM color film 

• Processing 16MM color film 

• 35MM color film strips and slide films 



HOUSTON 



Color Film Laboratories, Inc. 
230 W. Olive St., Burbank. Calif. • CH. 0-8188 

Fast, Immediate Service • Processing Color Film Exclusively 

World's largest processors of 35MM Ansco Color Film 



Ford Film a Tribute to 
"PritJe of Workmanship" 

* Dick Kill- c.f l'(ori;i. nil 
mils i.H u ty|>i<'ul AiiiiTicai 
l>i>\, but a little liit >^|>r( iai 
Like many boys, he likfs t<, 
work with his hands, take: 
pride in making tools am 
muscles obey an idea in hi: 
mind. IJut Dick Kic e is >\te 
cial ill llial lie has met thi 
ihallenge of compelitioi 
and has the satisfaction o: 
knowing his work is justi 
about the be.st among all thr 
boys in the country. 

Dick Rice's story is told 
in a new Ford Motor Com- 
panv picture. Pride oj 
Workmanship. 20 inin.. col- 
or, produced b) Ml*() Pro- 
ductions. Beginning one; 
morning when a telegram 
arrives telling him he ha 
won the woodworking prize 
in Ford's Industrial Arts 
Contest, the film Hashes 
back to show how D i c kv 
those his shop woodworking 
project, a handsome break- 
front, got the work moving 
and finished up with a piece 
any cabinet maker would . 
be proud of. 

Judging the entries att 
Chicago's Museum of Sci-I 
ence and Industry, scenes of I 
shop projects in several cit- 1 
ies and in many other cate- ; 
gories besides woodworking 
and a trip with the .Awards 
winners through the Hiver 
Rouge plant round out the 
film to give a good overall 
picture of what the Ford In- 
dustrial .Arts .Awards are 
striving to accomplish. 

Pride oj ff'orknianship 
has already stirred up even 
more interest in this year's 
award, now being held on a 
regional basis to accommo- 
date a larger entry list, and 
has brought favorable com- 
ments to Ford from many 
city and county schools s\s- 
tciiis using the (iliii. ^ 

Names West Coast Outlet 

♦ Aiilniiialic I'rnj.-, lor Cor- 
poration has a|>p<iiMtcd the 
Radio Recorder hl<]uipment 
Company. 7000 .^anta Mon- 
ica Boulevard. Los Angeles 
38. as western distributor. 



NOW THERE'S A COMPLETE EARM FILM GUIDE FOR REFERENCE USE 



■¥ Nearly 1,100 available free and low-cost motion 
pictures and slidenims and their .sources are listed 
in the new F'arm Film Guide recently added to 
the I iliii (;uidi- Library of Business Screen. Sent 



postjiaid at onlv .oOf per copy (on recei|)l of 
stamps, coin, money order, or <'ompariv check I . 
Order your copy toda\ from Business Screen, I. id K. 
Superior. Chicago II. Dist-ount on quantitv orders. 



PRESENTATIONS. TREATMENTS. 
COMPLETE SHOOTING SCRIPTS 

GERALD BLANK 

194-60B 64th Ave. 

Fresh Meadows, L. I.. N. Y. 

JA 6-4220 TE B-Tl?* 



BUSINESS .SCREEN MAIiAZINE 



II 



RCA's new 400 Jttutor 



iaVAJjJU-eUV\\Jb (CompI 



ete Single-Case Portable) 



16mm Sound Movie Proiector 



The new "400" Junior has all the features 
you have looked for in a I6mm sound 
projector. It is compact and portable. 
Speaker in lift-off cover, projector, and 
connecting cables are all contained in an 
attractive lightweight, single-case unit. 
Easy and quick to set up. So simple to 



thread, even a child can do it. Pictures at 
their best in brilliance and contrast. 
Sound reproduced with dramatic realism 
and full tonal range. Meets every require- 
ment of fully professional quality. Priced 
within limited budget requirements of 
schools, churches, business and industry. 




Convenient to handle 
r,iMl\ i.irncTil. 



So light in weight 
• schoolKirl can pick il 
up to pUcc nn a tahlr. 



II nil Di/if. Kit t"r campUtc iujormation. 



RADIO CORRORATIOM of AMERICA 

h C»»«tei «C* VKIOt C««>p>-v I— •^ "...■.il 



NUMBF.K I • VOLUME 12 • 1 ■» '> 1 




For your 16 mm. scientific 

film requirements 

use Precision . . . 

• Over a decade of 1 6 mm. in- 
dustrial film printint; in black 
and white and color. 

• Fine ijrain dcvelopins,' of all 
negatives and prints. 

• Scientific control in sound 
track processing. 

• 1 00'~r optically printed tracks. 

• Expert timing for exposure 
correction in black & white or 
color. 

• Step printing for highest pic- 
ture quality. 

• Special production effects. 

• Exclusively designij Maurer 
equipment. 

• Personal service. 




iiliil 

liiii'r 



PRECISION 

FILM LABORATORIES, INC. 

21 West 46th St., 

New York 19, N.Y. 

JU 2-3970 




Schwerin Research Secures Theatre 
for Testing RacJio, TV and Pictures 

■k l.a.st inoiith the llrsi panel ..f some 300 .Niu 
^ork folk wen- "ticketed" into the .Sclnv.Tin 
Hf.<i'arcli Corporation's new Test Theatre. For- 
nierl\ a moticm picture house, the Avon at 1187 
Aveiiiii' of ih,. Americas has just been renovatp<l 
for its iiiii(|ue new function. 

Altliougli some seats have been removed to 
make wa\ for lest equipment, a maximum of 
435 [leople can be accommodated. To add real- 
ism in llic testing of television programs, an 
enormous mock-up of a TV set with a 4 by 6 
foot screen is being installed. Lighting has been 
altered so that respondents on test panels can 
read the nundiered boxes on their reaction 
sheets and check them nIT uliil,- a (ilni or TV 
show is in progress. At the same time, glare 
from the lights will not wash out images on 
the screen. 

Special projecting equipment for kines. films, 
and slides is also being installed along with 
recording apparatus to preserve comments ver- 
batim during test sessions. 

The Schwerin group's long-term lease on the 
Avon, at a cost of $150,000. marks the first 
attempt to use a theatre exclusively for testing. 
Since 1946, when Horace Schwerin first opened 
shop, testing has been done on an irregular 
schedule at Carnegie Hall, in NBC Studios, and 
in the movie theatre of the Museum of Modern 
Art. In those last five years, over 500,000 [ipople 
have provided the raw material for detailed 
analysis of business films, documentary movies, 
TV and radio programs. Over 40 clients have 
been served, including AT&T. Campbell Soup, 
Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, Miles Laboratories. Gen- 
eral Mill.s. Lever Brothers. A<lmiral Corp.. NBC, 
and many others. 

At first the Test Theatre will be used only 
three or four times a week for testing: this 



Horace Schwerin. president of Schwerin Re- 
search Corp., anil Lm Kudisch. executive vice- 
president, insjiect jacilities oj \pm York's Avon 
Theatre which is In become a te.st center for 

jilnis. railio and Iclcrisinri. 





Ann IhikI). content analyst oj Schiienn He 
search Corp.. watches a te.st oj the projection 
screen at the Avon. .Slide is one used to intro- 
duce panels to the job of judging programs. 



tempo will be speeded up later. Most of the 
tests will be in the evening, with some afternoon 
sessions, and occasional Saturday morning se»- 
!<ions for children. 



Coleman Firm Uses Dimensional 
Viewers in Visual Sales Training 

"k Three-dimensional stereopticon viewers are 
going to bat for one company whose manage- 
ment believes with the alert boss of any big 
league baseball team that when you're a run in 
the lead is the time to drive home a few more 
baserunners for insurance against the later 
innings. 

Operating a sales training school for dealers 
in a period when merchandise is becoming short 
doesn't appeal to a shortsighted manager of a 
business, but the one with the memory of what 
happened to many a sales force in World War II 
when the |)lant Has ])lunged into defense produc- 
tion is not going to let go of the long-range 
viewpoint. 

Sheldon Coleman, general manager • of the 
Coleman Co. of W ichita. Kan., of which \^ . C. 
Coleman is president, knows the history of busi- 
ness cycles and against the day to come when 
"hard" selling returns he has in work a five-year 
training school program which represents a 
§2.000.000 investment by the manufacturer of 
gas and oil home-heating equipment. 

Hand-held stereopticon viewers are used regu- 
larly iti the intrrisive five-day training period, 
for each of 8.000 key retailers to be instructed 
in the overall program. A class of 40 at a time 

l(i>NT!NIKI> (IN PAGE FORTY-.MNE) 



co.mim; to iioi.i,^ wtKtDy 

WE ARE .SEEKING a writer for 
sdiiiid .slide film.s who has a .solid 
back.mound of .sellinjr and .sales train- 
ing. .Al.so we need a production man. 
diiector and photographer for slide 
tilin work. If you are coniin}; West, 
iiiid want permanent employment, 
write full particulars. .All informa- 
tion will l)e held strictly confidential. 

I '.ox 6A 

1:L SINE.SS .SCREEN MAGAZINE 

l.')0 E. Superior St. • Chicago 11, 111. 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



* i^'g^ ^ 




jilis is 



LIFE 



What would life be without sizzling bacon tor brcaktast, 
tasty cold cuts for lunch ... or a mouth-watering steak, 
roast or chops for dinner.' The great importance of meat 
to our diets and to our economy is pointed up in a new 
color film. This is Life." produced for the American Meat 
Institute. Those who sec it come away with a new realiza- 
tion that "leai it Hie. 



I STUDIOS • HOLLYWOOD 00 



Nl W YORK 



DITtOIT 



CHICAGO 




SHOWS PRACTICAL ATOMIC BOMB DEFENSE 
FOR PLANTS AND PERSONNEL 

— How fo protect your people and your property 

— How to build up a plant-wide defense program 

— How end where to moke shelters 

— How to select your Chief Warden 

— How to recruit a Defense Corps 

— How to set up a central control room 

— How to set up a first aid room 

— How to safeguard your important records 

— What to do RIGHT NOW against the possibility of 
atomic attack 




AUTHENTIC— THOROUGH — filmed with the help of 
THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF AMERICA 

TARGET: U.S.A. is based on studies made by the 
National Security Resources Board. The Research Institute o( 
America gave complete use of research facilities, advisory 
and editorial help — everything needed to make 
TARGET: L'.S.A. the most realistic, practical project 
of its kind. It was made by the makers of PATTERN FOR 
SURVIVAL (see below). It uses live action, animation, 
graphs, charts and other techniques to give you a fascinating 
film that really puts across its important message. 

TARGET: U.S.A. covers your defense problems in 
dramatic terms. It can save lives and property in factories, 
office buildings, hotels, hospitals, railroad installations ... 
every establishment where many people work or live. 



SHOW THIS URGENT FILM AS SOON AS YOU CAN 

Get in touch with your film dealer right now. For more 
information, write to Cornell Film Ciimp.in\ today. 

Available in 16mm sound, both in full color and 
black-and-wbHe. 2 reels. 

Running time, approximalely 20 minutes. 



Another Cornell Film production 

PATTERN FOR SURVIVAL 

A Doiumentory film That Oromoiiiei Perionaf 0*'*nie 
Agaimt Atomic Attack 

For homes, schools, and for the individual wherever 
he may be during on attack. Includes educational 
material on the atomic bomb. Both films together 
cover proctically oil ongles of civilion A-bomb de- 
fense. Combined running time of both important 
films is less than one hour. 



Distributed exclusively by 

0orni^li M'litn 0onipantf. 1501 Broaduav, ^r^^ ^«rk is, n.y. 



I 



10 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



PROFESSIONAL EQUIPMENT 
FOR PROVEN 



PROFESSIONAL RESULTS 






^^ 



^tmtt 




I6mm PROFESSIONAL 




3Smm BNC MO0€L 



The Same Professional 

Features Whether You Choose A 

35mm or 16mm 



THE 





Years-ahead smooth, positive operation has 
made the lamed Mitchell i5mm Omcras the 
ovcrwhchiiin>; choice ol major studio>. Incor- 
poratin.L; the same advanced truly prutcssional 
35mm features, the Mitchell ' 16" Hrofes- 
sional" Omera is bcini; selected as the stand- 
ard ecjuipment of more and more commercial 
producers The heritage of superior desifjn 
and matchless workmanship of Mitchell 
Cameras is known and proven each day by 
the creators of thv unrlJ't fxin-tl filnn. 



AND ONLY 



/ff/VcAe// 



/ff//cAe// ^/^^/W CORPORATION 

666 WEST HARVARD STREET • OLENDALE 4, CALIFORNIA • CARLE ADDRESS! -MITCAMCO" 

lASTIIN llfllSINTATIVIi THIODOII AUMAN • Sll firTM AVINUI • NIW TOIK CITY 17 • MUIBAT Nlll \'1*%% 



8S% of tbt Motion pictoroi shown in tiiootrof throvf hout flio world oro filniod with ■ Mitcholi 



M MIIKR I • VOLUME 12 • 19S1 



11 




WEIGHS LESS THAN 



13 



POUND!l 



The sound i^ evenly distributed t<> all |lart^ of iId- rixiin. I 
."oiiikI is llirowii away from part of tin- aiidiriirr tlii-\ caiino 
uii<l<-r>taii(l clearly and tli«-y lo.-c iiitcrol. 'I'Ik- cffi-rl of thi 
|(ro<;raiii is lost. 

Tlu' Model L. like all Pieliire|»lioneh. sits flat — no woldtli 
to kick tin- lifilit-prosiire needle ont of tile {iroove. it i« ihi 
one inaeliine that plays niicrojiroove records. 

I lie projector is in tlie Only practical location — at the op 
erator's finger tips. 

The inechaiiisiii can't liecoine detaclied and drop rui tlit 
floor hecaiise the liandle is attaclied to it. 



A Really Great 




Machine 



When you liiiy tlie Picturephone Sound Slide-film niaciiine yon hiiv a 
complete machine. You don't have to spend S6.0() for a zipper hag to 
keep it clean, and S6.00 for a record carrying case. These are two of 
the thirteen old hang-overs from the horse-and-huggy-days of sound slide 
film that are eliminated liy the Picturephone. 

If your audiences are very small you don't have to huy a screen hecause 
the Picturephone has a shadow-hoxed screen hnilt in. Don't he fooled 
hy a small screen that has no shadow-hox. It is worthless in a partly 
lighted room. 

This is the most completely portable machine ever huilt hy us or 
anyone else. 

Weighing only 12 pounds and 14 ounces including screen and record 
holder, you have everything in one midget size ease which requires no 
cover. 

This is the last word in portahility. Nothing e\er made was so easy 
to get around with. 

For fourteen years »c hare made the highest quality 
sound slide-film equipment known to the industry. And 
we make the largest line — ten models. Write us. 

Manujactured by 

0. J. McCLURE TALKING PICTURES 

mSV] West Washington Boulevard • CHICAGO 7, ILLINOIS I 

Telephone CAnal 6-4914 



12 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



slide film recording . . . has gone modern, too! 





Columbia 
slide M) film 
transcriptions 



give you up-to-the-minute extras at no extra cost! 



1. Finest Tape and Disc Recording Equipment Ever Assembled. 

2. Continual modernization of Studio Equipment and Facilities. 

3. Latest Developments in Pressing Manufacture and Materials. 

4. Unparalleled Reputation for Service. 

5. The Foremost List of Customers in the Country. 

These important extras at no extra cost make Columbia 
transcriptions the ultimate in the slide film industry today! 

For all these bonus advantages, why not follow the example 
of Ford Motor Co., Lincoln-Mercury, Union Carbide tt Carbon 
Co., Winthrop-Stearns, Bell Telephone. Brand Niimt-s 
Foundation, Eastman Kodak Co., Mohawk Carpet Mills. Inc. 
— to name a few among scores of satisfied Columbia clients. 



Atk for Alt The Convincing 
0«lailt. Phone. Wir«. Writ* 

Columbia 
-k transcriptions 

A Division of Columbia Records Inc 0i 
Nrw York 799 7lh Avtnu*. CIrcl* 5-7300 
Chicago: Wnglcy Building. 410 N. Michigan 
Avonuf. WHileholl 4-6000 
Lot Angfivs 8733 Aldvn Oriva, 
BRodthaw 2-5411 



9f aW V TrW. w..Si K., r s /^il "' jt.-.^. 



NUMBER 4 • YOLIME I: 



19S1 



13 



OPPORTUNITIES 
for Sponsored Film Distribution 

AVAILABLE THROUGH THE NATIONAL NETWORKS 
OF MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, INC. 



D PLANT & OFFICE EMPLOYEES: Modern has pio- 
neered the regular showing of sponsored motion 
pictures to factory and office employees. In a 
single recent month, 2,300 of these groups were 
served via the "Weekly Movie Day" plan. 



G RURAL GROUPS: Sponsored films are being made 
available via Modem to 13,000 projector-equipped 
rural township high schools — plus Granges. Farm 
Bureaus, County Agents. 4-H, and FFA groups 
in this important field. 



D SCHOOLS a COLLEGES: Over a half-million show- 
ings of sponsored films were certified by Modem 
in 1950 for showings in colleges, high schools, and 
other educational institutions. 



n DEALER SERVICE: Modem's 27 regional exchanges 
provide expert film distribution service to order for 
sponsor branch offices, field organizations, and 
dealers — promoting effective tie-ins and field 
utilization. 



G TELEVISION: Acceptable sponsored motion pic- 
tures in the public interest are being effectively 
promoted by Modem to television stations for use 
on a free sustaining basis. 



Find out how Modern services can 
economically increase the effective- 
ness of your film distribution. Mail 
this convenient checklist today! 



Zi CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS: Modem's exclusive 
"Film of the Month" plan is actively promoting 
the regular showing of sponsored films to thou- 
sands of church groups, civic and fraternal organi- 
zations, service clubs. PTA's. and other influential 
adult groups. 



_ ROAOSHOV^S: During the summer of 1950. Mod- 
ern scheduled more than 10.000 playdates for out- 
door resort and rural roadshow audiences averaging 
400 persons each in attendance. 



_l HOMEMAKERS GROUPS: A specialized phase of 
Modern's film activity is devoted to the specific 
interests of home economics education in college 
and high school classes and women's groups — 
Modern now has 50 motion pictures of this type 
in active circulation. 



„ THEATRICAL RELEASE: Modem regularly books 
sponsored short subjects in theatres nationally. 
30.000 theatre dates for multiple showings were 
booked during 1950. 



Yes, I'd like to know more about these audi- 
ences for sponsored films: 

CHECK YOUR INTERESTSi 

□ Plant-Office Employees Q Clubs - Orgoniroliont 

G Rural Groups G Roadshows 

n Schools & Colleges G Homemokers Groups 

Q Television 



fjl Oeoler Service 
Name: 



G Theotricol Releose 



Company:. 

Address: 

City: 



Stole: 



-Zone: 




MODERN TALKING PICTURE SERVICE, INC. 

,^ 4S ROCKirilLia PIAZA • NIW YORK 30, N. V. • CIrcIa A-0910 

ga 143 lAST ONTARIO STRUT • CHICAOO II, ILL. • SUparUr 7-OSia 

«13 SOUTH FLOWER STRIET • LOS ANGILES 17, CALIF. • MAdlton 9.3131 



M 



Graeme Froser Presents 10-Point 
Proof Films Are Best Ad Medium 

♦ l',KT\iini' asMiciali'il willi lh< 
iiiidio-vi.vual fn'lil iiifcls fxcasiont 
that call for pre.sentirig reasons why 
films |irovirlc a natural nifdium foi' 
iiil\<-rlisinf: and |iuiiii<' relations in 
li-ri-sts. hut sclrloni arc all the rlijc 
liriicfits i'i>llal<.'(l Ix'forc a singli 
fiallirriiif;. (/raciiii' FrasiT. assislan: 
(jciii'ral iiiaiiagiT of Crawley Filnl^ 
Liniited, did preriseiy that in a re 
lent address before the Industrial 
Ailverlisers Association of Mon 
Irc.il. Ili-rc in outline are the 1( 
advantages he impressed upon hi> 
audience: 

I 1 1 Guaranteed readership foij 
10 to .30 minutes: (2) No competi- 
tion presentation in conifortahlr 
and exclusive surroundings: l.3l 
iiiipact through loinhining sight., 
sound, iiioveineiit. drama. [)erhaps 
<'oIor. and group enthusiasm lack- 
ing to TV: (4 1 Retention — 94 per 
cent of learning is via a-v. and .35, 
per cent greater retention than by 
other methods has been proved; 
(5l Conversion, by a combination 
of understanding and emotion in 
li\iiig an experience: 

(6l Impact measurement, by 
watching and hearing audience re- 
actions: (7l Audience visibilitVn 
seeable and countable: l8l Selec- 
tive distribution, general or ar- 
laiiged l)v age group, regionally or 
iialionalK : (9l 'lime of usefulness, 
circulated for vears in contrast with 
dav or month effectiveness of most 
advertising forms: flOl Low cost, 
only a fraction of that of other 
media for 10 to .30 minutes of re- 
laxeil and undivided attention. 

Better Industry-School Relation 
Is Cornell U Conference Theme 

* ImprovpinenI of trade and tech- 
nical instruction and better public 
relations between industry and 
school will be discussed by speak- 
ers and in panels at the second 
annual professional conference July 
10 lo 12 at the New York State 
School of Industrial and Labor Re- 
lations at Cornell I'niversity. Ithaca. 
N.Y. Registration applications, with 
SI fee. should be addressed to Miss 
Lvnne Flack. Conference Center. 



You can buy titles for less than 
KNIGHT QUALITY sells for, but 
you cannot get greater value at 
any price. That's why our titles 
cost less in the long run. 

THE KNIGHT STUDIO 

341 E. Ohio Street, Chicago II. Illinois 






14 



BLSI.NEss SCKKK.N .M.\G.\ZINE 



ATTBHTION 



SOVHD msTins 

not only has the KNOW-HOW 
hut also the 

CAM 90 

For many years we have done a repeat business 
with important clients in many major industries. 

When YOU are planning to use the impact of the 
screen in any way and for any purpose - 

- LET us TALK WITH you '** 
'*' - WE HAVE SOME GOOd IDEAS ^ 



Mm. 



SounJ JiasicH, Jnc. 



165 WEST 46TH STREET — NEW YORK 19 



PHONE PLAZA 7-6600 



MOTION PICTURES 
SLIDE FILMS 
TV SHORTS AND 
COMMERCIALS 



NL'MBK K I • \(>M MK 1:; • l"*:! 




Ihe demand for fast, dependable, quality 
motion picture film processing is rapidly in- 
creasing in every community throughout the 
country, presenting an excellent opportunity 
for wide-awake film producers and local labora- 
tories. The Houston-Fearless Model 22 Devel- 
oper shown above makes it possible to provide 
this profitable service in your area with only a 
moderate investment. 

This portable machine develops I6mm black 
and white, negative, positive or reversal films. 



HOUSTON 
FEARLESS 



It is self-contained, entirely automatic and easy 
to operate. Complete refrigeration, re-circulat- 
ing systems, air compressor and positive tem- 
perature controls. Operates in daylight, han- 
dling the entire job from camera to screen. 
Model 22 is the same high Houston-Fearless 
quality that has been standard of the motion 
picture industry in Hollywood and throughout 
the world for 20 years. Other I6mm and 35mm 
Houston-Fearless black and white and color 
equipment toserve your particular requirements. 

Write for information on specially-built 
equipment for your specific needs. 

DEVELOPING MACHINES • COLOR PRINTERS • FRICTION HEADS 
COLOR DEVELOPERS • DOLLIES • TRIPODS • PRINTERS • CRANES 



11801 W. OLYMPIC BLVD • LOS ANGELES 64, CALIF. 

"WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF MOTION PICTURE PROCESSING EQUIPMENT" 



IIIIHI) KDITIO.N OF THE I.M)K\ OK JKAIM.Nc, KIL.M.s .NOW AN AILAHLK 

♦ The Third Kdilion of The Index of Training Irainiiip and vocational , lassroom use is m..w avail- 

hilms. w,dely-u«-d and aathoritalive referent-,- al.j.-. Nearly 28(X) titles are listed, together with 

l.st.ng all free-loan, rental and loK-,-..st purchase complete sources. TllE I.NDEX lists at onlv S2.00. 

sou,..l hlins and slidefilnis available for industrial Order todav from Business Screen, Chicago 11 



Howland Heods AFCA in Chicago; 
DeVry is Nomed a Vice President 
♦ CoLo.NEi. John R. Howland, di- 
j rector of product research of the 
Slewarl-Wariicr Corp., is the new 
prisid.nl of the Chicago Chapter 
of the AitMEi) Forces Commlnica- 
TioNs Association, elettcd at a pre- 
vacation dinner meeting for which 
President William C. DeVry of tli.- 
DeVry Ct)rp. had made arrange- 
ments and provided spciial jirogram 
features. 

Colonel liowland succeeds Oliver 
Read, editor of Radio and Tele- 
vision News, who was given a stand- 
ing vote of thanks for his services 
the past two years. The new vice 
presidents are William C. DeVry. 
Dwiglil fJrown. James II. Kellogg 
and Carringtoii H. Stone. Secretary- 
Treasurer Raymond K. Fried was : 
reelected. Board members besides 
Howland. Brown. Read. Fried. Kel- 
logg and Stone include Ral[)h 
Brengle. C. G. Duncan-Clark. Ben- 
nett W. Cooke. Theodore S. Gary. 
Frank Meade, and Colonel Samuel 
R. Toff. Fried. Gary and Read were 
named to the National Council. 

E. W. D'Arcy. chief engineer of 
the DeVry company, traced the his- 
tory of the company since its found- 
ing in 1913 by H. A. DeVry. and 
reviewed the development of the 
DeVry portable special service 
16mm projector for the Armed 
Forces. President-F^lecl Howland 
urged broader cooperation bv in- 
dustry and by more persons within 
member companies in the liaison 
work of the a.ssociation between the 
platiners of military preparedness 
and the public. 

University Film Producers Open 
Full Conference Program Aug. 13 
♦ Members of the University Film 
Prodl'cers Association, limited to 
individuals in educational institu- 
tions whose duties involve the pro- 
duction of teaching films, will bene- 
fit from panels on television, on the 
L . S. State Department film pro- 
gram, university courses on produc- 
tion and the planning and making 
of films on a revolving fund basis, 
al the fifth annual conference. 
August l.S to 17 on the campus of 
Indiana I niversilv, at Blooming- 
tun. Harold M. Otwell is chairman 
iif llie program, which also will in- 
clude an address on animation, 
demonstrations of new equipment 
and processes, and at least seven 
■iireening sessions. 



SPLICES NOT HOLDING? 

Try 

Jefrona AU-Purpose Cement! 



If ritr tor Irrn \nmpfr 

Camera Eqyipmtnt Company 

1400 Broadway. N. Y. 19. N. Y. 



16 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



LEADER in slide film recording 

. . . because RCA VICTOR 
is convinced 




Contact an RCA Victor Custom Record 
Soles Studio, Dept. 6E: 

NEW YORK: 630 Fifth Avenue 

New York 20, New York 
JUdion 2-5011 



Write for our Custom Record Brochure today! 



A slide film 
should 
sound as good 
as it looks I 



Your slide film recording requires the same expert care as the 
film itself. RCA Victor — through its 50 years of research and 
experience in the reproduction of sound and the latest 
electronic techniques — gives you a thoroughly engineered 
record and complete, efficient service in . . . 



RECORDING 



PROCESSING 



PRESSING 



-k The most modern sound-reproducing equipment and facilities... 
latest developments in automatic frame-progression recording. 

■^ Engineers, specializing in slide film recording, assure the best 
presentation of your slide film story. 

if Pure Vinyl-Plastic records — both standard and microgroove — 
packaged in special slide film shipping cartons when desired. 

ir An extensive music library service. 

"k Careful handling and prompt delivery. 

CHICAGO: 445 North lake Shore Drive HOLLYWOOD: 1016 North Sycamore Avenue 

Chicago II, Illinois Hollywood 38, California 

Whitehall 4-3215 Hillside 5171 




custom 
record 
sales 



Radio Corporation of America 
RCA Victor Division 



^h 



NUMBER 4 • VOLUME 12 * I9S1 



i: 



PRODUCTION LINES i -iiu'i'^"-ij- •••i 



(.HDD MA\S: ll> altta>s 
iiood news when imc of our 
rlieiils roifivos an award on 
.1 lilin Wf prndiircil for llii'in. 
And now llif \\ onu'Ms Ad- 
\crli>inf; (llnli of llhicapo 
(or whom we produred Do 
Yol Bki.onc in An\ Kicris- 
INr. y has received one of ihe 
most coveted awards in ad- 
xertisiiii; the Advertisinf; 
Federation of America 
award for "outstanding; 
achievemenl in adverlisiu" education." 



I><) ) oil Rfliin/: ill tilfiTtisiiip}' is a sound, 
cohir ^lidetiini |irodiiced lo «/i»i(('r a nrrd 
anions hi^h ><liool and colle;;e students — to 
^i\e Noun;; people an honest presentation of 
the ad\crli>int: profession . . . the kinds of 
joh- it hohls wliat it lakes to heconie iiiiali- 




fied wl 



I'onie ipial 
lere eniplo\nient opportunities exist 
and what is expected of the advertising 
irker once he secures a joh. 



K\\.U\ I'KOFESSIONAL OK Tl{\l)i; 

r.Koii-. k\i:kv branch oi- indisthy 

HAS A SIMH.AH JOB TO DO— to tell ynm<, 
people whats ahead if thev should choose a par- 
ticular vocation. It's a responsihility lo the kids 
and an ohiigation to the industry in which you 
work. A wise decision by teen-agers now bene- 
fits them, as well as the industry thev hope, 
eventually, to ser\-e. . . 



Schools, colleges. f^TA ornanizalions and 
'■ihers have indicated a strong demand for vo- 
cational guidance materials — slidefilms. motion 
pictures, and booklets — ])repared not by educa- 
tors alone, but bv people actively working in the 
iniluslry, cooperating with educators. This way 
they get the down-to-earth facts. 



W, 



.e would like to show \ou how graphic a 
film (an be in doi uinenting various kinds of 
jobs . . . interestingly and triitbfiilly. And we 
w(»uld like you to think about the ways this 
kind of film might apjdy to your own trade 
or profession — or your own companv. 



Simple, straightforward sound slidefilms and 
movies, tailored to the individual needs of the 
sponsoring group and the student audience — 
and. incidentally, TAII,OJ{F,I) TO A BUDGET, 
can be so efTective in this vocational guidance 
field — that we'd like to see more and more 
groups pUiming them. 



LET US SHO>\ VOL Ol K \0» ATIONAI. 

GUIDANCE HLMS, AND 01 R OTHER 

RF.rENT RELEASES. CAM. ON IS 

FOR s(:reemn(;s. 




DALLAS JONES 



•^ PRODUCTIONS 

1725 North Wells Street 

Chicago 14, Illinois 



State College of Washington Will 
Appraise Technical Films for ECA 

■* The Kconomic Cooperation Administration 
( KCA I and the .State College of Washington 
have just signed a contract under which the 
college will appraise motion pictures and film- 
strips for use in the Marshall I'laii louiitries. 
In effect, the contract will further iinpjcini'nt a 
ti'chniipic alrcadv being used to assist the Mar- 
shall Plan countries in a wider distribution of 
agriculture, technical training, and human rela- 
tions films as applied to |)roductivit\. 

Ulins are not being selected fur their popular 
appeal, but for their usefulness with audiences 
in the Marshall I'lan countries embracing 
all levels of productivity, i.e.. shop worker, 
farmer, and management. Five to six thousand 
films are to be "digested" by June. 1952: three 
thousand or more of them during this summer. 

Series of Checks on Each Sub.iect 

Before being recommended, each film is un- 
dergoing the closest scrutiny. First it is being 
checked by a trained audio-visual specialist, who 
writes a digest and evaluates it in terms of story, 
photography, sound, and audience appeal. He 
either rejects it or recommends its further 
screening by a subject matter specialist. 

Those 50 or 60 per cent of the films which 
pass muster with the audio-visual specialists are 
reviewed by technical experts in the field of the 
film's subject matter. For the most part these 
are faculty members from the College's Institute 
of Technology. Institute of Agricultural Science, 
and School of Economics and Business. These 
men are judging the films from the standpoint 
of technical accuracy, recency of techniques and 
equipment shown, audiences to which u.seful. 
and general applicability to industrial, agricul- 
tural, and commercial enterprises. 

ECA expects to select some 1500 film subjects, 
based on the digests and appraisals it receives. 
I'nder a separate contract. Movies En Route of 
New York City will arrange for the procurement 
and delivery of negatives of those films ECA 
selects. 

Search for Material Mv.iok Problem 

The State College project staff is finding search 
one of its biggest problems. It is expected to 
.screen films already produced bv industrial con- 
cerns, agricultural, educational. |)rivate and 
governmental sources, but it is finding that much 
of the sponsored and industrial training material 
which meets its specifications is uncatalogued. 
Thev must be dug out on the basis of tips, leads 
and plain guesswork. Alreadv. however, thou- 
sands of letters are going out over the signature 
of project dire<tor Howard Kresge. The message 
is always the same: "Any assistance which you 
can render us in finding information and later 
obtaining films for preview and appraisal will 
be deepK apprc<iated. Very trulv \ours. The 
ECA Film Project. State College of Washington. 
Pullman. Washington."' JJ" 

Editor's Note: The Editors of Bi sivkss 
S< iieen are cooperating with this highh useful 
review program and urge business film sponsors 
and producers to do likewise. 



Use 3-Dimension 
Color Transparencies to 
HELP YOUR SALESMEN SELL 



STEPS TO 

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Please rush FREE stereo culting and mounting 
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BUSINESS SCREEN MAGAZINE 



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A FEW FACTS AHOIT Al DIG' 




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AUDIO PRODUCTIOMS, I IM 

PRODUCERS OF MOTION PICTURES 

fi30 NINTH AVENUE • FILM CENTER BUILDIN(. • \KW YORK. 



A >l h: << S A 4ii K OV KKV l>l IMMtTA.Xri^: TO rO.>IIV\.\V IMI i:.SI IIKI.XTK 

Explaining What to Whom 



hy Clari-iu-<- H. Kiiiidall. I'ri->iti<-iit. Iiilainl Stt-t-l <ii)iii|>aiiy^ 



THK Amkkican Knikki-kisf. System is on 
trial lliriruf-'lioiit tlie wurld. W'c must rec- 
opni/.f that. In fact. Tin not sure but it's 
a rear-guard action, lin not sure but we're pro- 
tectinp the last zone from which the counter- 
attack can be made. 

And all of our business thinking must be 
directed towards the conservation of this great 
heritage that exists in the /Vmerican enterprise 
system. 

And that is a very challenging thing. 
1 propose to talk about the "what"" and "to 
whom. "" but ver\ litllc almul the "how." 

No "lit'-t \\a\"" In Idea C.oniniiinication 

1 claim that there is no best way for the com- 
munication of ideas, and that the strength of 
the American enterprise system in our democ- 
racy lies in the infinite variety which we bring 
to the solution of our (iroblems. I'nder the 
totalitarian way of life, there is always one way. 
If it happens to be a good way, they get part 
ways with it. But if it's a bad way, it's a funda- 
mental weakness in their whole concept, which 
has no hedge whatsoever. 

We hedge our risk of failure by doing all of 
these things differently, and we learn from one 
another in conferences of this kind by exchang- 
ing ideas. 

So, I lea\e the question of the media to the 
experts. 

And as to the "to whom." I would like to 
make this preliminary observation: In my 
jndgmi'ni. there is onlv one group to whom we 
must comnmnicale the explanation of Ameri- 
can business, and that group is people. There 
are people among enipluyres, and people 
among stockholders, and jH-ople among educa- 
tors and clergymen, and the m\lhical man in 
the street; and what will wurk with people in 
one situation will work with people in all situ- 
ations, be<-aus«' all people arc people. 

You will find amongst people some who are 
la/y and indilTerenI in their thinking, who 
never hcdd convictions ileepiv or the -nine idea 
for long. Anil llic\ ma\ be disregarded bet-ause 
they don't cnunf. 

(iood ("ili/rns Kvrry where Seek Truth 
Hut among all |)eople, everywhere, there are 
ihiiughtful, sober-minded, good ritizrns, who 
sci'k the truth and who wish to adjust their con- 
duct to the right when thev understand it; and 
that kind of jxTson is ju«t the same whether he 
is an employee or a stockholder or the man on 



the strift; and he probably exists in about the 
same proportions in all groups. 

And he is our target. 

\\c seek to explain to the man who wants 
to know, the truth, the merits, and values that 
inhere in the American enlerpri.se system. 

The "what" I shall begin with 1 take it that 
in e\ery field of human affairs, it is under- 
standing that counts. 

Men quarrel and iiali<ins quarrel when they 
don't understand one another. It is \er\ seldom 
thai two men square off and call each other 
names, after each fully, honestly understands 
the other s point of view. 

\^1ien that occurs, the\ may agree to dis- 
agree, but they part without anger, and often 
with nnitual respect; arul that is true as between 
nations. 

1 feel very certain that wc du not understand 
Russia, and it would seem quite clear that Rus- 
sia docs not understand us. And if there were 
only .some way that mutual understanding could 
be brought about, peace might How from an 
agreement to disagree. 

And therefore, at the basis of all good c(mi- 



*• RlKlMmi SUVIIKN vprrUI |>r< ••■niatinn nf lh« rhKllrnrlns 
wliln** prmniud by Mr. Kanilall at th> ° F.ipUlnInc 
Your HiiHlnrMi" Confrn-nr* sponMirvd by th« Chamber of 
C<Jmm.-r.-,. ..f Ih,' Unllwl Sum at Chlraaoi lUlnola on 
Junr M, I'.I.M. 




JSjI j% 



nmnif-ation. In whatever group and parlicu- 
larK to employees lies understanding. 

It seems to me. therefore, that the l>eginning 
of a good explanation of business is the under- 
standing of business, and that must go from the 
top man down. 

It's no good building an expensive power lin< 
if you haven't got a generating station at the 
beginning of it. It's no good having a pipeline, 
whether for petroleum or the communication of 
ideas, if there is nothing in the tank against 
which to start the pumps. The beginning of all 
cimunuriication is an idea. If the boss man 
hasn't got an idea, if there is nothing he under- 
stands and believes with clarity and deep con- 
viction, he can get the best public n-lations con- 
sultant in the world, and he'll get nowhere with 
explaining his business to his omplovees. 

riie thing we need (irst of all is clarity as to 
what it is we l)elieve. and then earnestnes* and 
depth of conviction; and if we get to that point, 
the rest will come easilv. 

Do ^ on Speak < hit Mioiil Kiisinpss? 

Now. 1 d like to pause at that point to sa> 
I am conducting here loda\ an experiment in 
which I hope to prove a point. This room is 
bristling with brass today — presidents and 
chairmen. Top executives of companies through- 
out the Middle West are c<incfaled all about 
\ou. might e\en Ih- sitting next to vou. might 
even ]»• in your chair. Kvery man in this room 
who bears an important responsibility is fre- 
quently asked to address gatherings. He's asked 
lo talk to his employees, or his church, or his 
kiwanis Club, or his trade a.H.s<H'iation, or his 
chand>er of commerce. 

And most of you duck it. 

And all of you are, most of the time, in ter- 
ror of it. And that I can't understand. 

Is the fad thai >ou lan't talk about business 
without writing it on a piece of pjiper by an\ 
chance because you don't unilerstund busincs*; 
or I)clicve in it":" 

How is it when you call on \our l>rsl cus- 
tomer? The president id a conqianv calling 
upon the president <d hi« U-st customer is never 
inarticulate. He swmips down upon him like a 
liger arizing a goal. You can't slop him. IietaunR 
he's so utterlv conxinc-d that the product he's 
got is the |m-s| prinhict in the woild. The words 
take «ha|>p by themsrUrs and just flow from 
him. 

Ib.w !>■■ ^ iMi Feel Miout Dlir Svalrni!" 
Do you frri that wav about the Xmeriran 

business sv stent/ 

Are you thai much on lire.' 

Do you know ns nuich about it as \>>u do 

alMtut vour prinluct .' kivkni 



M \1 It h H I 



\ ( 1 1 I \\y 12 • 1 ') :, 1 



21 



Explaining What to Whom: 

l(l)NriMKl) muM IIIK l'KK< KDIM. IMI.KI 

If Mill ilo. \\\t\ caul Miu ^^lallIl ii|> aiiil talk 
about it? 

There seems to he aliniail the iiiipression thai 
somewhere ihere is u leisure class of cxei-utives. 
who have ihi- lime, and the eiier«;>, and the 
freedom from responsihilitN that means ihev eaii 
make talks like this. In these parts the impres- 
sion is that the name of that leisure class is 
Kandall. 

1 want \oii lo rememlier these words. I want 
vou. next time the Kiuanis calls up at quarter 
of twelve and sa\s the speaker has failed them — 
1 want vou to go on over and let them have it, 
like I'm lellin<: \ou have it today. 

And 111 tell \ou now the secret. The ex[ieri- 
ment that I am conducting, nu friends, is that 
I have made ahsiduteh no preparation what- 
ever for this address this noon. 

I hold some deep convictions. I'm goin;; to 
sa> to you today the things that my associates 
hear around the ofliie. that mv wife pets at 
night, that the hoys <;ct on the trains, that an\- 
hody gets who gets within speaking distance of 
me. 

And I would like to urge vou, when vou stand 
up in front of your employees, to forget vour 
hesitancy ahout it and let them have it. just as 
Miu Would if you were sitting in your ofhce. 
.So here we go on the "what." 

Let's Begin With Triple A Suhjeets 

I think first of all we might as well start with 
the Triple A sul)je<ts. 

No man can explain the American business 
system lo his employees unless he understands 
the present impact of world affairs on Ameri- 
can business and holds precise ideas about it. 

1 think we are all convinced that the present 
administration in its foreign policy is in a sad 
bungle. If you ask nie, in one sentence, to ex- 
|)ress the present American foreign policy, I 
would say: \^'e |)r<>po,se to fight half of the 
world, feed the other half, and have business as 
usual at home. And that can't be done. 

1 have been tremendously interested in the 
MacArthur episode. I shall express no opinion 
whatever concerning it. but I have been tremen- 
dously interested in the emotional reaction of 
the American people to the return of (Jeneral 
MacArthur. 

And 1 .say to you that the great preponder- 
ance of the people who stood on the curb and 
cheered didn't know what they were cheering. 
They didn't know what it was that they were 
for, and if we polled all the people in this 
room we'd get a strange mosaic of what they 
think should or .should not be done by America 
in her foreign affairs. 

^ el. isn't it clear that what happens in Korea, 
or licrlin. or Iran, can have more impact in 
the next twelve months on yi>ur business than 
anything you can do about it? 

And it is very important if you are going to 
explain business to your employees that you 
have an intelligent, positive idea of what our 
foreign policy should be. other than invective 
against the administration. 

Don't forget that your employees' boys are 



doing the dying; and cjon'l U\ t,, i.ilk t,, ihcm 
unless you know, in \oiir own mind, what you 
think the I'nited States should do. <illici ijian 
ha\<' an election. 

The same is true in the domestic area. Do we 
in the business world really understand the 
economic problems of America today, such as 
inflation? Have you a clear idea that you can 
tell anybody as to what inflation is. other than 
llir lihiiikcl\lilaMk W ;isliiMgloM adriiinisli alion V 

Start By Being For Something 
You know that whatever they do is wrong. 
You're committed to that. But you can't be for- 
ever formulating your imderslanding of the 
American economy in opposing a ])articular 
administration. ^Ou've got lo stop being against 
something: you've got to start being for some- 
thing. 

Furthermore, when you get to talking with 
your employees, remember they voted for this 
administration — and you're not going to get 
very close to them with your profanity, unless 
you've got an understanding of the problem. 
Have you an opinion on controls? 
You don't like the controls in your business; 
that's clear. Do you want to take them all off? 
Better think that one over. If you're going to 
be against controls, you've got to be prepared 
to take the consequences of taking them off. 
How about taxes? 

You're perfectly certain that the proposed 
tax bill is wrong. Do you know why? 

Supposing somebody walked up and said: 
"All right. Wise Guy. you write the tax bill!" 
Can you write a tax bill for the I'nited 
States? I don't mean in detail. 

Have you got an idea of where the revenue 
shouJd come from to support our debt? 

We've got the debt; there's no doubt al)out 
that. You think it ought to be paid off. Have 
you got a clear idea of where the monev should 
come from? 

Well, you know you shouldnl |ia\ it. hut are 
you clear as to who should pay it? Is it fair 
to yell about controls and false economy in high 
places if you haven't thought through, vourself. 
what is the sound tax basis? 

When you start talking to your cinpiovees 
they II ask you some questions on that, but it's 
no good talking to them until you've got an an- 
swer. 

I don't care whether you've got the right an- 
swer or not. as long as it's your answer; as Ion" 
as it's held with integrity; as long as you can 
talk about it with your voice down and be 
pleasant. 

Why Do '^ on Believe in Free Knterprise? 

And, now, what about the svstcni of free en- 
terprise itself? 

What is there in it that you believe in? And 
why do you believe it? Just bet ause it makes 
money for you? That's what the connnunisis are 
telling your Workers. 

■^ou won't get very close to your employees 
by telling them that you're in it just to make 
money, because that's what the < ommics are 
telling them, and that's whv we're going 
towards socialism. 

They don't trust guvs like m,u. that liaxc no 



interest in anything els<- except making monev. 
You've got to gel abovi- that. 

No, the reason you believe in the enterpris<- 
system is that you're honestly convinced that il 
brings the greatest good lo the greatest number 
of people; and you have the whole world f.u 
your laboratory to demonstrate that truth. 

You're not ashamed of profit. Vou know thai 
the incentive of the desire to make money is a 
worthy thing; but you also know that it's the 
striving that counis in terms of the good of the 
people. 

But the free cnl(T|)rise syst<mi i^^n't just a 
"hunting license.'" It carries its obligations; and 
one that I hear talked about le.ss and would 
like to hear talked about more — and frankly jj 
and openly — is that the free enterprise system 
must be policed by a free markrt. 

Competition HoKIs Ts On the Beam 
Free enterprise has a tendeniv to make each 
of us selfish. We are held on the beam toward 
the |>rotection of the public welfare by honest, 
direct, vital, real competition; and any man 
who directly or indirectly, bv private agreement 
or private understanding, attempts lo limit the 
free market for his goods, is asking for nation- 
alization. 

I should know. 1 have many friends in the 
British steel industry. They asked for it. 
They went that way. They were afraid of the 
free market, and they turned to government 
for a controlled market. They asked for 
price agreements because they feared the im- 
pact of honest competition, and they got 
ihcm.selves nationalized. 

.And if you want to bring on the end of 
free enterprise, just go on taking part in the 
limitation of free markets. We can't have the 
benefits and not accept the responsibilities. 
We've got to play the game honestly with re- 
gard to the free market. 



Social Kesjionsibility of Enterprise 

.\nd the other side is the social responsibility 
of the free enterprise system. 

The world has demonstrated that there will 
be no more social vacuums. People crave the 
good things of life, and they believe that we 
don't want them to have those good things. .And 
if \iiu «ant to give us a long shove down the 
road towards socialism, ignore the social prob- 
lems of your communitv. 

But if \ou want to preserve the heritage of 
free enterprise, get in there and pitch, and make 
everybody in your organization pitch. Make 
your town the best town to live in, and you'll 
get the best workmen. Forget your town and 
let it go into decay, and vou'll be strangled for 
good workmen, because today the workingman 
is discriminating. He wants to bring: up his 
children in a community where there are good 
.schools and good churches and good recrea- 
tional facilities, and a fine moral tone lo the 
town. 

The same applies to education 

I have bi-en tremendouslv interested lo see 
how industry has come to the point where it is 
willing III be active in the support of institu- 
tions for higher learning in the technical 
studies, and has been very hesitant in the liberal 
arts studies; and yet today the problems that 



22 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAG.AZINE 



are plaguing industr\ arc nol iIidsc rauwd b) 
inadequate technology. 

PossibI) we \<" got too much technology. The 
problems that are plaguing us today are not in 
the realm of facts, but ideas and ideals, and you 
la<'klc those in the liberal arts institutions. 

Now we ha\e line state universities through- 
out the country. Hut do \ou want ever\ univer- 
sity to be stale-controlled and state-financed? 
Isn't there a grave danger that eventually gov- 
•ernment will dire<-t the policy of teaching if 
ever) institution becomes publiilv oh ned and 
publii'K -operated';" 

The state institutions are kept on the beam 
by the standards set by the privately-endowed 
institutions: and those institutions cannot sur- 
vive and maintain t^iose high standards of free 
inquirv without help from the .Vmerican busi- 
ness groups. 

Now, here are some of the "whats" that 1 
have in mind. 

There are several road blm-ks before us. 

F^ilucation Begins Vi itli Supervisors 

In the field of educating the emplovee. one 
of the road blocks is the senior supervisor and 
the foreman. You cannot go around them in 
communicating ideas to vour workers. ^ ou must 
go through them. 

And by tradition the\ aren't men who have 
ever thought it their business to communicate 
ideas to anvbodv. Thev keep the machines run- 
ning, .nnd go hon\e at night and wash their 
hands, and watch the television. That is true 
even at the senior level. 

And when the president writes a letter to the 
home of the employee to explain his business, it 
isn't going to help much if the next morning 
the worker asks his foreman a question idimit 
that letter which he cant answer. 

I don't know just how to do this part of it. 
1 in bound to say I think part of it is the func- 
tion of technical education, and I sa\ that not 
crilirallv be<aus<> heaven knows the man on the 
production line must have technical compe- 
tence. But he has been so busy in these compe- 
titive davs, petting the ne<es.sarv te<-hnical com- 
|H-tence, that he has sometimes lost interest in 
.«<H'ial and economic problems, and certainlv 
has become inarticulate. 

But we've got to find a way for the boss 
man's enthusiasm about the connnunication of 
ideas to get down through the senior supervisor 
and the foreman. Thev should know the opin- 
iims of the boss man, believe in them, not as a 
ilireetive. but for the content of the idea it.self. 
and until they think and believe and work at it. 
a.H though it were a part of their job to spread 
eiliiialion about American business. 

Koad Blocks in .Stockholder Relations 
I am aware, quiti- rtientlv, of one verv .seri- 
ous road block in the stockholder relationship: 
and this is close to the emplovee subjei I. 

It seems to me that its awfullv important 
that a stockholder of mv companv living in l^s 
•\ngeles know what goes on in our plant, and 
understand the problem of the relationship with 
the rmplovee. 

\^e ought to tell that M<K-kholder our opin- 
ions on social and « onoinic questions that aflect 
the business, and we are blurkrd ofl fnmi a 



verv important segment of our stockholders liv 
an accident. 

I don't know how iiianv of you have thought 
of this point, but in our company, over twenty 
|>er cent of the stockholders do not ap|)ear on 
our records. Their slock is held in the name of 
nominees, a trust company, or some olhc-r insti- 
tution, and we never have direct access to the 
stockholder for communication. And I think 
something must be done about it. 

Women Oun Business: Do Tliey Knmc It'' 

A major portion of thos«,- |)eople are women. 
We hear it said that the women of America 
own .American induslrv, and I guess they do. 
They outlive us boys by about ten to fifteen 
years per man, per ton. 

Joe. you see, was busy when he was living, 
he didn't have time to explain to Jane anything 
about business: and he thought, anyhow, that 
she was too sweet to explain anything about it 
to her. But off he went with a coronarv. anri 
she writes to her bank and says. "I know noth- 
ing about these things. Here are some papers 
that I found in the box." 

The banker says. "We'll relieve you of all 
that matter. It will be verv simple." 

Once a month he sends her a remittance for 
ten dividends, including that of our companv. 
I he fellow that stands it in is a trained analyst. 
He's a statistician, and he knows all about de- 
preciation, and taxes, and so on. and he tells 
her: " Thev "re solvent: the dividend seems se- 
cure, period." 

He hasn't the slightest interi-st in the social 
problems we're struggling with. 

Wc send him our stuff, and he heaves it in 
the wastebaskel. We got back from one institu- 
tion over six hundred copies of our annual re- 
port, which thev had refused to send out to 
stockhcdders. because thev said thev didn't have 
th«' funds to cover the mailing ex|)ense. There is 
a road block to comnuinicalions that must be 
broken down. 

It's ihe women of this countrv that own 
American industry: it's the women who vote: 
and the women are voting us into socialization 
because they don't understand the American in- 
dustry from which they draw their income. 

I must add mic more point. 

Workers .Should If ant Slock Participation 
S|ieaking of stockholders, the ultimale edu- 
cation of the worker, the payoff, is for him to 
know so much about vour l>u>ines- that he 
wants to become a .••tockhidder. We have |nvn 
teaching him nol to take a chance. In our War 
Bond campaigns, we tidd him there was onlv 
one good sj-curily. namely. I ncle Sam and his 
bond. 

We have told him never to risk anything. 
We've got to leach the workingnian profit and 
loss. We've got to teach him to risk for gain. 
And the place lo do it is in our own businrs.*. 
We can't ilragoon him into it. We must have 
him come in l)ccau!»e he wants to, and he will 
come in if. in fad, we have been successful in 
explaining our l>usinei«« to him. and he will 
come in with pride and the enthusiasm, and he 
will open, then, the U'«t possible nvrnur of 
communication. |^ 



Nalional A- V Convention 



JAVA MEETS IN CHICAGO JULY 30 

■tt Inspirational addresses by national authori- 
ties on public and human relations, a-v training 
ai<ls for the militarv, and Governmental policy 
on defense production will supplant the open 
forum ty|<e of program at this year's convention 
of the .National .Audio-Visual Association in 
Chiiago Julv 2K through 'il. with the Hotel 
Sherman as headquarters. 

Three speakers announced are: Clarence .\. 
Peters, of the National (^inference <»f Christians 
and Jews: Conunander Kobert P. Noe. U. S. 
Navv Special Devices, Port Washington. N. Y., 
and Nathan I). Golden, director of the Motion 
Picture and Photographic Division. National 
Production Authority. .Announcement of a 
fourth speaker of note awaits completion of ar- 
rangement.s. according to Milt Stark, chairman 
of the program commitU-e, which met in New 
York June 2 and 3. 

Join- W illi Constituent (>roups 

Organizations which will have their own 
meetings in conjunction and will participate in 
the NA\ A gathering include the Industrial 
.Audio-Visual .Association: the Educational Film 
Library Association, meeting July 26 and 27; 
and the Film Council of America. July 2*). The 
NA\ A Business Show is Julv 2}{ through .'il. 

The IA\ \. which takes its place as a con- 
stituent group at this years NA\.A convention 
along with the other a-v organizations, will 
meet Julv 'M) at a formal luncheon to lie fol- 
lowed by an afternoon program with a three- 
fold agenda: discussion of new research proj- 
e<'ts for management recognition of films; dis- 
cussion of program ideas for the lAV.A's an- 
nual fall meeting in New York, and special top- 
ics to be announced. 

N W \ I raile Show to .S-t Kecord 

I rging lot) per cent I AN .A attendance at the 
convention, which will pres<'nt an opportunity 
to dis<'uss individual problems and learn the 
latest developments in the a-v field, I). F. 
Steinke, recording seiretarv. offers assurance 
that this year's Trade Show will s<'t a new high 
for complete exhibition of equipment, films and 
devices. This is borne out by the N.AVA an- 
nouncement that the exhibit area will be a blcM-k 
long bv use of the (irand Ballroom which is on 
the mezzanine door and connects dire<-tly into 
the main exhibit hall. Keservations indicate a 
sell-out of the 110 booths. Monday and Tuesdav 
afterniMins are Iwing given over to attendance 
at the Trade Show, which will l>e open from 
noon until (i o'clock. 

A trailer-truck load of the Navv's late.-! >\h-- 
cial devices and training aids will supplement 
('ommander Noe's contribution to the conven- 
tion program. One of ihe devices is an aircraft 
flight simulator which |>erniits the trainer In 
operate all engine controls fur a simulated 
multi-engine plane trip. 

Hotel reservations applications shixild be ad- 
dressed to Miss I'jitherine Lowery, Reservations 
Manager. Hotel Sherman, Randolph and Clark 
sts., Ciiicagt) L III. i^ 



N I M K h K » 



\ () 1. 1 M K 12 



list 



23 




LI \i:ili:0\ GUESTS of HONOK at HOSrUN imlmU- ll. lo r. ahovfl Mrs. Muriel C. Javi'lin, 
Council secretary; Edward l( . Palmer. Council vice-president: Rev. John E. Thomas. General Festi- 
val Chairman: O. H. f.oelln. Jr.. piihlishcr of Business Screen: Rev. Timolliv F. O'Leary. president 
oj the Crealer lioslon Film Council: John I), lirown. ojjicial City Creeler: Rahbi Irving A. Mandel, a 
Council director: ami Man F. l.ydiard. treasurer oj the lilni council. 



Boston Holds First Annual Film Festival 

BISINESS, CIVIC AM) HELKJIOUS (;R()L PS JOIN IN MAY 26 EVENT 



AFl l-L DAY'S program <>f film shnwings 
in eight siTeening rooms and an all-Bos- 
ton luncheon at the Copley-Plaza Hotel on 
Saturday. May 26 marked the inauguration of 
that city's first annual Film Festival under llu- 
auspices of the Film Council of Greater Boston. 
In the planning of the Fesli\al. husiness. civic 
and religious groups ])articipated under the lead- 
ership of the Reverend John E. Thomas, Massa- 
chusetts Council of Churches, as General Chair- 
man, assisted by Ralph Pfeiffer. Pan-American 
Wcirld Airuays ( Arrangements I ; Robert E. 
Segal. Jewish Community Council (Axvardsl; 
(Jeorge E. Roghaar. New England Film -Service, 
Inc. (Program I; William H. Merrigan, Stop & 
Shop. Inc. and Alan F. Lvdiard. John Hancock 
Life Insurance Company i Publicitv i : and Mrs. 
Muriel C. Javelin. Boston Piibli, Library I Reg- 
istration I. 

With the CouiK il's President. Reverend Tim- 
otli\ F. O'Lear) of the Department of Education, 
Vrchdiocese of Boston, presiding, a formal 
lun<heon program included a tribute from the 

Rk(;Istkatio\ Opkns for lioston's first annual 
Film Festival on May 26. 



Maviir (if Hiisliin. represented by City Greater 
John U. Brown, and a key address by O. H. 
Coellii. Jr.. editor and publisher of Business 
SiKKTN. The luncheon speaker outlined brieflv 
ihe histor\ of the Film Council movement in the 
I nitcd .Stales and spoke of current problems and 
responsibilities facing 16mm film users, whether 
in industry, education, religion, or other com- 
munit) groups. 

Awards to films in special dassilicalions in- 
cluding Amateur Motion Pictures, Arts & Crafts. 
Education. Industry. Recreation, and Religion 
were made on the basis of jury selections bv 
pre-Festival screenings and by the votes of audi- 
ences at the Festival. Selection chairmen in- 
cluded: Mrs. Charlotte Warshaw ;im<I Mrs. Muriel 
Javelin ( Adult Education i : Dr. Abraham Kras- 
ker ((Classroom and Amateur Films I : Alan F. 
Lydiard, Edward \V. Palmer. Lyman Thurston, 
and A. P. Williams ( Industry i; Robert K. 
Voight and Alvin G. Kenney (Recreation. Arts 
& Crafts I and lliree religious leaders. |J|f 

PliKVIKW SCREEMNC AUDIENCE icatches a saicly 
film srreeninii at the Boston Festival. 



Awar<l-\V iiiiiiiif: Film St'leptioiKi 
at tlie Boston Kilin Ketitivai 

*•»<■♦< 

FREEDOM FILMS 

"Big Idea" 

))ii.iliiccd by W ilding Picture Productions, 

Inc., for Swift & Company. 

PIBLIC RELATIONS 

"Tlie American (Cowboy" 
produced by MPO Productions 
for the ford Motor Company. 

HONORABf.E MENTION 

"The W ill to Be Renienibered" 

Barre. Vermont. Granite Association. 

SAFETY FILMS 

"Anil Then Tlieri- Vi ere Four" 

produced l>y Roland Reed Productions 

for General Petroleum Corporation. 

HONORAIII.E MENTION 

"Closed Book" 
produced by Wilding Picture Productions, 
Inc.. for the Farm Bureau Insurance Cos. 

ADLLT EDUCATION 

"Angry Boy" 
produced by AITiliated Film Producers, 
Inc.. for the Mental Health Film Board. 

HONORABLE MENTION 
"Survival Under Atomic Attack" 
produced by United World Films. Inc. 

ARTS & CRAFTS 

"American S<[uare Dance" 

produced by (ioronet Instructional Films. 

RECREATION FILMS' 

"Chance to Play" 

produced by March of Time for the 

(General Electric Company. 

"\\ ild Fowl in Slow Motion" 

produced by Hawley-Lord. 

RELIGIOIS FILMS 

Catholic: "l pon This Rock" 

Jewish: "'^'oiir Neighbor Celebrates" 

Protestant*: "(iod's >X onders in a 

Woodland Brook" and 

"A Wonderful Life" 

AMATEUR FILMS 

"Mv First Week at Dartmouth" 

and Awards of Merit to Boston University. 

•Indicates doulile winner of Hrsl award. 



Festival Chairman, the Reverend John E. 
Thomas, presides at the Copley-I'laza luncheon. 




24 



BUSINESS SCREEN M.VGAZINE 




Film Fe.sliviil previi'iirrs .srr iniluslrial rrliitlon.s film.-, al (.Ifi iliniil. 



A Itiiiinini- jui\ iiillilif, till- lilm\ in llir .iii'tini/ ml- '//.■:;.•?>. 



"Oscars" to Eleven Films at Cleveland 

KH IMll \\M M. FILM IKSIIN \I VV FINN r.()I.|.K(;F ON .11 NF II 




Floyuk ISkookkk 

Cleveland Festival Speaker 



Nl \HI,^' KO FILMS were screened at Feiiii 
(!iilli>pi' nil Jiiiip 14 as the Clovclancl Film 
(!(>uni'il rimiiitHiiird the growing tradi- 
tion of leadership established four years ago 
with the \')r>\ rdiliori of ils uniiual Film Festi- 
val. An evening din- 
ner al the Masonii' 
Tcni|>le. willi Dr. 
Floyde L. Hrooker 
of the I . .S. Offiee 
of Fdiieation and 
('hairman of the 
Board of Trustees 
of the Film Council 
of America as prin- 
ei(>al speaker, eon- 
eluded the day's 
event.-i. 

The Council's tra- 
ditional "Oscars" were also awarded to II out- 
standing 16mm films in 10 categorical groups 
at the lianquet event. Arthur F. S|>aeth. amuse- 
ment editor of the CLEVELAND News, was toast- 
master. (General chairman of the Festival this 
year was Leslie F. Frye of the Cleveland Public 
Schools but Until Thompson served as acting 
festival chairnian in .Mr. Frye's absence. The 
"Oscar" presentations were made by W. Ward 
Marsh, film and drama i-ritic of the Cl.EVELAM» 
Plain Dkvleh. 

Brooker Talk In Serioii- \ i-in 

Dr. Brooker na\e his listeners a serious p'c- 
lure of the world today and its responsibilities 
and problems. On the theme that "just living in 
this world is not enough, v ou must live with a 
pur(M>s«- " he cited the major issues facing edii- 
catitm. the breakdown of our communications, 
eniphasi/.iiig the lag lH'twe<'n the advances ol 
<cien<-e and the laik of understanding over the 
world. 

As national represj-ntative of the Film ("ouniil 
movement, he cited it-, abililv to make mectinL's 
such as the Festival (xissible. comparing il- 
progresw with that of other groups in other 
countries which do not know how to coo|)iTalc 
or even begin to work logelher. 

Fotiv.il llic |{c>iill ot Locil LITorl 

Once again, the Cleveland Festival pri'ved the 
Hiirth of 1 iio|»'i;iiiiiti .Old i-lTorl a- numerous 



business, civic and educational leaders worked 
together. The following were committee chair- 
men: Kenneth K. Nermillion I Membership! : 
Mrs. Florence Craig ( Program l ; C. J. Dover 
(Publicity I; Earl (Carpenter ( Reception I ; and 
Mr. Frye. general chairman. Eleven persons 
served as film screening and selection chair- 
men, including Vance ("hamlHTlin: Lt. John L. 
Berichon: Paul .^niilh: Butb A. Matson; Clifford 
Bigelow; Charles A. .McBride; Vi . M. Butts: 
William E. Kofron; Florence Craig; Ronald 
Dav and Miss Thompson. 

Individual "Oscars" to be awarded the eleven 
top award-winners are being suitably engraved 
for later delivery. It is interesting to note that 
both Boston and Cleveland Film Festival juries 
rated Bip Idea, the .Swift & Company "freedom" 
film [iroduced bv Wilding, as the best of its type 
in the showings. -Iniiry lit>\ produced by AfTi- 
lialed for the Mental Health Film Board was an- 
other dual winiKT. 

Elizabeth I'.unady. of the Cleveland Public 
Library's Film Bureau, as president of the Cleve- 
land Film Council. o|M'ned the day's events at 
9:LS a.m. with a brief address of welcome. 
Dr. FMward llodni-tl. president of Fenn College, 
then assumed the ride of host for the dav to 
more than 160 registrants for the Festival screen- 
ings. A rescreeniiig of the winning films took 
place after the ilinner and "Os<ar" presenlatii>iis 
in the evening. W 

C.oi Ncn. PhesIKENT F.lizahrth lliiiKuh Irenler 
hetdii) helps al llir rfjiislralinn ilfsk. Ruth 
Thompson (Irjil and Kenneth I ermillion. re- 
rrpliitn rhnirninn. are oilier fe\liiitl iiorliTS 




These Filin- Won "Oscars" 


at (lleveiaiiil's Film Festival 


1 « « * • 


INDl .>II{1AL lULATlONS 


"Big Idea" 


produced by Wilding Picture IVoduclions, 


Inc., for Swift & Company, 


CIVIL DEFENSE & SAFETY 


"Pattern for Survival" 


produced bv Cornell Film (.ompany. 


PERSONNEL TRAINING 


1 "Two (iuvs Nanieil Jcm"" 



produced bv The Jam Handv Organization. 

Inc., for Frigidaire Div. of C.M. 

■» ♦ * 

PI BLIC RELXTIONS 

"Mirai'le on llie Me«a" 

prtiduced by .Man Shilin Productions 

for P. I^irillard ("ompanv. 

MENTAL HEALTH 
**.\npry Boy" 

producivl bv AITilialed Film Produ<*ers. 
Inc.. for the Mental Health Film Board. 

* * « 

\l)l IT EDI ( \TION 

"Tlie ClialUnge" 
ifleased by the March of Time. 

* « * 

CLASSROOM FILM>' 

"The Nile River \ alley" 

produced bv .\cademy Films. 

"Pompeii and \esiiviiis" 

produccil by Encyclopaetlia Britannira 

Films. 

CI Lil l{ \L \RTS 
"Images Medieval" 

submitted bv Franco- .Vmerican 
Distribution Center, Inc. 

RELICION 

"Window on the Sk\" 

produced b> Alan Shilin Productions for 

National Bd. of Prot, KpiM-»|>al Church, 

TR \\ EL 

"Brili<li Columbia" 

produced by Paul H<K'IIer Produetioniv, 

I lira two winner* in lhi« rtirtarj, with 

.„,..i..i ... ,,r|. 



NUMBKR I • \ Ol t M K. I J • O.il 



2S 



ASSOCIATED I N I) I > I K I i;> (.Hdtl' Mlt)\\> \\ \ \ lo xihkKN 

PlanI Movies Popular in Quad Cities 



l.\ Si;ml.N |{. Mill 



Emi'I.oykh-Fmim.oykk CoMMiMc vrioNs has 
I'fcntiic ii li\-u<>r(l of pifscnl ila\ iiian- 
afit'iiient. Kverx •lliiiiking"" member of 
modern managenieiit mil only swears by il. but 
believes there must be more of it. The phrase 
lan bf likened to the Bible, in general, il is a 
"good" thing. There arent any bad ronnola- 
tions. 

when a specifii- coMnnuniiations program is 
being developed, however. Employ t-rKtiiployce 
Communi('ati<^ns mean all things to all men. 
The areas of agreement are iincoinmonh small. 
The media a<'ceptable for iiielusion in a well- 
rounded eominunication program are as diverse 
as the number of men developing programs. The 
key to the whole divergency of opinion is found 
in the common expression. "That may be fine 
for your company, but it wouldn't work in 
mine." Another way of expressing this could be 
that the atmosphere of acceptability differs from 
company to company for each type of communi- 
cation attempted. 

Pictures Acceptable in .Any Plant 

The motion picture is one conmiunication 
lechni(iue that can be wholly acceptable in any 
compaiu situation. The atmosphere is never one 
of suspicion and distrust because the motion pic- 
ture is already a stable, accepted institution in 
our society, developed over long years in the 
entertainment field. The employees of every 
company frequent the local theaters voluntarih 
as a part of their normal, dailv lives. 

The regular showing of motion pictures before 
employee audiences is natural and basic to any 
sound communications program. It creates an 
attitude of acceptability which is necessar\ for 
full effectiveness of other formal attempts at 
communication. Communication can fully suc- 
ceed only where there is a feeling of confidence, 
trust and mutuality of interest. Such an atmos- 
phere is developed through the use of the mo- 
tion picture befure industrial audiences. 

The greatest drawback to the use of films in 
indusir) is built largeh upon mis-informed 



opinion. The great majority of tnodern man- 
agement sincerely believes that the cost is too 
great for the benefits derived. This conclusion 
is reached without a thorough investigation of 
the possibilities of benefit inherent in a film 
program and the ailual dollar and cents cost of 
successful!) operating the program. 

Industry Interest Leads to Program 

The Associated Industries of the (^uad-Cities 
is an industrial association which covers the 
Farm Equipment Center of the World Daven- 
port and Hcllendorf. Iowa and Rock Islaiul. 
Moline. East Moline. Illinois. Last \ear manu- 
facturers in this area became interested in the 
use of motion pictures in the plants. Actin" as 
their representative, the A-ssociation investigated 
the use of films in other industrial areas. It 
soon became apparent that the plant users of 
films were completcK sold on the program and 
several offered to come to the Ouad-Clities to do 
missionary work before a meeting of local in- 
dustrialists. The unbridled enthusiasm of film 
users is sufficient to embark even the pessimist 
on a "plant-movie program."' 

As "all roads lead to Rome" in ihe motion 
picture business as elsewhere, the Association 
was soon communicating with Ott Coelln of 
Business Screen and Richard Hough of Modern 
Talking Picture Service, Inc. After Mr. Coelln 
and Mr. Hough addressed meetings of indus- 
trialists in the Quad-Cities, il was apparent that 
the Association was going to have a film 
program. Interest was high. 

Revolving Film Collection Set I'p 

A revolving film library has been established 
in the Association office for the Quad-Cities. 
Modern Talking Picture Service. Inc.. supplies 
the library with a definite nundier of free films 
each month. The films are scheduled one vear 
in advance. Each of the conq>anies participat- 
ing in the program also has a one-\ear film 
schedule which allows them oiu- film per week 
on a regularly scheduled day. A companv rep- 



The first shift at the Rock Island Arsenal sees films (screen is al iar lejl). 





Films Are Easy to handle: R. J. Cramer, 
exchange mpr. Ilejt) and Stan Hill, ad- 
miniitrative asst. oj the Associated Indus- 
tries of Quad Cities agree on that point. 



resentative picks up the film the morning of the 
showing and returns it the same afternoon. Tht 
Association furnishes projection equipment t« 
those companies not having equipment of theii 
own. The films are projected during the lunch- 
eon period. 

The cost to any company in the Quad-Cities' 
area for having an in-plant film program is the 
cost of picking up and returning the film to the 
A.ssociation office. 

-No Elaborate Facilities Needed 

Little theaters began springing up over night 
in the area. To the outsider the.se little theaters 
resemble a cafeteria, a corner of a warehouse, 
an aisle in the assembly department or an old 
conference room. Local employees watch these 
nondescript spots blossom into "the theater" 
once a week with the regularity of clockwork. 

The varietv of films available for these pro- 
grams is a credit to American busines.s. The 
success story which almost always carries a 
"free enterprise" moral is the favorite of most 
employees. Films which show a manufacturing 
process are followed avidly by emplovees who 
themselves are engaged in an entirely different 
oiM-ration. The thirst for educational informa- 
tion on the part of the employee never dies. Who 
would assume that the employees of a foundry 
would become enthusiastic about the pro|)er way 
to carve the Sunday roast? It hap|H-tied in the 
Quad-Cities! Pure entertainment is used spar- 
ingly as most audienies prefer films on a higher 
iiilellectual plane. Safel). training and travel 
round out a well-developed program for everv 
plant, from our experience. 

Here"- W b;il Local Plant- \re Doing 

Knq)lo\ee interest in ihi- program is main- 
tained at a high lexel when films are shown on 
.1 regular basis. There was only a slight drop 
in attendance at Red Jacket Manufacturing Com- 
pany (pump manufacturers! when the raging 
Mississippi brought flood waters very close to 
llie iiack door of the plant this spring. 

John S. Tilley Ladders Company. Inc. llaij- 
ders I reports that nianv emplovees w ho went 



HI SINESS SCREEN .M.\GAZINE 



BLSIXESS SiltE 



.home for lunch now eat at the plant on "movie 

[day." 
— Nu-\V'ay t!or|>orali()ii loil limners I has foiitui 

I it expedient to post the name and retiume of the 
next film on the bulletin hoards to satisfy work- 
ers' interest and ijuestions. 

I — International Harvester Li>nipan\ Kast Moline 

I Works (farm i-<|ui|)nienl t entourages eni|)loye<'s 
to borrow the lilriis for churrh and ( i\ ii iiici-t- 

I inp showin;;s. 

Rock Island Arr<enal Ihis DaiK Siious 
i — The Rock Island Arsenal shows films daily in 
I different lo<-ations in the shops and laboratories. 
These and other plants in the area are con- 
' vimed that the showing of lilnis engenders bel- 
j ter relations, higher morale, greater relaxation 
' and a belti-r ^alislied employee. 

The greatest benefit of a film program is the 
mutuality of interest that is develo(>ed between 
' the employer and the employee. The showing 
of a him is a techniipie in whiih both employer 
i and employee can participate on an cipial level. 
Executives and workers watch the fdm together 
and both haye the same mental and emotional 
ex|R'riences as the film progresses. The gap be- 
tween the two groups is materially reduced. This 
is es|H'cially true as the films bring them to- 
gether i>n t'onsiderations of cultural and educa- 
tional yalue which wipuld never be broached 
otherwise. It builds much confidence and trust 
lo see the "boss" react and haye feelings the 
same as any other human being. The feeling 
develo|)ed is a sound basis for good employee 
relations in any company. 

(iood-will of the employees is a priceless pos- 
session in business today. This Association fi-cls 
that using motion pictures properly in the plants 
is builditig that good-will in the Q)uad-Cities. 

Plentiful Supply of (iood Films 

W ith the |irinci|ial source of these plant movie 
programs conveniently located in the Quad 
Cities, an adecpiate and continuing supply of 
good programs seems assured. New materials 
made available at regular intervals through a 
revolving library help keep plant "niovii- da\" 
a permanent t^)uad Citie.s" feature. Q' 




C W . Andkkson, I reiitfr I rxrrulivr nice- 
yrciitient of Associalfil liulustries uilh 
Sla/i Hill Irifht) adminUlralivr assistant, 
and Ru.\srU Parmrntrr of \u-Wa\ Corp. 
(holihn/i Hicrn ami sound projrctor.) 




era 



# V gula "u|irn 
liim-.r" on Kriilay. 
May 25 at I h r 
iiioilrrn new stu- 
4lios of (Jiicaco 
Film Lalioralory, 
Inc. \va< thr inatip- 
iiral fwul allfml- 
t'tl l>y iiiiiiu>rnu> 
>|ioii-»ur, agrnry, 
and "lalrnl" prr- 
sonalilirs. Thr nfw 
farilities arr |ri- 
rati*H on ( ihirajiii*-- 
iirar norlh>i(li* at 
.V> E. Siiprrior St. 



(:ni(:\(;<> i ii \i i'Lays host at sti dki oi'KMNr, 





Mkkt TlIK ."sTAKK of liliicago lilni: il. to r. 1 are 1\. 1). t.aslcriiiic 
Howard .Schyler. M. Manzo.-illo. Al Stacey, Hal Sceor. Mike Dale. 
I)i( k Carver, H. Siemon, Fred Abel, George Jarrett. and Aimer Hro- 
stroni. all pictured at opening da\ lerenionies May 2ri. 



AVHIM- 1 IIOSI. I'lll.-IM 

(ser iiirlurc:, ilmve) at 
the I :hira|;o Film formal 
oprnini: wrrr <s<-rnr al 
Irfi. 1. lo r. I Fred Rohclr. 
Hui;h Jamrs, and I'aul 
Rrirkman of Fuller. 
Smith & Rose ad acenrj. 
Directly above (I. to r. I 
arr Roger Moran. Wm. 
Wilson. J*»e Morton, and 
Frank Inlrrlandi i>f 
Y o u n (c & R u II i ■' a m 
agency staff. Kay Stan 
ley, TV and film star, 
is ihr lovely rrnlrrpiccr. 
Mrs. A. (•. Diinlap, jirr^i- 
dcnt of Chicago Film 
Sludios. was hoslrss at 
thr nfirning rvrnt. Thr 
organization was found- 
ed in 142R and also main- 
tains srparatr and rx- 
tensive film laboratory 
facilities in Chicago. 




ciiKckiM, ON "T\k(;kt r.s.A." 

• The Litest sound motion picture designed 
to helji industrv understand and train for 
atomic defense is Tar^ft i.S.4. just l)ro- 
duced by Cornell Film Company of iN'ew 
York (^ilv and available on an outright 
print purchase basis. Shown at left(l. lo r.) 
are Captain Warner of N. Y. I'ort of \u- 
ihorilv : Herman Hoxer, writi-r-<lirector <if 
the film: and M. J. Sal/burg, presidcnl 
of Cjirnell Film (iompaiiy. The film is the 
second by this producer. Their first film 
I'allern for Survival has just won the 
(!leveland Film Festival Award for the 
"Im-sI of ils kind" in civilian defense. 



Md DIKKCTOKS III \lf WOLFF 

• Kaphael (i. Wolff. Hollywood coin- 
mi-rcial film produier was host re- 
cenllv lo more than 'M) l.o« Angeles 
advertising agency art dirivlors with 
whom he dis<-u»»rd film techniques and 
the art direilors" role in TV films. Stoiv 
board of This Is Life, recent Wolff pro 
duction, is in background and him was 
also iwrivned in both color and black 
and white as a<lapted f<ir television use. 
Studio tieparlment heails answere<l ques- 
tions of the art diri-< lors and explained 
equipment features and their (unctions. 




NUMBKR t • \Ol.lMt i: • lost 



27 



CASK 
IlISTOKIhS 



"Speakiiij; »>l Kulilxr " I'ii-mmUs Dniinalic 

Story of Maiiiifiictiire and Prodiiols 

S|»oiiMir: Ijiiteil Stal<>« Rubber Company. 

Title: Sprakinp of Ruhht'r. 27 miii.. li & w, 
produreil l>y Leslie Hmish I'miluclions 

■*• This is a story about rubber, the people who 
make rul>ber and the irnportance of rubl)er in 
our daily lives. It tells of new advances in rub- 
ber made possible by business, big and small. 
working in a land of freedom. The film's prin- 
cipal characters are a retired rubber factory 
foreman, his grandson and the \ ital raw mate- 
rial, rubber, it.self. 

Jinuny, the grandson, lives in a "rubber 
town" but has never given much thought to the 
rubber business until he discovers his grand- 
father upholstering a chair with foam rubber. 
Grandpa then demonstrates the rciiiarkable prop- 
erties of rubber and shows Jimmy how industry 
makes rubber products. He points out how com- 
panies must serve the public in order to stay in 
business. 

The film includes scenes of the Far East 
rubber plantations, the production of svnthetic 
rubber, building and testing of tires, manufac- 
ture of waterproof footwear, and the use of 
rubber in transportation, sports, industry and 
national defense. 

William Harrigan. veteran actor of stage and 
screen, plays grandpa in the film. The produc- 
tion marked the first film to be completed at 
Leslie Roush's new studios at Mineola. 

Speakinp oj Rubber is a basic story about 
rubber which does not attempt to be technical. 
IS Rubber recommends it for showing to com- 
munity groups, service organizations, lodges. 
employee meetings and groups of businessmen, 
and to school students, in particular. 
Distribution: Prints, accompanying teacher's 
guiiles and three booklets on rubber are 
offered on free loan upon application to the 
company's Public Relations Department. 12.10 
Avenue of the Americas. New '^ i,rk 2(1. <^ 

The If ool Stork Inslilute presents . . . 



Wool Stock Institute Educates Consumers 

KK'i.NOTL OF PR0(;RAM I.S M.W Al l)l(» I II.M "WASIK Nol, W \\T NOT" 



* Rack in 1938 or '.SO a wool labeling law was 
passed by Congress ordering that wool wearing 
ap[)are| must be plainly labeled if il contained 
ri'-proeisscd or re-used wool. Main in the 
garment industry have long fell llial such label- 
ing, while it may be accurate and factual, does 
not tell the full story of the various qualities, 
such as resiliency, strength, and warnuirss of 
the wool in a given garnienl. 

In oilier words, some re-processed and re-iised 
wool iiia\ be actually superior in wearing quality 
to some types of lower grade "virgin" wool. 
\ et the terms "re-processed" and "re-used" have 
been a stigma in the public's and the retailer's 
acceptance of garments made from, or partly 
from, "non-virgin'' wool. 

Particularly hit by this situation liiue been 
the thousand leading dealers in wool waste prod- 
ucts, suppliers of materials for making re-proc- 
essed and re-used wool cloth. The dealers, 
through their a.ssociation, the Wool Stock Insti- 
tute of the National Association of Waste Ma- 
terials Dealers, are wasting little time these davs 
fighting the law through government channels, 
have instead begun a campaign to educate 
textile engineers, garment manufacturers, re- 
tailers and, most important of all. the wool gar- 
ment buying public on just what the tags on 
wool clothing really mean. 

Without large funds to accomplisli this aim. 
the Wool .Stock Institute has embarked on a long 
range program designed to spread the word as 
far as possible for each dollar put into the cam- 
paign. Keynote of the project is a new fibi, 
recently released, ffaste I\'ot. Want Not (pro- 
duced by Audio Productions. Inc.). According 
to Mr. Ben Kaufman. Secretar\ -Treasurer of the 
Wool Slock Institute, a motion picture was 
selected because "it seemed to be a most effec- 
tive educational medium, highly adaptable and 
the best method of reaching ihe consuming pub- 
lic that has to be the one to create demand for 
re-processed and re-used wool." 

The film is not a pretentious effort, but con- 
tains a lot of information that has been useful 
to and downright interesting to consumer and 
technical audiences with whom il has been 
thoroughly tested. 

Its theme is that the eflicient housewife has 
many opportunities to economize on wotil gar- 

Sortini: iij rajis and clips jor reproics.sinii. 



iiient purchases without sacrificing the neie!.-;ir 
qualities she seeks. This is pri-seiili-d in a tellin 
way, and honestly. Il makes no ilaims lli, 
virgin wool producers object to, or would cai 
to refute (a representative audience of thi i 
have already seen it I . Il tells more about lli 
advantages of wool- of all kinds than pai 
ticularly of wool garments made from wa«l 
materials. 

Re-used wool clothing, the |)icture explain- 
is made from old garments gathered by com 
menial or charitable collectors and turned ov 
to dealers who sort them carefully throu^ 
several stages as to grade, color, etc. (there :ir 
212 classifications of wool "rags"). Re-pr 
e.ssed wool cloth is made from the excess "cli| ■ 
resulting when new wool is cut to patterns n 
garment making. Both rags and clips, afi 
sorting, go through a process of being restor 
to fiber length and then carded, thoroughl 
washed, treated and formed into garments ju- 
as virgin wool is. 

fp'asle Not, Want Not is a multi-purpose fili' 
will be placed on permanent loan with son 
state film libraries, promoted to technical scho. 
clothing retailers and government agencies. ' 
first importance, however, is its use before ali- 
enees of housewives, where lies the crux of n 
whole future of re-used and re-processed wo.. I 



Indonesian Government'!? First Film 
for U. S. Is Rated Sub-Standard 



Sponsor: Office of Information, Indonesian 

(Government. 
Title: This Is Indonesia. 10 min., b&w. pro- 
duced by The Demby Companv. 
"»f This is a first public relations film venture 
in the United States of the young government o£ 
Indonesia. What could have been a fascinating 
film about this picturesque land, its political 
philosophy and controversial entry into the 
family of nations is bogged <lown by muddy 
amateur pliotography and a platitudinous script 
Today's demanding audiences could hardlv come 
away from such a presentation as this with any 
fair or favorable picture of Indonesia. Best solu- 
tion would be to retire it as (juickly as possible. 



7 lie raw materials become fashionable parments. 




■y^gpy 



28 



BUSINESS SCREEN MA<;AZINE 



Quality of Treatment and Content 
Hi^h in International Paper Film 



S|>(>ii-or: ItitPriiational Paper Company, 
liliii: In l'arliiershii> iiilh \alure. I'ro- 
; iliicer: Raphael G. Wolff Studios. 

K riiis film lias several objectives. Tlie Inter- 
i.iliMiiai I'api-r Compariv wanted to show its 
•mplovees some of the facts aiiout the company, 
lie extent of its operation and how tiie eni- 
.JiiNces fit into the overall picture of the wide- 
id operation of International r'a|M>r. For 
!iarc-liol(lcrs and potential sliarc-lioldcrs. the 
ire shows what an invi'slnient in the com- 
\ means and what an integrated operation 
1 i-. To its neighbors and townspeople in the 
ir> ,1-^ in which it has woodlands and factories, 
111- company shows its practice of good citizen- 
lihi|). .Vnd to paper bu\ers and the general pub- 
lic, the company presents a picture of widespread 
ind well run operations. 

The main point made by the picture is that 
International Paper Co. recognizes that trees are 
1 crop and works "in partnership with nature" 
:o secure sustained \ ields from the areas which 
t "farms." 

The company spends over a million dollars a 
year to educate its own people and its wood sup- 
pliers in forest management. It is pointed out 
that all forest plans are checked with govern- 
ment agencies, and follow the approved pattern 
for keeping the forest growing permanenlly. 
rhe company joins with other agencies in con- 
ntiv fighting fire and teaching forest fire pre- 
lion — for fires are by far the biggest single 

lers of wood. Not nearK as much wood is cut 

ich year as is consumed bv fire. 
In areas in which the conipan\ buys uood 
from private owners of wood lots, it makes a 
ipecial effort to teach the owner how to conserve 
his own woodlands, furnishes seedlings, etc. 

The film is expertly produi cd throughoul. anil 
die color is particularly good both indoors and 
out. There are many beautiful forest scenes and 
there are several very excellent animation se- 
quences. The film is ^-l minutes in length and 
this reviewer ended up wanting to see more of 
the logging operations as well as the paper mak- 
ing pri>cess<-s themselves. 

The film is suitable for general auilienccs of 
all kinds and information on it may be obtained 
from the Inlernalional Paper Co.. 220 K. 12nd 

E, New ^ ork 17. A French \ersion of the film 
alsti being produced for showing to the 
snch-Canadian employees and neighlmrs of 
I company. ^ 



'And Then There \\ ere I'lmr" l'i>iiiil;ir 

^ Winner of a first award among safely films 
at the ritent Boston Film Festival, fm/ 77ieji 
Therr U ere Four, produced b\ Koland I{ii-d 
Productions for (U-neral IVlroleum lnl.«4> used 
by SiH'ony-Vacuum Oil and Magnolia Petrol- 
eum) is setting new uutlience records in its field. 
Combined theatrical and ilirect I'inim audience 
totals now exceed s<-\eriil millions with peak 
demand ex pet led to continue through the sum- 
mer .iMil into iie\l fall. U* 




What's Hkhind Advkktisim.'s Door'.'' is 
the theme of the lop picture; the copy- 
writer belon is checkinp product facts. 



Radi" < |i: I\ I'hoduction work may be 
helped b\ dramatics or speech trainiitfi: a 
knowledpe of firoduclinn opens job doors. 



Career Slidefiliii Wins Ad Federal idii Award 



Spon^or: The Women's Advertising Club 

of Chicago. 
Title: Do You Belonp in Advertising'/ 25 
min.. sound and color slidefilnu pro- 
duced by Dallas Jones Productions. 
* That the advertising industry is well 
aware of die effectiveness of the screen 
to advertise advertising is attested by such 
motion pictures as The Uapic Key, The 
Voice of Radar and Epilopue. An even 
more dint-l tribute to the medium comes 
when the iniluslrv singles out for spe- 
cial himors an organization's campaign in 
which a color and sound slidetilm is the 
major project. 

l)n You Relonp in Advertisinp? is the 
production which helpi^d the Women's 
Advertising Club of (Miicago to first award 
in the eleventh annual competition for 
"outstanding advertising club achieve- 
ment in the interests of advertising and 
civic advancement." presi'iiU-il at the con- 
vention of the Advertising Fe<leration of 
America ihis month in St. I.oui*. fhe 
\F\ membership includi'* more than 120 
men's and women's advertising clubs in 
the l'nile<I Slates and Canado. 

The pnxluclion, lest sireenings of which 
are being held preparatory to relea.««' in 
the fall, is bnsicalK a vocational evalua- 
tion subject, for li-acliers, parents anil 
students lhemsel\i"s, but in answering its 
own question the film provides a study of 
iidverlising and its reijuirrments «» a pro- 



fession llial reaches Im-voiuI llie < lassrooiii, 
in its approach to the problem of dexelop- 
ing talent. 

The production was made during the 
tenure in office of Mrs. Gladys Blair, of 
the J. Waller Thompson Company, the 
retiring president, \mong the consultants 
in the researcii were Dr. Ilerold ('. Hunt, 
general superintendent of the (.hicago 
public schools: Dr. Arthur H. Riee. man- 
aging editor of The Nation's SehooLs: Dr. 
Charles I,. Allen, assistant dean of the 
school of journalism of Northwi-slern I ni- 
versitv, and W alter Johnson of the SiM-iety 
for Visual Kducation. 

The jury of awarils includeil I'rank 
Braucher, president, the Magazine Adver- 
tising Bureau. Inc.. New York ("ilv: Ver- 
non Brooks, general advertising ilirittor, 
Scrip|>s-IIowaril NeHspa|>ers; Samuel (.. 
Gale, vice pn-sidenl, (General Mill*. Inc.. 
Minnea|Hilis: KIdridge Peterson, editor. 
Printer's Ink, and Paul B. West. pre«idenl, 
\sHiH-ialion of National Vdverlisers. Inc 

Prints are lo be donated to the ("hicago 
area schools and will aUo Im- made avail- 
able lo high schools in other (wris of the 
I'nilol Stales. The film is diretled in 
treatment Inward the junior and si-nior 
high vhool levels. 

Ini)uiries >houlil U- addressetl lo the 
Women's \d\erlising ("lub of ('hicago. 
Room (>ll, 'M*'> N. Michigan Xve., Chicago 
I. III. It's worth xrinp! 9' 



lUMRKR I 



\ oil MK 1 : • 1951 



29 



CASE IIISTOKIKS 



i'iiiiicrr I' arm I'iliii I'riMliircr- It-am 
(ioiii|>lclc» Story of "\\ illiii-: Acr«'s" 

SpoiiMir: Thf Keyslone Slwl \ \\ in- Conipanv. 
Tillo: Killing Acres. (>0 ruin.. Umim MUiml 
ami color, prudiuccl liy The \ ciiard Or- 
gaiiizalioii. 
•¥■ Oiif reason vvli\ The N'enard Or-ianizatiini 
merits a triliule as "the fanner's friend" lies in 
the fait that in its films for sponsors serving 
rural America, the producers achieve a degree 
of honest and very human interest in setting, 
story and presentation. 

The personalized serx ices of C. L. and Frances 
R. \ enard are ihe foundation of thai result. In 
the almost three decades of their operations 
(the company was formed in 1923) their pro- 
duction and distribution activities for industrial 
concerns haxe always been related to the farm. 

All this in turn makes the companv the friend 
of the manufacturers of equipment for the 
farmer. Certainly the Keystone Steel & Wire 
Company of Peoria. III., nmst feel that way 
about it. The Venards' The Shallow oj a Pio- 
neer, madefor Ke\stone and relating the down- 
to-earth slor) of the founder of the manufactur- 
ing company, was a winner in the second an- 
nual Freedoms Foundation Awards for "out- 
standing contributions to freedom during 19.S0.'" 

.A fall release, with distribution b\ \enard 
through a keystone dealer tieuj), If illing Acres 
has won a favorable reception at showings be- 
fore representatives of the Soil Conservation 
Ser\'ice in Washington and Milwaukee and be- 
fore selected farm groups. 

The story of ff'illiiie: Acres, directed toward 
farm folk and with no geographical limitation 
of interest, was written by Art Moore, formerly 
editor of the Bloomington Pantagraph. more 
recently with ihii Prairie F'armer. and now with 
McGraw-Hill in \Xashington. 

Filmed on farms and with rural folk partic- 
ipating in the action, the production dramatizes 
land and the people whose lives are shaped b\ 
the use made of that land, whether in cotton, 
grass land.s. rolling hills, the wheatlands. or the 
prairies. But there's also the everyday life of 
the community, the barn dance, the telephone 
"girl" who "keeps track of everything and every- 
body," and the big decision of the voung folk 
on taking over the responsibilities of the farm. 

Openinii lille nj neu Keystone film. 



miim^ 



ANH Tin; 

FIVE-QUART 
GALLON 



Record of Ihe llun 

Sponsor: General Petroleum (]or|». 

Title: Joseph Doakes and the Five-Quart Gallon: 
]6nun color produced by Cate & McClone, 
under supervision of West-Marquis Agency. 

ir Statistics a-plentv were born from the con- 
ception of the 1951 Mobilgas E<'onomy Hun, 
glowing tributes to car performance, economical 
o|j<'ration and fuel consumption, tight coopera- 
tion of many hundreds of personnel, and mastery 
of a thousand details — but that is not the story 
at all, at least not of the half-hour film produc- 
tion that covered the 84()-niile grind. 

Here's the way the problem stacks ufi. Thirty- 
two cars are entered. The start is at ""three 
o'clock in the morning." The entrants are to take 
off at intervals of two minutes. Speed is to be 
as fast as the law allows for most of the course. 
Rain the first 50 miles, snow on the ground the 
last 60 miles, a temperature range of 35 degrees. 
40 m.p.h. headwinds part of the wav. mountain 
ranges, up and down from 280 feet below sea 
level to 7005 above. You have five cameramen 
to cover the run itself (others for the start). 
How to keep the camera cars ahead of the con- 
testants at the points where footage is needed? 

Adequate Coverage a Production Mn-I 

Well. the\ did it. all the wa\ from the .3:00 
a.m. start from the General Petroleum garage 
in downtown Los Angeles to the south rim of 
the Grand Canyon. The staff of the Cate & 
McGlone produiiiig organization had to light 
both the inside of the garage and the street area 
a block down, where the 32 autos were lined 
up. Nor did they miss in giving all contestants 
adequate coverage throughout the competition. 

That is the "behind-the-scenes" stor\ of shoot- 
ing the General Petro!eum-s[)onsored Joseph 
Doakes anil the Five-Quart (gallon, all in color. 
C. A. "Cap" Palmer, who wrote film historx with 
Anil Then There Were Four, also for General 
Petroleum, did the story. Palmer, who recenlK 
with Dore .Scharv co-authored Case History oj ii 
Millie, is now finishing the screen pla\ for 
NKiM's County Line (working title l. James 
Mgar. who did the editing of Doakes. won the 
Academy Award for .Short Subjects this year 
with Beaver Valley, repeating his success of two 
\ears ago with .Sen/ Island. 

To the standpoint of production \alues of 
Joseph Doakes as a consumer film for showings 
to si-rvice clubs, schools, and churches and com- 
munit) organizations should be added the poten- 
tials for showings at |)lanl recreation hours, both 



for general interest and for the delineation oil 
the ihenie of the Run. The primary thought oil 
the <'ompetition was to prove that "smooth dri*' 
ing is safe driting. eiiinomical driving." and th 
ingredients of thai recipe for the road are gooi' 
driving habits, a properlv maintained lar. ainil 
the right kind of fiii-ls and lubricants. 

(^)lorful Scenery .Acids Iiitere!<t * 

l're\iewed this nicmth in Chicago, DoaJte 
|iii'sented a rounded coverage of the Fcononi'/ 
Hun. with all the background beauty that eolo 
film would give to a course* that took in Mini 
Canvon. the Mojave De.sert. the- Panamint am 
Argus mountain ranges. Death Valley, Las V'egafi 
Hoover I Boulder ) Dam, and then across Ari. 
zona and up to the Grand Canyon. That i 
indeed a travelog, and reports from plant reerr 
ational directors are practicallv unanimous ii 
the observation that travel pictures stand ii| 
with the front liners of employee interest. 

Executive Vice President C. S. Beesemyer o' 
General Petroleum had overall direction of thr 
Run. with much of the preparation headed by 
Frank C. Meunier. advertising manager, am. 
H. A. Meader. assistant advertising manager 
The complex details required for the Ru 
entailed the services of more than 250 of thi 
General FVtroleum jx"rsonnel. starting in the fal 
of 1950 (the competition was held March 6 an 
7), 25 to 10 odic iais and cleputies of the Anieri-' 
can Automobile Associaticm. 45 senior engineer-j 
ing students of the California Institute of Tech- 
nologv as rider-observers for the AAA. hundreda 
more individuals in the later stages of th 
project. 160 ofTiciaJ autos. a special train and 
a chartered bus. 

Conditions Duplicate Average Driving 
The course selected for the two-day drive 
duplicated all conditions the average moloriat 
encounters in a year: altitude and temperaturi 
variations as already noted 1 318 miles at hi^ 
temperature I. 70 miles of cilv driving, .345 in 
the mountains, 425 of level driving. F'nirants 
were permitted to choose either Mobilgas Reg- 
ular or Special (premium). 

The sweepstakes trophy was won by a Lincoln 
sedan driven b\ Les Viland with a ton-mile 
mark of 66.484 miles a gallon, an actual average 
of 25.4-4<i. against an average of 23.923 for all 
cars, ranging from the 4-cylinder Henrv J to 
the Chrysler Oown Imperial Limousine. The^ 
average speed of the field was 40.6 m.p.h. 

Such are the statistics, valuable of course to 
molordom and likeh of interest to practically 

This l.inrohi iinii the sueepstnkes trophy. 




30 



BUSINESS SCREEN MAf;AZI.NK 



\,T> motorist. The f)la\'s l)i.- thing, however, 
ind the fihn|>la> of thi- Kuii has just about 
ivcrything, for everybody. S 



(iood Customer Relations Is Tlieiiie 
of New (ilievrolet Denier Film 

Spon-or: Ch«-vrolrt .Motor Division, 
lit I.-: The lleml Man, produced h\ I'hc 

Jam Handy ()r;;aiii/atioii. 
•¥■ One of the pioneer film sponsors 
through several decades of utilization of 
the motion picture and slidcfilm in its 
dealer programs. Chc\rolct Motors pre- 
sent.* Kdward Kvcrclt Morton. funn> man 
of the entertainment th<-atre. to star in a 
production engineered to maintain and 
improve public relations for the company's 
dealers. 

However. The Head Man is more than 
a dealer and .salesiTian picture. The use of 
Horton is a clue to the fact that ("hcvrolel 
wishes to e.xtend the appeal area beyond 
the salesroom to direct contact with the 
public at community gatherings and at 
business and service organization meet- 
ings. To that end ()rints are being distrib- 
uted to several thousand dealers with the 
recommendation they use the pnuluction 
as a public relations tool. 

Every layman, without deep tillage of 
his memory, can re<'all from the last war 
with its shortages of wanted items that all 
too manv salesmen, plagued b\ the mutter- 
ing* of disgruntled customers, threw cour- 
tesy out the window. In The Hecul Man 
is a humorous yet cautioning guide to 
~.desmen not to ^o and <lo ikewise in the 
..eriod ahead, which is likeK to bring 
similar challenges. 

Horton plays the customer who in the 
earlier sequences takes to recording the 
risibilities of inept and dis<ourteous sales- 
men and then proceeds to an all-out rebel- 
lion. Mis final solution is. as to be expected. 
• >n the hilarious side. 

An "'assistance kit" in an elaborate folder 
trom Chevrolet's Direct Selling Service 
lrll« the dealers how to plan showings of 
till- film and oulliiie> short talks for varying 
.ludiences. A large picture on the cover 
1- suggesteil as a bulletin board poster. 
Cards with illustrations and mottoes from 
the film are used in the dealers' ofTn'i-s as 
I ues for the staff. K" 

Featured stars \\dia Weslman and 
T.duiird y.vrrell Hnrliin in "The Head l/u/i"' 





HoTPOlMs Nkw Color Film in pr.idu. li..n .a Alia- itUnr- studius; llolhwu.id playrs Art Jar- 
rett (the music man I and K\elyn Ankers (second and third from left above! are featured in a 
theme bas«-d on Hotpoints All-Khv trie Kitchen. I-ouis Marh)we. wideK known dire<tor. is su- 
pervising the production. The studio set simulates a radio station. 



Saving of Georgia's Woodlands 
Shown 1>\ I iiioti Haj; in "(ireen (iold" 

Sponsor: I nion Map & Paper Corp. 

Title: (ireen Gold. 23 min.. color, pruiluied b> 
Films For lnduslr\. Inc. 

■¥■ "As you lake, so must )ou givi-." This brielK 
tells the story of Green Gold, a film about the 
forestrv resources of Georgia, much of which 
suppiv the paper industry with a i ontinuing 
source of pulpwood. Fires and uncontrolled 
logging are a crious menace to the paper in- 
dustry and this filn\ lends ammunition to con- 
servatiim efforts to save the tree crop "not for 
a \ear. or a ccnturv. but for as long as man will 
ever have need fnr iheni." 

I'nlike mam other natural resources, tn-e.* 
are conslanlK replenishing themselves if care 
and proper methods are taken \» plant and man- 
age the crop properly. Two-thirtis of (ieorgia 
is woodland, providing not only raw material 
for the inriwntine. hnnlM-r and pajx-r industries 
but capital assets in plants, mills, offices and 
luindretis of thousands of steaily jobs for Georgia 
citizens. 

Green l,idd shows Ihih tree s«-li'ction thin- 
ning — can provi<le a regular income for the 
uoodlol owner without ruining his stand: shows 
how povernineni and comjiain hri'hghlers team 
up to fight forcM fires. 

For its M'lf-iiiterest. I nion Hag explains it» 
slake in Cfcorgia's forests b\ showuig that pajn-r- 
men <ome to an area to sta\ build tremendous 
plants that need regular »uppl\. Ihey <an not 
level a woodlaiwl area and move on. The coni- 
pan\ shows what it i« doing to educate young 
foresters nnil to proviilr educatiimal materials 
fur eon««-rvalion-minded citirens of tomorrow. 
The tre«-s must l>o saveil. ^ 



Animated Soap Opera for New ^ ork 
Savings Bank- an Incredulous Tale 

Sponsor: Savings Bank .Xs.socialion of ^ew 
York. 

Title: Career for Tito; 16mm color, produced 
by Sutherland Productions. 

■*• Career for Two, a lush new color film about 
banking, of all things, was releas«'d last month 
by the Savings Hanks Association of New York. 
It is a combination of cloving soap ojiera. True 
Koniances. and economics text book and ni<-k 
Tracy. 

Bo\ is writing script for television about 
savings banks, finds it mightv dull going. Loyal 
banker's secretary res«'nls this. Th<\ dine: 
inspiration written on tablecloth. Business: 
waiter rips tablei loth off so boy can ke«'p valu- 
able notes. Pause: while audience clucks embar- 
rasM'dlv at this excruciating ginunick. 

What hap|H-!is: Boy draws cartoons lovable. 
s4-ini-aniniated gargoyles in Disney-like situa- 

(CONTtMKD ON THE KOLl.OWlNr. P»«;KI 
Snjrly is n hank's /trrdoininant asset 




> \\ I M ,->. r\ \ ^ l\ 



^mr^ 



M M IlKK I • \ Ol 1 MK i: • I''>1 



31 



ICONTIM'RI) KKOM TIIK IM( Kt KDI N (. I'AC.KI 

tions. Same time man makes |)om|>(ius lecture 
on banks. What does he say'/ By this time, 
who cares. 

Is program succes.«ful. docs bo\ pet jrirl? 
Where have you been all tliese everjasliri}; ( 19 1 
minutes? 

There are certainly better ways to tell about 
the obvious merits of savings banks than this. 
The American Bankers Association's fine series 
of stories about how banks operate, told in 
simple but intelligent terms, have certainly 
pro\eil this. D" 



"Ilie Bettfier Story" Sales Hit 
Becomes New Dartiioll Picture 



"k When Frank lietlper. salesnian-writer-lecturer 
and former baseball big leaguer, decided to 
write the book that he had tried in vain to find 
when he began selling insurance, he started 
something. His book. "How 1 Raised Myself 
from Failure to Success in Selling." jumped to 
the front row of non-fiction best sellers in 90 
days. Last fall the Dartnell Corporation pur- 
chased motion picture rights from the publisher, 
Prentice-Hall. Inc.. and 200 companies in 56 
lines of business agreed in ad\an(e to purchase 
prints to help underwrite production costs. 

Dartnell has made several slidefilm series in 
the sales field but The Bett^er Story is its first 
motion picture. The 30-minute sound film, pro- 
duced and directed by Ted Eshbaugh. has in its 
cast a number of stage, screen and television 
stars of Broadway and \'ine street. 

The title of the film is a true definition of the 
production. It is built upon seven incidents in 
his life, which helped him to success in selling. 
His "LS Week-Plan" of working habits is incor- 
[jorated in 1.3 Pocket Reminders which he pre- 
pared as supplementar\ material for the film, 
and he rewrote much of the film dialogue. He 
reenacts in the production a selling triumph of 
his career. Hence the finished picture has the 
ring of authenticity as well as dramatic effects. 
The core of the sales lesson is that a good 
man will succeed in selling if he will apply 
certain princijiles which are available to all. 
whatever the industry or job. 

The bettper Story is available on onlv a rental 
basis, the charge being $4i) plus SI (w-r person 
attending each showing. A Meeting Guide of 
.H6 page« (ontains nian> suggestions including 
an intr(Mlu.l<ir> talk. Inquiries should be ad- 
dressed to the film department of the Dartnell 
Corp.. Ravenswood and Leiand Avenues. Chi- 
cago 4<J. 111. n 

Star salesman and author Frank Beltger. 





Gutenberg's movable type opened new era. 

EvoJiilion of Good Tyixjgraphy 
Sliown ill Monsen (^>lor Slidefilm 
Sponsor: Monsen-(Uiicago. Inc. 
Title: 7'v/>e and Its Origin (96 frames), sound 

slidefilm. color: produced by Dallas Jones 

Productions. 
* llluslrali\e of the manyfold services of a 
graplii( arts film conceived with a wide-visioned 
sponsor and producer idea which is fulfilled in 
the presentation of it. Type and Its Origin is 
not only a teaching tool for Monsen typesetters 
and advertising layout personnel but also a 
cultural subject for schools and a fitting booking 
for plant showings. 

Primitive Scrawls to Modern Design 
Traced is the evolution of communication by 
writing, with the primitive man triumphing over 
time by making recordings on the walls of the 
cave, his descendants cheating space with mov- 
able messages such as rope knots. Pictures sim- 
plify into code, and Egyptian hieroglyphics 
denote sound with picture. Come the Greek and 
Roman alphabets, manuscript writing by the 
scribes of a later period and their development 
of two complete alphabets, capital and small 
letters, with the three most important stvles then 
Humanistic I Roman script I. Gothic and Cursive. 
"Circulation" demands bring the first efforts 
to '"print" books, by cutting pages of manu- 
scripts in wood blocks and pressing against 
paper: with Gutenberg's Bible (illustration) 
movable t>pe is introduced. We see the work 
of Claude Garaniond. first commercial type 
founder. Henjatnin Franklin, the ornate French 
type faces and the decorative advertising de- 
signs, followed by the modern and functional 
style of the "advertising age." culminating in 
type adaptations to 'the needs and moods of 
everyone who writes and reads." 

Program .Sold at Cost of .?17..i(l 
The cultural parallel runs alongside the indus- 
trial values throughout, which is as it should 
be, for in the larger and equally practical aspects 
the gra[)hic arts as school courses go beyond 
the business of the printer to basic processes 
and the concomitants of historv and its peoples. 
The ilevelopment of the printed writings of today 
and all the precedent steps mirror the life of 
each period and the impact of events upon 
society. 

For educational use the film is made available 
at SI 7.50. Copies of the companion booklet are 
10 cents eai h. In(|uire of Monsen-Chicago. Inc.. 
Kduialional Department, 22 E. Illinois St. 
Chicago II. III. ^ 



Coiiser\atioii of I. ami Resources 
Featured in N.u Catcrjiillar Film 



Sponsor: Caterpillar Tractor Company. 
Title: I'ouer for I'rolertion (2,3 min.) 16 mo 
color. 

•k Memories of the days when the plight i 
farmers and ranchers in the "dust bowl" are, 
was front page news are reawakened l>\ ll 
developments on the international front and sui 
news items as the voting of loans to India f. 
the purchase of American wheal. The fact 
that the conservation of soil is an ever-presei 
top slor\. and the defense program adds s(»ecii 
pertinenie to Caterpillars newest film. 

Actually there is a threefold lesson in /'owe 
for Protection: water conservation as well a 
the saving of the soil, plus land reclamation 
In all three objectives the role of tools an< 
power of earthmoving machinery is integral! 
important. Here are bulldozers preparing «alr 
channels and filling gullies: root rakes, slump 
dozers and harrows removing trees and bru- 
from woodlands and old fields: motor grader 
building terraces: other machines clearing me- 
quite and scrub from ranges, \W 

Areas covered by the cameras were the south 
east, middlewest and plains states. As nui< h o 
the footage was shot at Mountain Lake Farm 
near Oneonta. Ala., the campus of the Alal.am, 
Polytechnic Institute at Auburn was selected foi | 
the premiere in that state. A copy of tin- filn- ' 
was presented to President Ralph B. Draugh.n 
by Caterpillar and its .Alabama distributors, tli^ 
J, D. Pittman Tractor Co. (whose presi.len 
officiated! and the Burford-Toothaker Tractor 
Co, Caterpillar's central division sales manager. • 
F. D. Halierkorn. spoke on production liigh-( 
lights. P. O. Davis. Institute extension diree tor, 
presided at a dinner for 75 agricultural spe-- 
cialists. I 

The Caterpillar company consistently has donei 
a meritorious job of supplementing its film pro-j 
gram with helpful and well-illustrated literature.l 
And Caterpillars library of iu« manv Him' 
productions is evidence enough of what thej 
screen has done tor its promotion programs. 
For prints of Pouer for Protection, available-! 
on a loan basis, write the Caterpillar Trador 
Co.. Peoria. Ill,, or the area distributor. f- ' 

Dr. Ralph Dil\igho.\ (left), president of 
Auburn, accepts print of "Power for Protec- 
tion" from J. I). Pittman of Birmingham. Ala., 
at film's premiere. 




lU.slNESS SCREEN MAGAZIM 



The Index of Sponsored Films 



A cnntiiiuin;; feature of BisiNKSS ScREKN is the piiblii atioii at 

regular iiilerxals nf a loiivfiiieiil index to films re\ictteil in lliesc 

I pages. The listiiif; below covers the period of a])pro\iiiiateiy one 

' year. An asterisk followiii'i a title denotes a Case Histor\ review. 



SPONSOR 

lAdv: Clianilier i>( Commerce 
Aetna I.,ile Affilialeil Com- 
panies 
Air Transport A».»ociation 
All-Radio Presenlalion (>)mmiltee 
Allegln'nv Iiullum Steel Corp. 
Amelia Karhart l.upBaf!" 
.\merican Bankers Association 

American Cancer Society 



American Feed Mfrs. .Assn. 
American Heart Association 
American Institute of Steel 

Construction 
American International .As-so- 

oiation and \ eneziielan Govt. 



American Meal Institute 
.\merican Medical .Association 
American Petroleum Institute 
American Telephone & Telegraph 



PICTURES 



American Viscose Corporation 
Anhenser.Busch Company 
Araliian-Anicrican (>i) Company 
Armour and Company 



Auociated Railroads of New 
Jersey 

A.ssociation of .American 
Railroads 

Bank of America 

Baiisch & l.omb Optical Co. 

Bigelow Sanfnrd Carpet Co. 

Borden Company Kennedy 

Mansfield Division 
British (•overoment Nigerian 

(iulonial Oflice 

Godfrey L. Cabot. Inc. 

Can Manufacturers Institute, 

Benton & Bowles 
Catudian Oepartnient of 

Ki-^herif.. 
Canadian Industries Limited 

Canadian National Film Board 



Cclanese Corporation of 
America 

Central .Mortgaiie and Housing 
Corporation, Canada 

("hevrnli'i Motor Hiv,. (ieiirr.tl 

Motor- ( or)>. 
Chicago I>ailv News 
The Christopher*. Inc. 
City of ( Chicago Board of 

Flection i;onimissi<»ners 
Civil Aeronautics .Administration 



The Magic Key* 

Friend or Foe 

Overseas Flvin/i Classroom 

Li^hliung That Talks' 

Sand and Steel 

There h a Difierence' 

The Graduate School of 

Hankinft 
Breast SeljExaminalion 
From One Cell 
Cancer oi the Stomach, 

Fso/ihafius and Intestines 
The Grimth of a \ation' 
Guard Your Heart 

Hudd uith Steel' 

(booking Hveiene 
Food for a Strong People 
The Hume Food Supply 
7/.» Is Life' 
Thev Also Serte* 
Serfant or Destroyer 
Adventure in Telezonia 
The Iniisihlc Receptionist 
Telephone Cable to China 
Telephone Relays— U and 

Y Type' 
Telephone Screen Review 

#10 
The World at Your Call 
How Rayon Is Made 
The House That Faith Built' 
Water Horizon 

The ABC's of Beel Cookery 
Better Bacon 
Can You Carve? 
Easy As Pie 

Spring Chicken Year'Round 
Your Frankfurter Favorites 

U hat Po You Know About 
Mew Jersey* 

On the Track 
U hislle in the i\'ight 
Help Yourself (SSF) 
Wonderland ol Vision 
Color Facts That Build 
Carpel Sates* 

Success Story (SSF)* 

Daybreak at Vdi 

Good Company* 
A. Study in Black* 



Vol. No. Page 

& Issue No. 

.May SO .\I III 21 

May 51 Ml III - 8 

Feb 51 XII 1—37 

May 50 XI III 23 

May 50 XI III— 37 

Dec 50 XI VIII- 23 



Feb 


51 XII 


1 


-36 


Dec ,50 XI VIII 


-39 


Feb 


51 XII 


I- 


32 


Dec 50 XI VIII- 


-23 


June 


50 XI 


IV- 


-26 


Mar 


51 MI 


11 


10 


Mar 


50 XI 


II~ 


-27 


May 


51 XII 


III-42 


May 


51 XII III— 12 


May 


51 XII 


111-42 


May 


51 XII 


III- 


-32 


May 


51 XII 


III- 


28 


Mar 


50 XI 


II- 


-22 


Aug 


50 XI 


V- 


-36 


Mav 


51 XII 


111— 12 


Feb 


51 XII 


I- 


-34 



May .50 XI III-22 

Feb 51 XII 1—34 

Feb 51 XII 1-34 

Feb 51 XII I— IB 

June .50 XI IV— .32 

Feb 51 XII I 47 

Sept 50 XI VII 26 

Sept .50 XI VII— 26 

.Sept ,50 XI VII-26 

Sept SO XI VII-26 

.Sept .50 XI VII-26 

Sept ,50 XI vn-26 



Mar .50 XI II 24 

Mar 51 Ml 6(. 

Mar 51 XII— 66 

Mav 51 XII III— »2 

Sept .50 XI VU--t2 

May .50 XI III 23 

Mar .50 XI 11—27 

Mar 51 XII 11-65 

Nfar 50 XI 11—27 
Mar 50 XI 11—27 



Facts lor Your Food Budget' Mar ,50 XI 11-31 



The Oyster Man 
Briarclill Food Center 
Tomorrow Today 
Apre\ le Bagne 
Family Tree 
Feelings of Depression 
The Fight Science 
against Cancer 

A Modern Yarn for Modern 
Living (SSF Seriet) 

On to Fortune 
Pride of Possession 

Mon\ Hands 

The Editor's \olebook' 

You (Mn Change the World 

Chicago Voles Modern* 

A Plane Is Born 

Safe Aircraft 

Safe Airmen 

Sale Flight Oiieralions 



Mav 51 XII III 20 

Aug .50 XI V— 16 

Dec .50 XI VIII-39 

Mav 51 XII 111-20 



SPONSOR 
(xinsumers Power Company 

( XM»IMT*S. Inc. 

Curtis Publishing Company 
(Gutter Laboratories 

Dairy Farmers of Canada 
Dearborn Motors Corporation 
Deering-Milliken & t.fiiipany 
Deico Products Div,, General 

.Motors 
Department of Health, Slate of 

Vermont 
DcSoto Div., Chrysler Corp. 
Henry Di-ston & Sons 
Dodcc Div.. <:hrvsler Corporation 
Doehlcr Jan'is Corporation 
Doubleday & Company 

Dow (Chemical Company 
Dun & Bradstreet, Inc. 

K. I. du Piinl de Nemours 

Du Pont Finishes Division 
Kaslman Kodak Company 



1847 Rogers Brothers. Div. 
of International .Silver Co. 

Ethyl Corporation 



Farm Bureau Insurance Companies 

Fe*leratii»n 

Ferrv-.\lors«' S*ed Company 



Fisher Body Div., General Motors 
Ford Motor Company 



General Electric Company 



(ieneral Electric Company Lamp 

Division 
General Foods, Inc. 
General .Mills, Inc. 
General Motors Corporation 



General Petroleum Corporation 
Geophysical .Service, Inc. 

(rirl Scouts of America 
Hamilton Watch Company 
John Hancock .Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company 

Hawaiian .Sugar Planters .Assn. 
H. J. Hein/ (Company 
Holpoint. Inc. 
ilou-ehold Finance (inrporalion 



Illinois Stale Chamber of 

("onmierce 
liiitM-rijl Oil Ltd. (t'anada) 
In-lrurnent .Soeiely of 

America 



Miy 51 Ml 
May 51 MI 


! 1 1-20 
111—20 


International .Acetylene .Assn. 


May .-.1 Ml 


111-20 


International I.adies Garment 
Wiirkers I nion 


Mar 50 XI 


11-42 


International Shoe (^>mpany 



PICTURES 

Meet Oulslate Michigan 
All I Can Do 
Magazine Magic (Revised) 
/. V. Stal 

Power of Pennies 
Waves of Green* 
Wool 

Motors on Parade* 

At Our House* 

.Sales Training .Series* (SSF) 

The If ooilrutter's Dream 

Pouer-H agon 

The Shortest U ay ' 

A Bargain in Protection 

I .SSF I 
A Date uith Polly (SSF I 
Credit, Man's Confidence 

in Man ' 
Close Ip of Nylon' 
The duPont Story' 
The Case tor Color 

Functional Photography 

in Industry 
This Can Happen to You 

Designs lor a Homemaker' 

Doctor of Farm Machinery' 
The Future Is What You 

Make ll 
There h a Difference' 
A Closed Book' 
Behind the Tourist Curtain 
Background lor Beauty 
Better Gardens jor Belter 

Living 
Fishin for Fun* 

The American Couboy* 

Operation '51 

Priiie of Workmanship 

6flO0 Partners 

Steering with Standards' 

A Chance in Play' 
Electrified Farming 
A Story to Remember 

Father Sees the Light 
Partnership for the Future 
Assignment-General Mills 
Between the Lines 
Driver Education Series 

(m.p. and >sf. i 
Sale As )ou Think 
And Then There Were Four' 
Make .\o Mistake* 

The Growing Years' 
Hour a Walch Works' 

Faith in Our Future' 
On These Foundations 
MiHs Wheels Rolling 
The Big Kitchen' 
Miracle of the Rainbow' 
Budgeting for Belter 

Uiing (.SSF I 
« hat Shall I Bear:' 

(.SSF I 

//'] Good Business 
Newfoundland 

Principles of Automatic 

Control 
Acetylene Welding 
The 0\y Acetylene Flame 

Master of Metals' 

With These Hands 
One Ounce ol Salely 



Vol. No. 
& Issue 



Page 
No. 



Mav 51 MI 111-12 
.Sept 50 XI VII— 12 

Mar 51 XII H-66 
.Sept 50 XI VII-26 
May 50 XI 111-24 

Mar .50 XI II 31 

Mav .10 XI HI .W 

May 50 XI HI .W 

May .50 XI HI 38 

Mav SO XI HI 38 



Kelvinator Division, Nash- 
Kelvinalor Corporation 



Kerr-Mrtler Oil Industries 
Kev«tonr Steel & W ire ("o. 
Kiekhaefer Arroniarine Motors 



Kopper*s (Company 
fCONTINt'ED ON 



Mar 51 XII— 66 

Mar 51 XII— 67 

May 50 XI HI— 29 

Sept 50 XI \11— 12 

Mar 51 XII U— 77 

Sept 50 XI VI— 25 

Feb 51 XII 1—18 

Aug SO XI V— 23 

Feb 51 XII 1-30 

Sept 50 XI VI-26 

Mav 50 XI III-22 

Aug 50 XI V -12 

Feb 51 XII 1—23 

Dec 50 XI VIII-29 
May 51 XII 111—10 

Mav 51 XII III .35 

Dec 50 XI VIH-24 

Mar 51 Ml 11—63 

May SO XI 111—32 

Feb 51 XII 1-34 
May 51 Ml 111—10 

M.y 51 XII HI-35 
Feb 51 XII 1-27 

Mar 50 XI 11—25 

Mav 51 .\H III -.34 

Dec .SO XI VHI— 25 

Sept .50 XI VII— 12 

Sept 50 XI VII-40 

.Sept 50 XI Vn— 40 
Feb 51 XII 1-28 

Mav 51 MI HI .37 

Feb 51 XII I-IO 

M;v 51 Ml :il— 12 

Sept 50 XI VI— 2S 

Feb 51 XII 1—31 

Mav 51 Ml III 4« 

Mav SO XI HI-34 

Dec 50 XI VIII— 29 

Mav 51 XII 111—12 
Dec .SO XI VlIl-29 
.Sept 50 XI VII— 29 

May 50 XI 111-34 

Sep